Home Brew Forums

Home Brew Forums (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Recipes/Ingredients (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/)
-   -   October Pumpkin Stout (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/october-pumpkin-stout-9215/)

Cheesefood 05-10-2006 01:53 PM

October Pumpkin Stout
 
Let me know your thoughts on this idea:

~1.5 lbs 100% pumpkin filling
8 ounces Flaked Barley
4 ounces Belgian Special B
16 ounces 60 L Caramel (Briess)
4 ounces Chocolate Malt
3 ounces Roasted Barley
6 pounds amber DME


1 oz Fuggles, whole @ 60
1 oz Saaz, whole @ 30
1 oz Saaz, whole @ 15
1 oz Styrian Goldings, whole @ 10
1 oz Target, whole, @ 5


Extras:
4 oz of real chocolate (added to primary with wort and allowed to melt before adding the cooling water)

1 cinnamon stick (2 inches or so)
1 tbsp Pumpkin Spice

Both added to Primary

Yeast:
1084 Irish Ale Yeast


I'm thinking of brewing this by June to be ready by October. By October, the hops, chocolate and pumpkin should settle down. I imagine this as a perfect mug to sip from while gathered around a bonfire or to serve at a Halloween party.

squatch 05-10-2006 02:38 PM

I have been researching pumpkin ale recipes as well and would like to share a link I found from someone who helped make a 99 gallon commercial batch of pumpkin beer.

http://www.audioholics.com/showcase/DIY/PumpkinAleRecipe.html

This guy has some interesting tips. Anyway, take any advice you read on the Internet with a grain of salt and go with what your good sense tells you.

-Casey

david_42 05-10-2006 02:41 PM

I've tried using chocolate in ales and it doesn't work very well. The fats prevent head formation and the chocolate flavor just isn't there. I've had better luck with chocolate malt.

Based on my experiements with spiced ciders, you'll probably need three or four times as much spice as listed.

As an aside, many people brewed pumpkin ales last fall. Any reports? I'd love to have a good recipe, the commercial pumpkins ales I've had were all disappointing.

Desert_Sky 05-10-2006 03:36 PM

Ill give it a shot with you. Ive been looking around for one to start in mid June early July as well for Halloween. This looks promising, but like David said, more chocolate malt might be a bit better instead of adding chocolate.

Ill be keeping an eye on this thread

Cheesefood 05-10-2006 03:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by david_42
I've tried using chocolate in ales and it doesn't work very well. The fats prevent head formation and the chocolate flavor just isn't there. I've had better luck with chocolate malt.

Based on my experiements with spiced ciders, you'll probably need three or four times as much spice as listed.

As an aside, many people brewed pumpkin ales last fall. Any reports? I'd love to have a good recipe, the commercial pumpkins ales I've had were all disappointing.

I really liked the way my pumpkin turned out. I swapped a bottle with you, right?

I also really liked the way my oatmeal stout turned out. I'd like to up the chocolate flavor (maybe I'll up the chocolate malt instead - comments from the gallery?).

I used 1 tbsp of spice last year and it was just enough. I wouldn't want the flavor any more prominant.

Grimace 05-10-2006 04:06 PM

Here is the recipe my LHBS gave me. I've never tried it, but it looks tasty.

6-# Light malt extract

1-# Honey

1- Lb. Crushed crystal 120L.

1- Lb. Crushed Melanoidin Malt

1/2 Lb. Crushed Honey Malt

1/4 Lb. Crushed Victory Malt

1- oz. East Kent Golding (bittering hops)

1- oz. Fuggles Hops (flavor hops)

1 ea. White Lab East Coast Yeast or 2 ea. / Packs Nottingham Yeast

8 Lb. Cooking Pumpkin, 4 ea. Cinnamon Sticks, 4 Tablespoons Pumpkin Spice (2 used on pumpkin Meat)

1- cup Dry Malt Blend (For Priming)

Pre-clean pumpkin and cut in half. Cut halves again into fourths. Skin meat from rind and cut into one inch pieces leaving the meat sitting on the rind. Place on a baking sheet and sprinkle with 2 tablespoons of the pumpkin pie spice. Bake for 60-75 minutes or until completely cooked. Mash grains in 1 gallon water @ 150 degrees for 30 minutes, sparge with 1 gallon water @ 170 degrees. Add water to pot for 2 gallons volume. Add malt extract. and bring to a boil. Add the pumpkin meat and bittering hops, boil for 55 minutes. Add flavor hops, honey, Cinnamon sticks with remaining spice, boil for 5 minutes. Cool and Strain well before adding into the fermenter. Bottle with Dry Malt Blend, age for 8-12 weeks. Set some aside, it just keeps getting better.

