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Old 03-14-2013, 03:45 AM   #1
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Default My first IPA

I came up with my first IPA recipe and want to see what you think.


BeerSmith 2 Recipe Printout - http://www.beersmith.com
Recipe: Unknown IPA
Brewer: Marcus
Asst Brewer:
Style: American IPA
TYPE: All Grain
Taste: (30.0)

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Boil Size: 7.74 gal
Post Boil Volume: 6.24 gal
Batch Size (fermenter): 5.50 gal
Bottling Volume: 5.00 gal
Estimated OG: 1.061 SG
Estimated Color: 9.3 SRM
Estimated IBU: 69.8 IBUs
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75.00 %
Est Mash Efficiency: 81.8 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amt Name Type # %/IBU
10 lbs Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 1 80.0 %
1 lbs Caramel/Crystal Malt - 40L (40.0 SRM) Grain 2 8.0 %
1 lbs Honey Malt (25.0 SRM) Grain 3 8.0 %
8.0 oz Carafoam (2.0 SRM) Grain 4 4.0 %
0.50 oz Warrior [15.00 %] - First Wort 60.0 min Hop 5 26.6 IBUs
1.00 oz Citra [12.00 %] - Boil 10.0 min Hop 6 14.0 IBUs
1.00 oz Simcoe [13.00 %] - Boil 10.0 min Hop 7 15.2 IBUs
1.00 oz Sorachi Ace [12.00 %] - Boil 10.0 min Hop 8 14.0 IBUs
1.0 pkg Pacman (Wyeast #1764) Yeast 9 -
1.00 oz Citra [12.00 %] - Dry Hop 7.0 Days Hop 10 0.0 IBUs
1.00 oz Simcoe [13.00 %] - Dry Hop 0.0 Days Hop 11 0.0 IBUs


Mash Schedule: Single Infusion, Light Body, Batch Sparge
Total Grain Weight: 12 lbs 8.0 oz
----------------------------
Name Description Step Temperat Step Time
Mash In Add 16.02 qt of water at 162.2 F 148.0 F 75 min

Sparge: Batch sparge with 2 steps (1.41gal, 3.92gal) of 168.0 F water
Notes:
------


Created with BeerSmith 2 - http://www.beersmith.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In addition to the above hops I also have centennial.

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Old 03-14-2013, 03:52 AM   #2
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i'd back that down to 1/2 lb honey malt

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Old 03-14-2013, 03:59 AM   #3
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Great job on the first IPA recipe. Listen to lumpher and reduce that honey malt. I might even suggest to drop it down to 1/4lb as its very strong. If you want that honey flavor to really stand out then you can keep it at 1/2. One more thing, reduce the dry hop to 3-4 days. 7 days will work but sometimes you might get some vegetal, steamy or grassy flavors from it sitting on the beer so long. I used to do the standard 7 day as well and find that I get cleaner results with a simple 3-4 day dry hop. Either way, lookin good!

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Old 03-14-2013, 04:04 AM   #4
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Sounds good guys,
I will reduce the honey malt to 1/2 pound. I do want a nice sweetness to the aftertaste as the hops fade so I think I will keep it there.

How about the hops? I have never used any of these other than Citra. Is there a chance the flavors will clash? or do you think they will work good together?

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Old 03-14-2013, 04:42 AM   #5
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From my experience, hops go great with other hops. I know that sounds stupid but as long as you think about what your mixing, it will work. I love to mix and match hops and based on your selection of citra, simcoe with a bit of sorachi, it will be a great citrus, fruit and floral mix from what I can gauge. The sorachi can lend some lemon flavors when using a lot of it but your really not adding that much overall to get that but it will certainly contribute to the citrus fruit flavor. I bitter almost all my beers with either warrior or magnum so I like it where its at and better yet you keeping it realistic with the overall IBU contribution. I like what you did.

Just fYI, if you want more of a sweeter taste just mash a bit higher, say 152-154. I personally like to mash at 148 for 90-120 minutes for MY IPAs to dry out the wort so the hops really shine. A sweeter wort will take away from that hop flavor. I have to warn you about that. I just did an IPA that was sweeter as I used a caramunich as my specialty malt. Don't get me wrong, it was a great IPA and the keg was kicked within about 4 hours of tapping it at a party I threw (at 7.4%ABV people were DRUNK). It was a big hit but I am redoing the recipe (actually brewing it tomorrow) to reduce the sweetness.

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Old 03-14-2013, 01:03 PM   #6
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A bit overdone on the Crystal 40 too, considering you're also using honey malt and carafoam. I would reduce both C40 and Honey malt to 4% each and rid the carafoam completely. This will still be quite sweet and noticeable. You will have no problems with head retention and body without the carafoam. Mash around 154 F for your goals.

Add another oz. to the dryhop, implement a decent post-boil hopstand addition, and for god sakes man, please wait to add that Warrior until you have a full rolling boil if you want a true AIPA. This is your first recipe, and if you start with FWH'ing AIPAs now, then you'll continue brewing them this way. In about 3 years, you will then have to relearn how to brew this style all over again. FWH now and you're shooting yourself in the foot before you even begin. Anyway, that's just my advice having brewed hundreds of IPAs.

