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Old 02-12-2014, 11:29 AM   #1
Brew2Be
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Default Looking for input on american brown ale recipe

Hi every one. I am trying to create an American Brown ale recipe. I have the following so far:

Maris Otter - 1.8 kg (89%)
Crystal 60L - 0.21 kg (10%)
Chocolate malt - 0.09 kg (4%)

Cascade - 8 gr. @ 60 (14 IBU)
Cascade - 8 gr. @ 30 (11 IBU)
Cascade - 10 gr. @ 10 (6 IBU)

Yeast - Nottingham Ale Yeast

est O.G: 1.055
est F.G: 1.012
IBU/O.G: 0.58
IBU: 31
ABV: 6%
SRM: 22
batch size: 9 L


Is it okay to use British malt (such as MO, British chocolate etc.) even though its an American Brown ale? Im thinking the main difference between the classic English Brown ale and the American is the hops used and the amount / addition times? And what about the yeast type? American or English?

Thanks in advance!



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Old 02-12-2014, 01:57 PM   #2
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There are a few different varieties of English brown, which vary in final sweetness and gravity and a number of other more subtle ways. It is true that the modern version of American brown ale tends to be hoppier (that's what makes anything American, right?). But brown ale is a bit of a loose style.

In any event, if you're not entering it into a competition, it doesn't matter how you go about it as long as you get something delicious. For those purposes, I tend to think that the somewhat richer flavor of English grain is a great choice for a brown ale. It depends what you want to play up, though. If you really want to get malty, consider using some Munich (or other moderate-kiln grain like aromatic or Victory) for part of the base malt. Remember, if all you do to make a brown ale instead of an amber or an APA is add a little chocolate, you'll basically just get a dark amber or APA but with a little bit of a toasted note.

So putting all of that together, I think the first thing you want to do here is decide what kind of beer you want:
*clean (American yeast) or estery (British) fermentation?
*residual sweetness (keep this crystal, maybe British yeast, and mash high) or drier (reduce the crystal, use American yeast)?
*rich malty profile (focus a little bit of darker base malt, such as Munich or amber) or grainier one with some toast (reduce the crystal, add some biscuit)?
*hoppy, and if so, more about flavor or aroma?

But hey. That recipe you have there looks like it'll work. Just a question of what you want!



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Old 02-13-2014, 12:28 PM   #3
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For an american brown ale I'd add hops with even more american character - ala. chinook, simcoe, colombus.. I wouldn't want it to end up a "brown american pale ale.."

Mikkellers Jackie Brown is by far the best example I've tasted of an American Brown Ale..

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Old 02-13-2014, 07:24 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motorneuron View Post
There are a few different varieties of English brown, which vary in final sweetness and gravity and a number of other more subtle ways. It is true that the modern version of American brown ale tends to be hoppier (that's what makes anything American, right?). But brown ale is a bit of a loose style.

In any event, if you're not entering it into a competition, it doesn't matter how you go about it as long as you get something delicious. For those purposes, I tend to think that the somewhat richer flavor of English grain is a great choice for a brown ale. It depends what you want to play up, though. If you really want to get malty, consider using some Munich (or other moderate-kiln grain like aromatic or Victory) for part of the base malt. Remember, if all you do to make a brown ale instead of an amber or an APA is add a little chocolate, you'll basically just get a dark amber or APA but with a little bit of a toasted note.

So putting all of that together, I think the first thing you want to do here is decide what kind of beer you want:
*clean (American yeast) or estery (British) fermentation?
*residual sweetness (keep this crystal, maybe British yeast, and mash high) or drier (reduce the crystal, use American yeast)?
*rich malty profile (focus a little bit of darker base malt, such as Munich or amber) or grainier one with some toast (reduce the crystal, add some biscuit)?
*hoppy, and if so, more about flavor or aroma?

But hey. That recipe you have there looks like it'll work. Just a question of what you want!
Thanks for the reply! Definitely some important points (especially about the dark APA thing). I will try reformulating and posting the recipe in this thread for feedback.
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Old 02-13-2014, 07:25 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hjandersen View Post
For an american brown ale I'd add hops with even more american character - ala. chinook, simcoe, colombus.. I wouldn't want it to end up a "brown american pale ale.."

Mikkellers Jackie Brown is by far the best example I've tasted of an American Brown Ale..
Noted. Thanks for the input!
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Old 02-16-2014, 11:14 PM   #6
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So did you brew this and what recipe did you end up using?`



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