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Old 07-23-2010, 02:47 PM   #201
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I think roasting is more to produce some complexity in the pumpkin, some roasted notes more that anythinng. I do a roasted vegetable soup that I stick all the veggies under the broiler first. It is 10 times more flavorful and complext than when a make a "normal" veggy soup.

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Old 07-23-2010, 04:56 PM   #202
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Originally Posted by JLem View Post
Perhaps this one will work --> new link
That's a good one. You're right, pumpkin falls right into the common sac rest temps. Here's a chart I got from somewhere that shows gelatination temp ranges for lots of stuff. Pumpkin is not in there though.

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Old 07-23-2010, 05:09 PM   #203
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Here's what I have planned in the very near future.

BeerSmith Recipe Printout - http://www.beersmith.com
Recipe: Pumpkin Ale
Brewer: Adam Cole
Asst Brewer:
Style: Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Beer
TYPE: All Grain
Taste: (35.0)

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Batch Size: 6.00 gal
Boil Size: 7.58 gal
Estimated OG: 1.071 SG
Estimated Color: 10.0 SRM
Estimated IBU: 19.1 IBU
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75.00 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amount Item Type % or IBU
9.00 lb Pale Malt (MO) (2 Row) UK (3.0 SRM) Grain 56.25 %
2.00 lb Munich Malt - 20L (20.0 SRM) Grain 12.50 %
2.00 lb Pale Malt (6 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 12.50 %
1.00 lb Biscuit Malt (23.0 SRM) Grain 6.25 %
1.00 lb Oats, Flaked (1.0 SRM) (Toasted) Grain 6.25 %
1.00 lb Wheat, Flaked (1.6 SRM) Grain 6.25 %
1.00 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.90 %] (60 min) Hops 15.3 IBU
0.50 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.90 %] (15 min) Hops 3.8 IBU
0.25 tsp Nutmeg (Boil 5.0 min) Misc
0.50 tsp Ground Cinnamon (Boil 5.0 min) Misc
1.00 lb Rice Hulls (Mash 5.0 min) Misc
60.00 oz Pumpkin (Mash 5.0 min) Misc
1 Pkgs Edinburgh Ale (White Labs #WLP028) Yeast-Ale


Mash Schedule: Single Infusion, Medium Body
Total Grain Weight: 16.00 lb
----------------------------
Single Infusion, Medium Body
Step Time Name Description Step Temp
60 min Mash In Add 20.00 qt of water at 165.9 F 154.0 F
10 min Mash Out Add 11.20 qt of water at 202.8 F 168.0 F

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Old 07-23-2010, 06:20 PM   #204
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Quote:
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That's a good one. You're right, pumpkin falls right into the common sac rest temps. Here's a chart I got from somewhere that shows gelatination temp ranges for lots of stuff. Pumpkin is not in there though.
Should a step mash be used for those starches with gelatinization ranges below the typical sac rest, e.g. rye, or will they gelatinize and convert just fine at the higher sac rest temp?
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Old 07-23-2010, 06:33 PM   #205
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I would avoid ground cinnamon. It is fine enough that it doesn't easily drop out of suspension and leaves an unpleasant bitterness. I will only use cinnamon sticks from now on.

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Old 07-23-2010, 06:34 PM   #206
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Good thing my SWMBO bought some cinnamon sticks at the indian market when I was picking Jaggery for my saison.

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Old 07-23-2010, 09:00 PM   #207
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Quote:
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Should a step mash be used for those starches with gelatinization ranges below the typical sac rest, e.g. rye, or will they gelatinize and convert just fine at the higher sac rest temp?
If you use whole-grain rye, you will need to do a cereal mash to gelatinize it (as you suggested above).

However, most brewers will choose flaked/rolled rye. During the rolling process, the rye is flattened under hot, heavy rollers. The heat and pressure from the rollers gelatinizes the rye starch, thus eliminating the need for precooking the rye: flaked rye does not require a step mash.

Be careful using rye, it is high in beta-glucans and produces a very sticky mash, similar to wheat. Create a thinner mash (more water), and have a contingency plan if the sparge clogs. If you are also mashing pumpkin, you are braver than I!
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Old 07-23-2010, 09:09 PM   #208
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passedpawn View Post
If you use whole-grain rye, you will need to do a cereal mash to gelatinize it (as you suggested above).

However, most brewers will choose flaked/rolled rye. During the rolling process, the rye is flattened under hot, heavy rollers. The heat and pressure from the rollers gelatinizes the rye starch, thus eliminating the need for precooking the rye: flaked rye does not require a step mash.

Be careful using rye, it is high in beta-glucans and produces a very sticky mash, similar to wheat. Create a thinner mash (more water), and have a contingency plan if the sparge clogs. If you are also mashing pumpkin, you are braver than I!
I'm not mashing rye - though perhaps in the future. We're getting a bit off topic of pumpkin beer here, but...

My question was out of curiosity as to how to handle those starches that have gelatinization temps lower than normal sac rests. So, you are suggesting that the higher sac rest temp will not gelatinize rye starch? I thought the problem was normally that sac rest were not hot enough for some starches (e.g. rice). Confused.
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Old 07-23-2010, 09:23 PM   #209
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Hmmm, I thought I answered your question (Will [rye] gelatinize and convert just fine at the higher sac rest temp?). You did ask about rye, and I addressed that.

Normal sac rest is too hot for rye. However, flaked rye has been "pre-gelatinized" and it's starches are available for enzymatic conversion. Use flaked rye with single infusion mashes.

Regarding other starches, if there is a flaked version, use it. If not, you'll need a step mash. I only do single infusion mashes, so I'm getting out of my element here.

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Old 07-23-2010, 09:51 PM   #210
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passedpawn View Post
Hmmm, I thought I answered your question (Will [rye] gelatinize and convert just fine at the higher sac rest temp?). You did ask about rye, and I addressed that.

Normal sac rest is too hot for rye. However, flaked rye has been "pre-gelatinized" and it's starches are available for enzymatic conversion. Use flaked rye with single infusion mashes.

Regarding other starches, if there is a flaked version, use it. If not, you'll need a step mash. I only do single infusion mashes, so I'm getting out of my element here.
Thanks for the clarification. While, yes you did answer my original question, the answer did not jive with my apparently flawed understanding of the gelatinization process, so that was my way of saying "Are you sure?" - the skeptic in me...sorry. I did not realize that it was possible for temps to be too high for gelatinization to occur. I figured you needed to reach a certain minimum temp and anything above that was good. Any idea what happens at the higher temps to prevent gelatinization?
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