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Old 01-26-2009, 09:08 PM   #1
starrfish
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Default Olde Ale Yeast suggestion

Question is what yeast????? looking to hit around 9% +/- mark in this Olde Ale.

Working up a recipe for a hop-less old ale (see my other post mugwort how much is enough http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/mugw...-enough-97392/) recipe is going to be a partial mash, but here is the full mash recipe I'm working from:


Old English Ale
10 lbs. pale malt (2 row) (substitute 8lbs light dry extract for partial mash)
4 lbs. Marris Otter
1 lb. crystal malt (60)
2 oz. black malt
12 oz. molasses

Bitter with
2 oz mugwort, 2oz yarrow, 2oz heather, 1grm sweet gale, and 50-75 juniper berries. (not sure yet on juniper berries)

any suggestions on a good strong yeast able to hold up to the 8.5 - 9%+ alcohol.
Don't want to use a wine or champagne yeast. would really like to stick with an ale yeast.

thanks in advance.

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Last edited by starrfish; 01-27-2009 at 02:14 PM.
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Old 01-26-2009, 09:10 PM   #2
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If you are making this soon Wyeast just released some Imperial Strains. One of them is actually called the Old Ale strain, it's a high alcohol tolerance english strain with Brett. I plan to brew an Old Ale while it is out just so I can use this strain.

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Old 01-27-2009, 02:56 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonedef131 View Post
If you are making this soon Wyeast just released some Imperial Strains. One of them is actually called the Old Ale strain, it's a high alcohol tolerance english strain with Brett. I plan to brew an Old Ale while it is out just so I can use this strain.


checking if shop i use (in NC via the web) can get it. other shop I use online can't get it DOH! found a few places on line that carry it, just farther away than i usually like to order my yeast from.


This yeast is EXACTLY what i'm looking for!
9097 Wyeast Old Ale Blend - Private Collection. To bring you a bit of English brewing heritage we developed the "Old Ale" blend, including an attenuative ale strain and a Brettanomyces strain, which will ferment well in dark worts and produce beers with nice fruitiness. Complex estery characters will emerge with age. Pie cherry and sourness will evolve from the Brettanomyces along with distinct horsey characteristics. Apparent attenuation: 75-80%. Flocculation: medium. Optimum temp: 68°-75° F

thanks for the info!
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Old 01-27-2009, 05:45 PM   #4
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Quote:
horsey
The other red meat.
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Old 01-27-2009, 07:01 PM   #5
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"Pie cherry and sourness will evolve from the Brettanomyces along with distinct horsey characteristics."


LOL been trying to figure out WHAT that means?!?

Aroma of horse?

Makes you take a crap in the middle of the road?

Draws flies?

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Old 01-27-2009, 08:02 PM   #6
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Aroma of horse?
Sort of, more an aroma of a barn or barnyard where a horse would stay. I have always gotten more of a "hay" smell off of Brett than and actual horse odor.
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:09 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starrfish View Post
Question is what yeast????? looking to hit around 9% +/- mark in this Olde Ale.

Working up a recipe for a hop-less old ale (see my other post mugwort how much is enough http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/mugw...-enough-97392/) recipe is going to be a partial mash, but here is the full mash recipe I'm working from:


Old English Ale
10 lbs. pale malt (2 row) (substitute 8lbs light dry extract for partial mash)
4 lbs. Marris Otter
1 lb. crystal malt (60)
2 oz. black malt
12 oz. molasses

Bitter with
2 oz mugwort, 2oz yarrow, 2oz heather, 1grm sweet gale, and 50-75 juniper berries. (not sure yet on juniper berries)

any suggestions on a good strong yeast able to hold up to the 8.5 - 9%+ alcohol.
Don't want to use a wine or champagne yeast. would really like to stick with an ale yeast.

thanks in advance.
I would use this strain.... I have a hobgoblin clone that I made with this strain. Its very smooth. It was Orfys recipe.

YEAST STRAIN: 1728 | Scottish Ale™

Back to Yeast Strain List
Ideally suited for Scottish-style ales, and high-gravity ales of all types. Can be estery with warm fermentation temperatures.
Origin:
Flocculation: high
Attenuation: 69-73%
Temperature Range: 55-75° F (13-24° C)
Alcohol Tolerance: approximately 12% ABV

Styles:
American Barleywine
Baltic Porter
Braggot
Christmas/Winter Specialty Spiced Beer
Foreign Extra Stout
Imperial IPA
Old Ale
Other Smoked Beer
Russian Imperial Stout
Scottish Export 80/-
Scottish Heavy 70/-
Scottish Light 60/-
Strong Scotch Ale
Wood-Aged Beer
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:13 PM   #8
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Thanks Tonedef for clearing that up.

I'm ok with "hay" LOL Horse odor could be "off putting" in combination with fruity and cherry.

