Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Peated water?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-23-2008, 10:49 AM   #1
ceannt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Martinsburg, WV
Posts: 765
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default Peated water?

Has anybody had good results simulating peated water for Scottish ales? Peat smoked malt is a bit much, and not really appropriate. I do not have access to water that has flowed over a bog, so what I was thinking was more along the lines of "peat tea", steeping some peat moss, straining, and adding to the beginning of the boil. Any thoughts???

__________________
ceannt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-23-2008, 01:50 PM   #2
Edcculus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Greenville, SC
Posts: 4,567
Liked 39 Times on 37 Posts

Default

I really don't think you are going for any peated taste in a Scottish Ale. A real Scottish Ale is very malty with caramel notes (from caramelization during the boil) with very little to no hop profile. I think its somewhat of an American misconception that they need to be smoky/peaty.

Not saying that would be a bad thing, but at that point you are not really making a Scottish Ale.

__________________
Edcculus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-23-2008, 02:01 PM   #3
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2710 Times on 1629 Posts
Likes Given: 3484

Default

Steeping peat moss won't give you any smokiness whatsoever, since peated malt is smoky from the burning of peat moss...All you'll get from steeping peat moss is a wet mossy flavor...not, I think, what you're hoping to achieve...

It owuld be pretty nasty since Peat Moss is actually decayed Sphagnum Moss...ewww

http://www.brew365.com/malt_peated.php

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphagnum

__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew


Last edited by Revvy; 06-23-2008 at 02:03 PM.
Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-23-2008, 04:24 PM   #4
ceannt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Martinsburg, WV
Posts: 765
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

I'm not after a "smoke" flavor at all, just an attempt to simulate the water. Many Scottish Ales and Single Malts are made from water that has a distinctive flavor from flowing over bogs, some single malts have no peat smoked barley at all, and yet have a subtle, complex peat taste just from the water.
From the style guidelines for a Scottish Heavy 70/-
"Ingredients:
Scottish or English pale base malt. Small amounts of roasted barley add color and flavor, and lend a dry, slightly roasty finish. English hops. Clean, relatively un-attenuative ale yeast. Some commercial brewers add small amounts of crystal, amber, or wheat malts, and adjuncts such as sugar. The optional peaty, earthy and/or smoky character comes from the traditional yeast and from the local malt and water rather than using smoked malts."

I prefer to mimic the water as best I can for every style I make, (Dublin is easy for me, it's dang near identical to my tap water), but there are no bogs around here!

__________________
ceannt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-23-2008, 10:28 PM   #5
raceskier
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Port Townsend, Washington
Posts: 607
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

"Peat is an accumulation of partially decayed vegetation matter. Peat forms in wetlands or peatlands, variously called bogs, moors, muskegs, pocosins, mires, and peat swamp forests."

Mmmmm.......... pond scum ale!

__________________

Primary: , Boddington's Clone, Mirror Pond w/Marris Otter
Secondary:
Bottled: Fullers ESB Clone
Kegged: Mirror Pond Clone
Drinking: BM's Kona Fire Rock, Dead Guy Clone, Alaskan Amber Alt Clone, Firestone DBA Clone, Magnum/Crystal IPA
Next up: Burton IPA

raceskier is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2008, 10:30 AM   #6
ceannt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Martinsburg, WV
Posts: 765
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

I know raceskier, it sounds nasty, but almost all of the water used for brewing in Scotland has peat in it. Water is the single largest ingrediant in beer, and I believe the most neglected. I put a lot of effort, (well some say obsessive...) in researching and copying water, and if there is something distinctive about, or in, the local water in the place of origin of a specific style, I want it in mine.

__________________
ceannt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2008, 03:16 PM   #7
pjj2ba
Look under the recliner
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
pjj2ba's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: State College, Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,427
Liked 192 Times on 158 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

I'd make some water up and taste that before proceding. Bad water = bad beer. I suspect a big part of what is extracted is tanins. I would think the tricky part would be getting the peat out of the water. I'd do several filtering steps. A crude step to get the big chunks out, and then again with a smaller strainer to get even smaller bits out, and then I'd run it through a particulate filter like those for home water systems. DO NOT use an activated charcoal filter. That would remove some of the stuff you've worked to get into the water. Keep us posted on your progress.

Another option might be to collect some stream water in the fall after the leaves fall. Most of the streams around here will take on a brownish tint from the decaying leaves.

__________________
On Tap: Ger. Pils, OKZ (std Amer. lager), CZ Pils, Maibock,
Kegged and Aging/Lagering:CAP, CAP II, Wheat lager, Imperial Pilsner, Ger. Pils, OKZ (std Amer. lager), OKZ II (for base malt comparison), light beer - yes, light beer, Belgian IPA, IPA,
Secondary:
Primary: Pale Ale
Brewing soon: Saison
Recently kicked : ( IPA, Bock, Saison,
Pilsner Urquell Master Homebrewer
(1st NYC 2011, 2nd NYC 2012)
P U crowns winners in its inaugural master HB competition
pjj2ba is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2008, 04:15 PM   #8
ceannt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Martinsburg, WV
Posts: 765
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Thanks pjj2ba, I will follow your advice and taste before brewing! I was even thinking of a coffee filter...
I don't think it will take very much, but those tanins, at least to me, are an important contributor to the complex flavor (from very simple ingrediants), along with of course the kettle carmelization and distinctive yeast strains...

__________________
ceannt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2008, 04:27 PM   #9
FlyingHorse
Formerly Bike N Brew
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FlyingHorse's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Evanston IL
Posts: 1,864
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts

Default

Maybe get some authentic peat(Irish; I couldn't find Scottish but didn't look real hard) to try your water treatment.

Might give you some more complex/authentic flavors than your run-of-the-mill bag from HD or Lowe's.

'course, it isn't cheap, either

__________________
No signature required.
FlyingHorse is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2008, 04:58 PM   #10
ceannt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Martinsburg, WV
Posts: 765
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Wow, you are not kidding it isn't cheap! I just wish they sold it in smaller quantities, a quarter of a pond would probably be enough for years...
But, then again, I wonder what a Red Ale would be like with just a touch in it... and I could always do some peat and hickory smoked pulled pork.

__________________
ceannt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Peated Malt barely Recipes/Ingredients 7 07-21-2014 08:08 PM
Substituting Peated for Smoked- How much? imaguitargod Recipes/Ingredients 20 09-21-2009 08:06 PM
Peated Malt, will the smokiness fade? scottfro All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 7 12-02-2008 03:33 AM
Death by Peated Malt DirtyMick Recipes/Ingredients 12 01-10-2008 12:39 AM
how much peated malt for a light-to-medium smokey flavor? Walker Recipes/Ingredients 10 09-28-2005 12:39 AM