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Old 11-17-2013, 05:20 PM   #1
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Default Orange blossom honey

I want to make a green tea ipa with orange blossom honey. I know that honey is very fermentable ad often times completely ferments out. So how can I use it and still get that honey aroma and flavor to complement the tea? Could I use it when kegging? I know I can use honey malt, but the use of the orange blossom is intriguing. Any thoughts?
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Old 11-17-2013, 05:23 PM   #2
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I want to make a green tea ipa with orange blossom honey. I know that honey is very fermentable ad often times completely ferments out. So how can I use it and still get that honey aroma and flavor to complement the tea? Could I use it when kegging? I know I can use honey malt, but the use of the orange blossom is intriguing. Any thoughts?
Cheers
Honey aroma and flavor comes mostly from honey malt. The orange blossom overtones of the honey will still have some effect on the flavor profile, but there's really nothing you can do to make honey less fermentable. It'll ferment out and you're left with your grainbill and hops to drive the flavor profile. Citra is a hop that has some orange flavor so you might consider using it. Honey malt: fair warning...a little goes along way. It's sweet and it's dark.
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Old 11-17-2013, 10:16 PM   #3
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That being said, is that how breweries get the honey flavors in brews like a honey wit or a honey wheat?

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Old 11-19-2013, 09:36 PM   #4
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That being said, is that how breweries get the honey flavors in brews like a honey wit or a honey wheat?
Generally speaking...yes. Though many of those beers will include real honey as well...just depends on where you want it on the dry/malty spectrum.
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Old 11-20-2013, 11:27 AM   #5
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That being said, is that how breweries get the honey flavors in brews like a honey wit or a honey wheat?
Quantity, quality, and control.

The more you add the more flavor you get. 10% - 20% will really bring through the honey flavor. Quality is very important. There are literally hundreds of brands of honey at stores that are actually not honey at all. Google fake honey to see what I mean. Find a quality brand and stick with it. Finally, the later the better. Some do it at flameout, some as fermentation dies off, others in a secondary. Finally, bottle with it as well.

Personally, I think orange blossom provides the best flavor but it is not the strongest in terms of potency. Buckwheat works the best in my experience but I did not enjoy the flavor as much. Many breweries do honey beers without honey malt and they are very well done. So its possible but takes work.
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Old 11-20-2013, 04:37 PM   #6
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Quantity, quality, and control.

The more you add the more flavor you get. 10% - 20% will really bring through the honey flavor. Quality is very important. There are literally hundreds of brands of honey at stores that are actually not honey at all. Google fake honey to see what I mean. Find a quality brand and stick with it. Finally, the later the better. Some do it at flameout, some as fermentation dies off, others in a secondary. Finally, bottle with it as well.

Personally, I think orange blossom provides the best flavor but it is not the strongest in terms of potency. Buckwheat works the best in my experience but I did not enjoy the flavor as much. Many breweries do honey beers without honey malt and they are very well done. So its possible but takes work.
Did the buckwheat end up adding a lot of molasses-y flavors? I bought a lb of buckwheat honey for some future beer, didn't really have anything in mind, but when the farmers market is on during the summer I just grab a lb of honey every other week anyway, just grabbed the buckwheat that time.

I'm trying to think of something to use it in, and might just do it in a basic wheat beer nothing fancy. Potentially an Imperial Wheat if the buckwheat will be able to hold up and not get lost in hops and esters.
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Old 11-20-2013, 04:52 PM   #7
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Did the buckwheat end up adding a lot of molasses-y flavors? I bought a lb of buckwheat honey for some future beer, didn't really have anything in mind, but when the farmers market is on during the summer I just grab a lb of honey every other week anyway, just grabbed the buckwheat that time.

I'm trying to think of something to use it in, and might just do it in a basic wheat beer nothing fancy. Potentially an Imperial Wheat if the buckwheat will be able to hold up and not get lost in hops and esters.
Imperial wheat sounds perfect. I found buckwheat to be a little funky...maybe even barnyard-ish. Slight molasses but not much IMO.
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Old 11-20-2013, 06:16 PM   #8
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I recently brewed an orange blossom cream ale (used 1 lb @ flameout as the adjunct in a 5 gallon batch). The aroma and flavor is really nice-i think it really works great in a cream ale. I think it could also work well in an ipa, although you might want to dial back the finishing/dry hops a bit to keep them from overwhelming the honey. I know a lot of people will tell you to not boil/heat the honey, but it's a lot easier to just add it at flameout, and I still have plenty of aroma and flavor in my beer.

Personally, I probably would leave out the honey malt, just to keep things simple, and to see if the OB honey is coming through on it's own.

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Old 11-20-2013, 06:42 PM   #9
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Imperial wheat sounds perfect. I found buckwheat to be a little funky...maybe even barnyard-ish. Slight molasses but not much IMO.
The barnyard-ish makes me think of a saison, might be a fun experiment.

To be on subject of the thread though, recently did an extract kit for my father (I don't know why the difference of 20 dollars wasnt convincing enough for him to let me do all grain) of a honey wheat ale. For accuracy sake, it was American 1010 1 smack pack, 1 oz of saaz or sterling (a hop that starts wtih an S, I wasn't paying that much attention that day evidenced by almost burning the house down during this simple brew). And 1lb of honey, I don't it was orange blossom since it was so friggin dark, added at flame out.

Moral of the story, just bottled on sunday and the final hydrometer sample I took after cold crashing down to like upper 30s, it had a very sweet honey tinge to it that was very delicious, and once the bottles are fully carbonated the sweetness will get cut by the carbonation. I fermented very very warm at 74-76, basically sat it next to a baseboard heater and let it ride (lots of delicious banana notes). So the honey will survive, just depends on a lot of factors.
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Old 11-20-2013, 08:07 PM   #10
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Awesome input gents. I appreciate it. Certainly a lot to think about. I should be brewing this in a few weeks once I nail done a recipe and a plan for the green tea and honey. For the tea I think I'm just going to brew it separately and add it at kegging (the same way I would if adding coffee). The honey, I'm leaning toward adding as fermentation settles down. I don't want to hike up the ABV. Looking for something in the 6-6.5 range. So I figure if I add it late it shouldn't add much, if any, and it should optimize the flavor and aroma im looking for from the honey. My concern with that though would be the consistency of the honey and it just settling to the bottom of the carboy or the honey coagulating. So to avoid that I was thinking of heating up some water and trying to dissolve or at least "thin out" the honey before adding it.

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