Edited to add: Oops, just noticed you were looking for a stout. I'm not sure you could call this a stout, more of a pumpkin ale.

TDRacing13 05-10-2006 07:20 PM

They make an unreal pumpkin spice ale at the Rock Bottom near me. They put a little brown sugar around the rim of the glass, fantastic. I think Ill join you guys in brewing something for october

Bopper 05-10-2006 07:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grimace
Here is the recipe my LHBS gave me. I've never tried it, but it looks tasty.

6-# Light malt extract

1-# Honey

1- Lb. Crushed crystal 120L.

1- Lb. Crushed Melanoidin Malt

1/2 Lb. Crushed Honey Malt

1/4 Lb. Crushed Victory Malt

1- oz. East Kent Golding (bittering hops)

1- oz. Fuggles Hops (flavor hops)

1 ea. White Lab East Coast Yeast or 2 ea. / Packs Nottingham Yeast

8 Lb. Cooking Pumpkin, 4 ea. Cinnamon Sticks, 4 Tablespoons Pumpkin Spice (2 used on pumpkin Meat)

1- cup Dry Malt Blend (For Priming)

Pre-clean pumpkin and cut in half. Cut halves again into fourths. Skin meat from rind and cut into one inch pieces leaving the meat sitting on the rind. Place on a baking sheet and sprinkle with 2 tablespoons of the pumpkin pie spice. Bake for 60-75 minutes or until completely cooked. Mash grains in 1 gallon water @ 150 degrees for 30 minutes, sparge with 1 gallon water @ 170 degrees. Add water to pot for 2 gallons volume. Add malt extract. and bring to a boil. Add the pumpkin meat and bittering hops, boil for 55 minutes. Add flavor hops, honey, Cinnamon sticks with remaining spice, boil for 5 minutes. Cool and Strain well before adding into the fermenter. Bottle with Dry Malt Blend, age for 8-12 weeks. Set some aside, it just keeps getting better.

Edited to add: Oops, just noticed you were looking for a stout. I'm not sure you could call this a stout, more of a pumpkin ale.

I would think you might want some pumpkin in the primary or secondary...however, I would'nt know how much to put in. I would be worried that boiling it wouldn't impart enough pumpkin flavor. Any ideas for or against?

Also, are you using fresh pumpkin for these brews? Where are you finding it this time of year? I am definitely interested in brewing this recipe.

PT Ray 05-11-2006 02:01 AM

I keep throwing around the idea of a pumpkin lager for the holidays. I have read success stories using pumpkin in the boil but for me the only way to go is in a mash. Throw in a half pound of unmashed flaked barley and I just have to wonder what happens to all that starch. Ontop of that is the oil slick and paraffin left over from the chocolate. I have used chocolate once and would never do it again but would consider cocoa powder in the boil.

I have read and have to agree that the appeal of a pumpkin brew is the orange color and the flavor/aroma of pumpkin pie spice. The actual pumpkin content is more so to justify calling it a pumpkin brew. In the end, go with what feels right.

Lost 05-11-2006 05:00 AM

If you're gonna flavor a beer then my vote goes to wheat malt as a base. Maybe 70/30. wheat/2 row Add the spices in the secondary but don't overdo it, you'll be waiting a long time for it to mellow. You can always add more but you can't take it out.

I haven't made a pumpkin batch yet but have tried a few, the pumpkin taste is always real faint, they tend to taste like pumpkin pie because of the spices and not the pumpkin itself. I would think that whatever pumpkin taste you end up with would be easily overpowered by the more prominent (and harsh) tastes of roasted malts. Of course, I don't care for the harshness of the roasted malts in any of my beers so maybe I'm a bit biased.

My .02


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:59 PM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.