New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Organic Yeast




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-25-2009, 09:36 PM   #1
Picobrew
Biscuit Enthusiast
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Picobrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NW Portland, OR
Posts: 1,099
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default Organic Yeast

This may seem like a weird question, but are Wyeast/White Labs yeast packs "organic" ? I can't seem to find any information about this online, but I am really curious as to the answer. It seems you can easily do the whole brewing process in an organic fashion, except for the yeast. I know the yeast are just little fungi, but what about the process of making them? What was fed to them? What is really in that smack-pack? etc. I would think someone would have addressed this. The only thing I can find on Wyeast's website is some info about their Mead yeast, which has an organic pear juice smack pack inside. Does anyone know anything about the beer yeasts? They don't have a USDA organic stamp on them, as far as I can tell.

Here is the quote from the Wyeast site:

Quote:
13. Dear Sir or Madam, I just read that your products are produced without animal ingredients in your FAQs. That is great. Now, I would like to know if your product #4184 Sweet Mead is produced with any products which are derived from grapes (e.g. wine, grape juice, seeds, tartaric acid, grapes, rosins). I am asking because I would like to use your mead and it would be more kosher if so. It would be nearly 100% kosher if it never came in contact with animal, grapes, and grape products; if it would have not been cooked, and if it was cooked, not in equipment that contained animal, grapes, and grape products or cooked only in thoroughly cleansed equipment. I am looking forward to your answer. Yours sincerely, Albert

Albert, Good news! None of our products contain animal products or grape products. Our media pack for the wine strains contains organic pear juice. Please let me know if you have other questions or concerns. Jess


__________________
Picobrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-26-2009, 07:18 PM   #2
Picobrew
Biscuit Enthusiast
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Picobrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NW Portland, OR
Posts: 1,099
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

I just got a reply from 7bridges on the matter:

Quote:
Unfortunately, thus far we have not found a supplier of truly USDA certified organic brewing yeast. Someday we hope to change that by having some custom produced, but currently the demand is not yet large enough to provide sufficient financial incentive for a yeast manufacturer to make the required investment. I have discussed it with representatives at Wyeast, and part of the problem is some of the additives they routinely use as nutrients would not be allowed in certified organic product.

So, the straight answer is none of the Wyeast or White labs products are organic.

So does this mean it isn't really possible to do Organic homebrew? Wild yeast, I guess?


__________________
Picobrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-26-2009, 07:26 PM   #3
DeathBrewer
Maniacally Malty
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
DeathBrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 21,826
Liked 199 Times on 110 Posts

Default

I can think of a way to "extract" a new yeast cell and culture your own.

Make up your own yeast starter with organic malt, pull a sample off of it, find some fresh healthy yeast, make a slant, seperate a single new cell, step that up with wort from organic malt, etc.

Is it really of that much concern? Why not just buy a vial and then maintain the yeast under organic conditions? True, the original did not use all organice materials, but you could propagate from there.

__________________
Easy Partial Mash Brewing - Stovetop All-Grain Brewing

"Death is always with us." - Brewpastor

Quote:
DIAICYLF
We will remember...
DeathBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-26-2009, 07:36 PM   #4
Picobrew
Biscuit Enthusiast
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Picobrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NW Portland, OR
Posts: 1,099
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathBrewer View Post
I can think of a way to "extract" a new yeast cell and culture your own.

Make up your own yeast starter with organic malt, pull a sample off of it, find some fresh healthy yeast, make a slant, seperate a single new cell, step that up with wort from organic malt, etc.

Is it really of that much concern? Why not just buy a vial and then maintain the yeast under organic conditions? True, the original did not use all organice materials, but you could propagate from there.
For me personally, it doesn't really matter, I was just surprised at the lack of discussion and information about the topic. I really do like to know what ingredients I'm working with, so it naturally led me to wonder why the yeast isn't organic, because it seems it should be.

Given that the yeast isn't "farmed" on soil, I am really not as concerned with its organic-ness. Malt and hops on the other hand, if grown in a non-organic fashion, can be detrimental to soil and people etc.

All this being said, I mix and match all sorts of products now, I was just wondering how easy it would be to go all out organic. From an impact point of view, buying organic malt is probably the biggest thing you can do, then going organic with hops, and yeast is probably not even a real concern.

Hmmm, can I still call my beers organic??
__________________
Picobrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-26-2009, 07:47 PM   #5
ShortSnoutBrewing
Kwanesum Chinook Illahee
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ShortSnoutBrewing's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,266
Liked 12 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Just curious, have you spoken with folks at Roots, HUB, etc?

ShortSnoutBrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-26-2009, 07:48 PM   #6
brewingsam
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: tustin, ca
Posts: 22
Default

you could try a wild yeast,
most anything containing sugar will ferment if given a little water
but you spin the yeast wheel of fortune, whick is a lot like the "bust a deal, face the wheel" wheel form beyond thunderdome will it be a fast brew or a slow brew, is it goignto finish light and sweet, or brew totally dry, what are its temp ranges?30-40 50-70 70-100, will it only make vinigar? who knows, thats the problem with wild yeast, its wild

but if you did get one tht brewed nicely you could save the yeast cake and make your own cultures with a wort solution, but from there you are on your own

__________________

mead maker since 2004
beer brewer since 2009

when life comes at you fast, lean back and feel happy knowing that you've scattered marbles in front of it.

and when live gives you lemons, kick life in the craw and steal the lemon truck, because life drives a lemon truck you know, and drive that truck to Mexico where all your dreams come true.

brewingsam is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-26-2009, 08:05 PM   #7
Picobrew
Biscuit Enthusiast
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Picobrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NW Portland, OR
Posts: 1,099
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kilted Brewer View Post
Just curious, have you spoken with folks at Roots, HUB, etc?
No, but that's a good idea.
__________________
Picobrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-28-2011, 10:17 PM   #8
littlelord
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 60
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

i've wondered this myself... i use organic hops & malt whenever i can... so why not yeast? here's what i think: just because Whitelabs/Wyeast aren't officially labeled organic it doesn't mean they're not organic. like you said, yeast isn't a crop that's "grown" in the conventional sense so maybe it's just not something the USDA knows how to classify... or cares to classify. after reading chris white's book, i find it hard to imagine his yeast is cultivated with nasty chemicals.

__________________
littlelord is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-29-2011, 01:48 AM   #9
jonmohno
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Corn, High Fructose Corn Fortress, IA
Posts: 5,779
Liked 402 Times on 356 Posts
Likes Given: 1156

Default

At least alot or all of danstar is non-gmo.For a lot of small farmers the organic label is something unaffordable for them. Its also a marketing thing that some seem to get away with cheating on like some of the bigger organic dairy markets have done.Anytime a big company gets involved seems they like to take shortcuts to maximize profit. My question would be is how would a yeast be involved with pesticides and whatnot? Processing is a scary thing as they manipulate and frakenfry a food to fit profit.



__________________
jonmohno is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Organic Supplies Glockster Extract Brewing 6 11-06-2009 06:00 AM
Organic HomeBrews KnightBrewer Extract Brewing 34 10-25-2008 11:03 AM
organic cleaners anderj Equipment/Sanitation 5 12-06-2007 03:50 AM
Organic Brewing roggae General Techniques 72 03-06-2007 06:21 PM
Organic Beer? Cheesefood Recipes/Ingredients 17 12-07-2005 09:41 PM