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Old 12-30-2010, 08:19 PM   #1
DuffMan77
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Default Pilsner Recipe question

The other week I was out in Montana and I tried the Pilsner from Bayern Brewing Company. It was medium bodied and a good balance between bitterness and maltyness for a pils, it also had a slightly sweet maltyness to it that I really liked.
I was working on designing a pils recipe and I was wondering what would be the best way to go about getting that little bit of sweet malty flavor.Two ways that I thought about would be either to just mash at a higher temp, problably around 156 F, or I thought about including some Crystal malts or Dextrine or Carapils. If anyone would want to give me some input about this I'd appreciate it.

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Old 12-30-2010, 08:45 PM   #2
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I like a pilsner to be all pilsner malt- no crystal or other grains in there! The malty sweetness comes from the malt, with enough bittering hops and flavor hops to make it hoppy. I don't have my mash schedule in front of me (I'm on vacation at the moment) but I wouldn't mash any higher than 154, no matter what. My preference is actually lower- You don't want it cloyingly sweet or underattenuated- you want it malty for any sweet flavor that is in there.

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Old 12-30-2010, 10:40 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DuffMan77 View Post
The other week I was out in Montana and I tried the Pilsner from Bayern Brewing Company. It was medium bodied and a good balance between bitterness and maltyness for a pils, it also had a slightly sweet maltyness to it that I really liked.
I was working on designing a pils recipe and I was wondering what would be the best way to go about getting that little bit of sweet malty flavor.Two ways that I thought about would be either to just mash at a higher temp, problably around 156 F, or I thought about including some Crystal malts or Dextrine or Carapils. If anyone would want to give me some input about this I'd appreciate it.
For good malty flavor you need good malt. Choose a quality German pils malt. Mashing high doesn't make it sweet it makes it less fermentable. I would mash a pils in the 150F range and if you want a hint of sweetness use a small amount of light crystal (10L).
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Old 12-31-2010, 12:03 AM   #4
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I guess i worded my question wrong, I really was wondering about about things I could do to have a little bit of sweetness in my beer after fermentation. Usually when I mash i mash at lower temps to get a somewhat drier beer so i was wondering if i decided to mash a little higher and get a less fermentable beer would that leave me with the residual sweetness I was looking for. And if that wouldn't work I was thinking of adding about 5% crystal malt to the recipe. Also I've heard of people addin Lactose to add sweetness but I wasn't really sure about adding that to a pilsner. Thanks for the replies I though, I guess 156 would be a bit unncessesary for mashing.

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Old 12-31-2010, 12:47 AM   #5
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You could always back off on your bittering hops by ~5 IBUs and keeping the same flavor/aroma additions. It'll let the residual sweetness really shine through without raising the FG too much and making it thicker or cloying. Lactose would probably be a bad idea.

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Old 12-31-2010, 05:41 AM   #6
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Here is a simple recipe based off the clone brews books:
95% pilsner malt, 2.5% Carahell(10L) and 2.5% German Munich (6-8L)
That should be similar to a Pilsner Urquell, which is maltier than most German Pils. I have not had the Bayern in a while but I do not remember it being that malty.
If you like the 95% / 5%, then you are done, if it is too malty then drop the Carahell and go with just a bit of Munich on your next batch.

For the final of my 3 pils of winter 2010/2011 I am going to go with 97.5% pilsner and 2.5% Munich for something closer to a Bitburger.

I would keep the mashing below 154 or you may end up with something more like a Scottish export.

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Old 12-31-2010, 05:42 AM   #7
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Sounds like your looking at doing a Bohemian Pils. It's a little sweeter/finishes a littler higher than a German Pils. Traditionally that doesn't mean you add crystal malt, it's about adjusting your mash.

If I was doing a single infusion I would start at 154 degrees. Your looking for around a 70% ADF. If it finishes too high then drop the temp next time. If it's too low raise the temp. It's hard to give an accurate temp without prior data.

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Old 12-31-2010, 02:48 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigEd View Post
For good malty flavor you need good malt. Choose a quality German pils malt. Mashing high doesn't make it sweet it makes it less fermentable. I would mash a pils in the 150F range and if you want a hint of sweetness use a small amount of light crystal (10L).

Just a question....If the Mash is less fermentable, doesn't that mean the all the available sugars won't ferment out (because some are un-fermentable)and thus leave more sweetness?
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Old 12-31-2010, 03:28 PM   #9
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Quote:
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Just a question....If the Mash is less fermentable, doesn't that mean the all the available sugars won't ferment out (because some are un-fermentable)and thus leave more sweetness?
Not really sweet, but a bit "thicker" in the mouthfeel too. It might finish higher, so have a bit of residual sweetness but sometimes it's a noticeable "thickness" to me, more of a fuller body rather than actual sweet taste. What happens with a higher mash temp is that there are more long-chained sugars (less fermentable) which contribute to the body.
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Old 12-31-2010, 03:36 PM   #10
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I think a little Munich would help achieve what you're looking for. I've done some Pilsner recipes that included some Munich and they had a nice maltiness to them. Your choice of yeast may help accentuate the malt as well.

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