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Old 03-14-2013, 01:17 PM   #7
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Thanks everybody for the feedback.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbrews View Post

Add another oz. to the dryhop, implement a decent post-boil hopstand addition, and for god sakes man, please wait to add that Warrior until you have a full rolling boil if you want a true AIPA. This is your first recipe, and if you start with FWH'ing AIPAs now, then you'll continue brewing them this way. In about 3 years, you will then have to relearn how to brew this style all over again. FWH now and you're shooting yourself in the foot before you even begin. Anyway, that's just my advice having brewed hundreds of IPAs.
I am wondering why the stance of not liking the FWH? I have heard it will help the bitterness be more smooth. To me IPAs are not about bitterness but more the flavor and aroma of the hops. It would be great to hear your experience in FWH.
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Old 03-14-2013, 01:35 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeepaholic View Post
I am wondering why the stance of not liking the FWH? I have heard it will help the bitterness be more smooth. To me IPAs are not about bitterness but more the flavor and aroma of the hops. It would be great to hear your experience in FWH.
There are a dozen of other techniques to smooth/round out bitterness (other than FWH) that doesn't involve completely altering the definition of what an IPA is or tastes like. It would be wise to research these techniques if you want to get a complete grasp on different methods before you jump head first onto the FWH bandwagon for your first brew.

FWH transforms one of the only inherently bitter styles of beer into something very different. If you desire a smooth, fruity, almost juice-like beer then your current schedule of 1/2 oz. FWH and then nothing else until 10 min is fine. But if you want something more like a top rated commercial example, then I would advise against the technique.

The FWH process is used to make another process better. It has very little to do with hop bittering or flavoring contributions from the hops added during FWH. It is used for the reason that the wort gravity is at the highest during the 1st run off. Adding hops as soon as the bottom of the boiler is covered with high density wort, breaks the surface tension of the wort and reduces the amount of hot break foam. This allowed the brewer to fill the boiler with a larger quantity of wort, without worrying about boil over. The krausen will be cleaner during fermentation. A decoction uses 5% of the weight of the bittering hops. An infusion uses 10-15%. The reason for the difference in weight, is that during the rests and boiling of the mash in a decoction, proteins that hops need to overcome, are reduced. The process of FWH is for producing a smooth, clean beer. Nothing more. If the finished beer has a smooth, clean hop profile, the process was done correctly. If a rough bitterness is detected, the process failed.

I do have plenty of experience mash hopping, FWH'ing, and traditional bittering. I feel that you need the harsh bittering power of the earlier additions to combat the juicy/fruityness of the late additions. Therefore, I would advice not setting your earlier additions by the wayside or FWH'ing them for this style.
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Old 03-14-2013, 02:25 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbrews View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeepaholic View Post
I am wondering why the stance of not liking the FWH? I have heard it will help the bitterness be more smooth. To me IPAs are not about bitterness but more the flavor and aroma of the hops. It would be great to hear your experience in FWH.
There are a dozen of other techniques to smooth/round out bitterness (other than FWH) that doesn't involve completely altering the definition of what an IPA is or tastes like. It would be wise to research these techniques if you want to get a complete grasp on different methods before you jump head first onto the FWH bandwagon for your first brew.

FWH transforms one of the only inherently bitter styles of beer into something very different. If you desire a smooth, fruity, almost juice-like beer then your current schedule of 1/2 oz. FWH and then nothing else until 10 min is fine. But if you want something more like a top rated commercial example, then I would advise against the technique.

The FWH process is used to make another process better. It has very little to do with hop bittering or flavoring contributions from the hops added during FWH. It is used for the reason that the wort gravity is at the highest during the 1st run off. Adding hops as soon as the bottom of the boiler is covered with high density wort, breaks the surface tension of the wort and reduces the amount of hot break foam. This allowed the brewer to fill the boiler with a larger quantity of wort, without worrying about boil over. The krausen will be cleaner during fermentation. A decoction uses 5% of the weight of the bittering hops. An infusion uses 10-15%. The reason for the difference in weight, is that during the rests and boiling of the mash in a decoction, proteins that hops need to overcome, are reduced. The process of FWH is for producing a smooth, clean beer. Nothing more. If the finished beer has a smooth, clean hop profile, the process was done correctly. If a rough bitterness is detected, the process failed.

I do have plenty of experience mash hopping, FWH'ing, and traditional bittering. I feel that you need the harsh bittering power of the earlier additions to combat the juicy/fruityness of the late additions. Therefore, I would advice not setting your earlier additions by the wayside or FWH'ing them for this style.
Thanks for all of the info. looks like I have more research to do.
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Old 03-15-2013, 03:04 PM   #10
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I think since this is my first ipa recipie I'm going to keep it simple. drop the crystal 40 completely, drop the honey malt to a half pound, up the 2 row 1 pound. mash long and low. I'm not going to try the FWH this time but keep the rest of the hop schedule the same.

now I just need an empty fermenter.

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