Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > My First Amber Ale

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-27-2010, 09:46 PM   #1
Vekta
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: CA
Posts: 34
Default My First Amber Ale

I Finally got all the piece together and have everything I need to make my first brew. I decided to shoot for a 1 gallon batch of a simple Amber Ale. Here is what I have so far, any input would be appreciated.

Overall Batch Volume- 1 US Gallon
Boil Volume- 1/3 Gallon

1 lb. Amber DME
1/2 lb. Light Munich
1/4 lb. CaraHell

1/4 oz. Saaz (AA% 3.9)
1/4 oz. Hallertau (AA% 3.8)

Yeast: US-05

I haven't come to a conclusion on my grain steeping temperature/ duration yet. For the hops I'm thinking of adding them both at the same time and boiling for 35 minutes for the sake of simplicity. According to the calculator I was using to create this I'll need it to get it up there to 25 IBU which would put me within style of an Amber Ale.

Thanks for looking.

__________________

Last edited by Vekta; 04-27-2010 at 10:22 PM.
Vekta is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-27-2010, 11:16 PM   #2
jescholler
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisville, CO
Posts: 553
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Welcome to homebrewing!

Is there a reason why you're only boiling 1/3 gallon? I wouldn't recommend that because you'll probably get a lot of caramalization which isn't usually welcome in an amber ale. If possible start with a little more than a gallon at the beginning of your boil (maybe 1.25 gallons) and boil it down to 1 gallon over the 35 minutes.

The Munich malt needs to be mashed for conversion. A mash is similar to a steep, but with a base malt (such as pale ale malt) at a more controlled temperature and a more controlled water to grain ratio. You can probably do without the Munich malt for this beer. If you really want Munich flavor but without a mash, you can buy Munich malt extract.

__________________
Harsh Bitterness Experiment

Primary: Not until fall :(
Bottle: English Barleywine
On Deck: Session APA, Vanilla Oatmeal Stout
jescholler is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-27-2010, 11:23 PM   #3
JLem
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,641
Liked 168 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I understand the desire to do some small test batches and I hesitate to bring it up since it has nothing to do with your original question and I have no idea what your constraints are in terms of equipment. etc. , but I would suggest trying a bigger batch - maybe something like 3 gallons. A 1 gallon batch will yield you 8-9 bottles of beer and will still take the same time to boil, ferment, and condition as a bigger batch. If it is a great beer you'll hate the fact that you only have 8 bottles. Even if it is a good beer, you'll wish you made more. I've moved away from 5 gallon batches and do mostly 3 gallon batches now. I do partial mashes and partial boils and this allows me to use more grain and less extract and do closer to a full boil than if I do 5 gallons. I get about a case of beer give or take some.

Basically, I'm saying I understand and like the idea of scaling down, I'm just not sure scaling down to only 1 gallon is worth your time and effort.

But if you do go ahead with 1 gallon batches, I definitely agree that you should try to do a full boil.


Last edited by JLem; 04-27-2010 at 11:28 PM.
JLem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-28-2010, 03:54 AM   #4
Vekta
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: CA
Posts: 34
Default

Thank you for that suggestion jescholler. I punched that in the calculator and it gave me the same results. I hadn't tackled the issue of boil-off time yet but that gave me a little bit of a starting point. There was another gentlemen on here that I asked about using Munich in this way, I don't remember his screen name off the top of my head. He said I could get away with it. I suppose what he meant was it's doable in a steep just not ideal.I can only guess he also meant using more of a partial mash technique as well. I got the grains so I might as well use them. Growing pains aye guys?

I'm slowly chipping away at planning this out. I have been reading about partial mashes and may go with something similar to that.Any more suggestions are very welcome.

This is my older sister's equipment that she no longer wants and it did have a 5 gallon carboy with it. I could do a bigger batch I simply choose not to for now. If the few bottles I make are reasonably well received I might make a bigger batch for there sake. For me, it's just about being able to say "Yeah, I've done that before." I've learned a little about archery, I taught myself how to use a straight razor, and successfully planned and then built a 5'x4'x1.5' bird cage working 30 hours straight through. Like all of my "adventures" I started out out small.

Thanks for looking.

__________________

Last edited by Vekta; 04-28-2010 at 04:00 AM.
Vekta is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-28-2010, 10:58 PM   #5
jescholler
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisville, CO
Posts: 553
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vekta View Post
There was another gentlemen on here that I asked about using Munich in this way, I don't remember his screen name off the top of my head. He said I could get away with it. I suppose what he meant was it's doable in a steep just not ideal.I can only guess he also meant using more of a partial mash technique as well. I got the grains so I might as well use them. Growing pains aye guys?
I've given it some thought and my original statement wasn't 100% correct. You won't need a base malt to convert the Munich. It is somewhat unique since it doesn't require a base malt to be mashed. It comes down to how much diastatic power is in the malt if you want to do some research on it. So if you soak at ~154F with ~1.25 quarts of water per pound of grain, then you will be mashing and the Munich will convert. Sorry for the wrong information.
__________________
Harsh Bitterness Experiment

Primary: Not until fall :(
Bottle: English Barleywine
On Deck: Session APA, Vanilla Oatmeal Stout

Last edited by jescholler; 04-28-2010 at 11:05 PM.
jescholler is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-30-2010, 11:09 PM   #6
Vekta
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: CA
Posts: 34
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jescholler View Post
I've given it some thought and my original statement wasn't 100% correct. You won't need a base malt to convert the Munich. It is somewhat unique since it doesn't require a base malt to be mashed. It comes down to how much diastatic power is in the malt if you want to do some research on it. So if you soak at ~154F with ~1.25 quarts of water per pound of grain, then you will be mashing and the Munich will convert. Sorry for the wrong information.
That's ok, it's all apart of working out the wrinkles.

Thanks for the help. That was the missing piece I needed. Hopefully I'll get to cook up some beer this weekend or next.
__________________
Vekta is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
All-Grain - Patriotic Amber Ale (Rogue American Amber) west coast style! humann_brewing American Ale 20 09-15-2012 06:10 AM
Amber DME and Amber liquid extract? SunDevilBrewer Extract Brewing 4 01-08-2010 01:39 PM
All-Grain - Raa (Rye Amber Ale) adamjab19 Amber Hybrid Beer 4 02-15-2009 07:49 PM
Amber - (or Amber-ish) - thoughts? AZ_IPA Recipes/Ingredients 9 11-19-2008 05:25 AM
Red Amber Ale DeusEx Recipes/Ingredients 3 04-10-2008 10:55 PM