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Cheeto 04-13-2009 09:42 PM

New Hop Variety
 
Quote:


The new hop variety CITRA ?:
The variety Citra, with a alpha acid content
between 10-12% and an oil content of 2-3 %
originated from a cross between the female
European noble aroma variety Hallertauer
mittelfrueh and a male that was derived from the
variety known as U.S. Tettnanger. Citra is 50%
Hallertauer mittelfrueh, 25% U.S. Tettnanger and
the remaining 25% is East Kent Golding,
Bavarian, Brewers Gold and other unknown hops.
Citra has a special flavor and aroma that it
imparts to beer. Depending on the brewing
process and the hopping rate, the flavors and
aromas of beers hopped with Citra might range
from grapefruit to lime, melon, gooseberry, and
lychee fruit.


Older hop Newsletter
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Citra+Hops&aq=f&oq=Citra+Hop

Anyone else see this anywhere?
I know that a forum for Washington brewers was offering some up for "testing", missed out on that.

I am wondering if it is going to be a few years before we can buy it at the LHBS

or have been away too long?

-Jason


HOOTER 04-13-2009 09:44 PM

My only experience with Citra hops is in Sierra Nevada Torpedo IPA, which is very tasty. If I ever find them, I will purchase some no doubt.

Hokie 04-13-2009 09:51 PM

I just read about these hops in the Mid-Atlantic Brewing News newsletter that my LHBS hands out with every purchase. Apparently, homebrewers won't be able to get their hands on them for quite a while. They are only growing them experimentally on 2 acres...bummmmmer. Torpedo IPA is really good though...many tropical flavors and aromas from the Citra.

the_bird 04-13-2009 09:54 PM

It's so interesting how much of a different soil and climate have on a hop's characteristics; I mean, you figure you start with Hallertau and Tettnag and EKG, you're thinking a classic noble-type hop but instead it sounds more in the vein of the classic American hops. Same when you bring Cascade down to Argentina! Location is EVERYTHING, I'm now convinced that there's only one variety of hop and that different varieties just represent different locations!

Cheeto 04-13-2009 09:55 PM

IF they are grown somewhere in Washington or Oregon, I will find them !!

-Jason

travestyofnature 04-13-2009 09:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hokie (Post 1259181)
I just read about these hops in the Mid-Atlantic Brewing News newsletter that my LHBS hands out with every purchase. Apparently, homebrewers won't be able to get their hands on them for quite a while. They are only growing them experimentally on 2 acres...bummmmmer. Torpedo IPA is really good though...many tropical flavors and aromas from the Citra.

Where are these two acres at? I have a shovel and a couple more acres!

Cheeto 04-13-2009 10:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the_bird (Post 1259188)
It's so interesting how much of a different soil and climate have on a hop's characteristics; I mean, you figure you start with Hallertau and Tettnag and EKG, you're thinking a classic noble-type hop but instead it sounds more in the vein of the classic American hops. Same when you bring Cascade down to Argentina! Location is EVERYTHING, I'm now convinced that there's only one variety of hop and that different varieties just represent different locations!


I think you are on to something, I have read about this in other plants, Tulips I think, that is why the best ones come from Holland

billf 04-14-2009 09:41 PM

Terroir - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I think it holds true for a lot of food products. Coffee, tea, wine...and hops.

the_bird 04-14-2009 09:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by billf (Post 1261680)
Terroir - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I think it holds true for a lot of food products. Coffee, tea, wine...and hops.

Well, it's a huge deal in the wine industry, but I've had some terrific wines from the Finger Lakes that are grown from the same types of grapes grown in Germany (like Rieslings), and I can't perceive a huge amount of difference. But, plant some German hops in the same area, and I bet they'd be COMPLETELY different. I'm saying that the effect of region seems to be a lot more dramatic for hops than for many other agricultural products; the differences we're talking about between domestic and Argentinian Cascades, for example, are anything but subtle!

AquaDementia 04-15-2009 02:02 PM

is it possible that sierra nevada has a contract on these hops and owns the right to them?? just a thought.


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