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Old 11-17-2011, 10:42 AM   #1
Murray
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Default Recipe Design Help

I wonder if anyone can help me with recipe design? I use Beersmith 2.0 and find that I start off defininf the style of beer I want, and I get the guideline ranges in terms of OG, colour, bitterness and abv%. The description of the ingredients is pretty helpful, but then I find myself a little stuck thereafter.

I also have the book "CloneBrews" which is a pretty extensive recipe book, but doesn't contain recipes for the beers I like commmercially, so I can't see what type of ingredients I might be after.

I like ales, standard to strong, with more emphasis on the fruity ester characteristics than the very hoppy ones. I also like mouthfeel. My feeling is FG of around 1.012 is what I really like to get to, and carb levels around 2.0 suits me.

How do I get the fruity ester taste on the palate? Some people have suggested low yeast pitch rates, higher mash temperatures etc, but is there something more fundamental at the recipe stage which I can do?

my ideal beers are : Sambrooks Wandle Ale Sambrook's Brewery


Youngs London Gold :
Young's - our beer

Both of these are made using pretty much the same water as me (Youngs brewery is about 5km from my house)

What do you think?



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Old 11-17-2011, 11:25 AM   #2
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Bitters are, or at least should be IMO, simple beers. A base of good pale malt and a small amount of crystal are where to start. For extra mouthfeel I would suggest a bit of dextrin malt. That allows you to add some texture to the beer without disturbing the flavor but at the same time ustilize a fairly low mash temperature to keep the beer well attenuated. Esters are basically a function of yeast choice combined with fermentation conditions. Yeast strains derived from many famous breweries and beer styles are available from the White Labs and Wyeast portfolios. The books from Protz and Wheeler are quite good source material when trying to homebrew versions of UK ales.



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Old 11-17-2011, 12:28 PM   #3
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Thanks for this Ed. I agree totally with the simplicity. I am using maris otter, british crystal and that is a good idea about dextrin malt. I am using the Wyeast London ale yeast strains - tried a few of them. Thanks for the point towards Protz and Wheeler. This is my next stop !

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Old 11-17-2011, 01:47 PM   #4
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I make an Amber ale with Ringwood Yeast. That definitely gives the beer a fruity quality (more banana-ish), especially when I was fermenting closer to 70 degrees. Everyone who's tried it seemed to like it, even those who aren't really beer drinkers.

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Old 11-17-2011, 04:36 PM   #5
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Thanks Mac - I will try this yeast at a stage. I do ferment pretty close to 70 degrees.

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Old 11-17-2011, 10:48 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murray View Post
Thanks for this Ed. I agree totally with the simplicity. I am using maris otter, british crystal and that is a good idea about dextrin malt. I am using the Wyeast London ale yeast strains - tried a few of them. Thanks for the point towards Protz and Wheeler. This is my next stop !
Below is my take on Coniston's Bluebird Bitter. One of my favorites and a good example, I hope, of a basic bitter recipe. This is for a 10 US Gallon batch and this brew is at the high end of the bitter range, perhaps overlapping into special bitter territory but the framework is the same.

10 Gallons
Est OG 1.050, Est IBU 40

15.5 lb MO Pale malt
.75 lb Crystal 55L
Mash @ 66C/151F for 60 minutes

2 oz Challenger @ 90 min
1 oz Challenger @ 15 min

London Ale Yeast, White Labs WLP-013
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Old 11-18-2011, 05:59 AM   #7
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Thanks Ed. I am going to cross over to White Labs for a couple of batches. I use Wyeast London ale strains like 1968 but will see if I get any difference with White Labs. Will give that recipe of yours a try.

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Old 11-18-2011, 06:06 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigEd
That allows you to add some texture to the beer without disturbing the flavor but at the same time ustilize a fairly low mash temperature to keep the beer well attenuated.
Or... you can skip the dextrin malt and just use a higher mash temp to achieve the exact same thing.
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Old 11-18-2011, 09:46 AM   #9
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One question I have : If attenuation is something the yeast do, how does keeping the mash temperature low keep the beer well attenuated?

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Old 11-18-2011, 10:09 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murray
One question I have : If attenuation is something the yeast do, how does keeping the mash temperature low keep the beer well attenuated?
It allows the enzymes to turn more of the complex sugars into simpler, fermentable sugars.

One misconception that many, if not most, homebrewers have is that these complex sugars are sweet, meaning a higher mash temp will result in a sweeter beer (since the yeast won't convert them). They're not, and it doesn't. Mash temp ultimately controls a very simple tradeoff - alcohol vs body.


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