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Old 02-24-2007, 04:05 AM   #1
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Default mixing yeasts

Has anyone ever wanted to make a mixed starter? What would happen if you took say a Irish ale yeat and mixed it with a trappist (or whatever) in a starter and just let it go? I assume the yeasts would not fight it out but would contribute equally. But I don't know. Anyone tried this?



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Old 02-24-2007, 04:12 AM   #2
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I've got a german lager, a mexican lager, and a german oktoberfest fermenting together in my Maibock.

It wasn't planned that way, I just had a really badly stuck fermentation.



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Old 02-24-2007, 04:14 AM   #3
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Old 02-24-2007, 06:42 PM   #4
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pjj2ba has it right on the thread that greenhornet referenced. One of the strains would likely out compete the other depending on how close to optimal conditions it is for one of the two yeast strains. If you had robust, healthy starters for the two yeast and pitched at the same time then both yeast might end up at about equal cell #'s but then you have to consider attenuation differences. If you want to try multiple yeast, why not start with one and finish with the second after most of the fermentables are gone.

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Old 02-24-2007, 07:43 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by runhard
If you want to try multiple yeast, why not start with one and finish with the second after most of the fermentables are gone.
Ok that makes sense. Not sure if I will try it but thanks for the clarification.
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Old 02-24-2007, 09:01 PM   #6
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White Labs did it with their 10th Anniversary yeast. They combined WLP001 California Ale, WLP002 English Ale, WLP004 Irish Ale & WLP810 San Francisco Lager, and I brewed with it a couple times and thought it was a decent combinaton. Very clean tasting, with a great ferment.Unfortunately they discontinued it. But I want to make this strain myself, and will be combining those same strains. I want to try combining other yeasts as well.

This is what White Labs says:

Can I combine yeast strains?

Yes, some brewers like to combine strains for more unique flavor profiles. For example, a mellow hefeweizen beer can be produced by combining WLP001 California Ale Yeast with WLP300 Hefeweizen Yeast.

Will there be any benefits or drawbacks from this?

Some of the benefits of blending yeast strains would be to blend flavors or aromas of different strains. Over time one strain can dominate the other so the consistency of flavors would be lost over time. If flocculation is different between the strains, it is hard to collect an equal amount of each strain.

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Old 06-09-2009, 12:42 AM   #7
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Very interesting. Last Friday I pulled my WB-06 from the fridge and decanted the 'beer' off it to make a fresh starter for the Saturday batch ("X" aka Patersbier aka Westmalle Extra).

The problem was I intended to grab the 3787 Trappist High Gravity yeast from the fridge (saved the same way as the WB-06, from a split starter, swirl the starter @ pitching time, save a tube's worth on reserve in the fridge, pitch the rest of the starter in the 6 gallons of wort).

So I made ANOTHER starter for the Trappist I needed. That stuff stinks. I LOVED the beer it makes, but I thought it might have gone rotten my reserve smelled so bad, (possible autolysis) and that was when it was fresh in March! now it did not any smell better - nor worse. However, I recalled the original starter taking 3 days, and stinking till it went off, then it was happy fresh bread smells. Last weekend I was only giving it about 35 hours, and the WB-06 was krausening away smelling fantastic while the 3787 was not getting on with it & stunk in it's stinky cycle. So I pitched all but a split of the 3787, and I did the opposite with the WB-06. I saved MOST of the WB-06, and pitched a bit of that into the X wort. We'll see how it turns out. Happy to report that the blowoff bottle emits the pleasing banana-ish happy aromas that put one at ease, & lends great hope for another fine batch of beer.

Funny thing about that WB-06 - the first batch I did with it kinda stunk along the way, but the end product as very nice! The yeast reserve from that smelled fantastic & reminded me a lot of that beer, and now this batch smells great as well. The first batch was a little different though, more of a straight American Wheat Beer.

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Old 06-09-2009, 04:15 PM   #8
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As far as I know, breweries that use more than one strain per recipe split the batch and ferment them seperately to make sure each yeast is able to do its job fully.

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Old 06-20-2009, 01:54 PM   #9
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What about dry yeast strains? The reason I ask is that I am about to brew a high gravity Winter ale from Midwest. I have one package of Nottingham dry yeast from another kit so I was going to use that as I have good fermentations in the past as well as good flavor profiles.

I used the Mr. Malty pitch rate calculator and it instructs to pitch 1.3 packets (11 gram) of dry yeast. The Nottingham is 11.5 grams but the kit came standard with a 6 gram packet of Muntons yeast. Is it a totally bad idea to mix these yeasts together to pitch? or would it just be better to buy another packet of Nottingham?

I would think it wouldn't make that much of a difference because dry yeasts are not as specialized as liquid yeast strains, but I want to take every measure possible to ensure a good and vigorous fermentation.

Any thoughts?



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