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Old 01-27-2009, 08:13 PM   #9
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These are Wyeast's recomendations




STYLE: Old Ale

Back to Styles List


Aroma: Malty-sweet with fruity esters, often with a complex blend of dried-fruit, vinous, caramelly, molasses, nutty, toffee, treacle, and/or other specialty malt aromas. Some alcohol and oxidative notes are acceptable, akin to those found in Sherry or Port. Hop aromas not usually present due to extended aging.

Appearance: Light amber to very dark reddish-brown color (most are fairly dark). Age and oxidation may darken the beer further. May be almost opaque (if not, should be clear). Moderate to low head; may be adversely affected by alcohol and age.

Flavor: Medium to high malt character with a luscious malt complexity, often with nutty, caramelly and/or molasses-like flavors. Light chocolate or roasted malt flavors are optional, but should never be prominent. Balance is often malty-sweet, but may be well hopped (the impression of bitterness often depends on amount of aging). Moderate to high fruity esters are common, and may take on a driedfruit or vinous character. The finish may vary from dry to somewhat sweet. Extended aging may contribute oxidative flavors similar to a fine old Sherry, Port or Madeira. Alcoholic strength should be evident, though not overwhelming. Diacetyl low to none. Some wood-aged or blended versions may have a lactic or Brettanomyces character; but this is optional and should not be too strong (enter as a specialty beer if it is).

Mouthfeel: Medium to full, chewy body, although older examples may be lower in body due to continued attenuation during conditioning. Alcohol warmth is often evident and always welcome. Low to moderate carbonation, depending on age and conditioning. Overall Impression: An ale of significant alcoholic strength, bigger than strong bitters and brown porters, though usually not as strong or rich as barleywine. Usually tilted toward a sweeter, maltier balance. "It should be a warming beer of the type that is best drunk in half pints by a warm fire on a cold winter's night" - Michael Jackson. History: A traditional English ale style, mashed at higher temperatures than strong ales to reduce attenuation, then aged at the brewery after primary fermentation (similar to the process used for historical porters). Often had age-related character (lactic, Brett, oxidation, leather) associated with "stale" beers. Used as stock ales for blending or enjoyed at full strength (stale or stock refers to beers that were aged or stored for a significant period of time). Winter warmers are a more modern style that are maltier, fuller-bodied, often darker beers that may be a brewery's winter seasonal special offering.

Comments: Strength and character varies widely. Fits in the style space between normal gravity beers (strong bitters, brown porters) and barleywines. Can include winter warmers, strong dark milds, strong (and perhaps darker) bitters, blended strong beers (stock ale blended with a mild or bitter), and lower gravity versions of English barleywines.

Ingredients: Generous quantities of well-modified pale malt (generally English in origin, though not necessarily so), along with judicious quantities of caramel malts and other specialty character malts. Some darker examples suggest that dark malts (e.g., chocolate, black malt) may be appropriate, though sparingly so as to avoid an overly roasted character. Adjuncts (such as molasses, treacle, invert sugar or dark sugar) are often used, as are starchy adjuncts (maize, flaked barley, wheat) and malt extracts. Hop variety is not as important, as the relative balance and aging process negate much of the varietal character. British ale yeast that has low attenuation, but can handle higher alcohol levels, is traditional.
OG: 1.060 - 1.090+
FG: 1.015 - 1.022+
ABV: 6 - 9+% (occasionally

Vital Statistics:
IBUs: 30 - 60+
SRM: 10 - 22+ lower, particularly for UK winter warmers)

Commercial Examples: Gale's Prize Old Ale, Burton Bridge Olde Expensive, Marston Owd Roger, J.W. Lees Moonraker, Harviestoun Old Engine Oil, Fuller's Vintage Ale, Harvey's Elizabethan Ale, Theakston Old Peculier (peculiar at OG 1.057), Young's Winter Warmer, Sarah Hughes Dark Ruby Mild, Samuel Smith's Winter Welcome, Fuller's 1845, Fuller's Old Winter Ale, Great Divide Hibernation Ale, Hudson Valley Old Man Ale, Cooperstown Pride of Milford Special Ale, Coniston Old Man Ale, North Coast Old Stock Ale

Wyeast Strains:
1028 - London Ale™
1968 - London ESB Ale™
1318 - London Ale III™
1728 - Scottish Ale™
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Old 01-27-2009, 11:48 PM   #10
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I used this in my old ale and liked the result. Especially good if the old ale is a base for Christmas/Spiced Beer IMO:

Wyeast 1187 Ringwood Ale

Great Yeast of European origin with unique fermentation and flavor characteristics. Distinct fruit ester and high flocculation provide a malty complex profile, also clears well. Thorough diacetyl rest is recommended after fermentation is complete.

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