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killer_mpg 10-31-2007 06:45 AM

Lactose vs milk
 
I was wondering what the difference was... wouldn't powdered milk be very similar to lactose. How could the yeast tell the difference they don't eat it anyway.

FlyGuy 10-31-2007 06:47 AM

Lactose is a sugar derived from milk, but it is not the ONLY thing in milk. For one, there is a lot of fat in milk, and you wouldn't want that in your brew, just in case you were thinking of using milk instead of lactose powder in a stout or something. :D

killer_mpg 10-31-2007 06:50 AM

I like fat. It makes anything taste better so why not use powdered milk?

FlyGuy 10-31-2007 06:51 AM

Your beer won't like fat. It will end up tasting bad and it will have no head.

You could try it, if you really wanted to, though. I could be wrong....

Just be sure to report back with your findings! ;)

killer_mpg 10-31-2007 06:53 AM

well i am trying cheese's caramel cream ale and i got some lactose and it was expensive.

FlyGuy 10-31-2007 07:00 AM

Well, you could try milk solids or powdered milk. But if it ruins your batch, that would be expensive too! :)

Seriously, you won't need much lactose. Just be glad you weren't brewing a big double IPA and you needed to buy a whole bunch of fresh hops. Now THAT is getting expensive.

Cheers :mug:

pjj2ba 10-31-2007 05:24 PM

I good bit of what powdered milk consists of is the protein caesin. I remember years ago when I lived in CA, walking through the Tied House brewpub in Mountain View and seeing bags of Casein and wondered what they used it for. I just did a quick search and found this.

http://www.craftbrewing.org.uk/techn...chnical-39.htm

Scroll down and it says casein can be used post fermentation to help eliminate chill haze. I've always been a bit curious to try powdered milk in a stout. HOWEVER, if one wants to try this, I'd buy some heat stable dry milk powder that is used in sausage making (I have some for this purpose), otherwise most of the protein would coagulate in the boil pot and would be left in the trub. That might not be a bad thing though.

the_bird 10-31-2007 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by killer_mpg
I like fat. It makes anything taste better so why not use powdered milk?

You like your beers to have head retention? Or, any head at all?

You don't need much lactose. If you're trying to brew on the cheap, Cheese's recipe is probably the single worst one you could pick. It's been widely reported that using imitation extract (which I'm guessing you're going to do, too) is another way of wasting a lot of time, effort, and money; this beer's not my thing, but from the dozens and dozens of accounts I have read of people who have made it, you've got to drop the coin for the right ingredients.

Ó Flannagáin 10-31-2007 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pjj2ba
I good bit of what powdered milk consists of is the protein caesin. I remember years ago when I lived in CA, walking through the Tied House brewpub in Mountain View and seeing bags of Casein and wondered what they used it for. I just did a quick search and found this.

http://www.craftbrewing.org.uk/techn...chnical-39.htm

Scroll down and it says casein can be used post fermentation to help eliminate chill haze. I've always been a bit curious to try powdered milk in a stout. HOWEVER, if one wants to try this, I'd buy some heat stable dry milk powder that is used in sausage making (I have some for this purpose), otherwise most of the protein would coagulate in the boil pot and would be left in the trub. That might not be a bad thing though.

That's flippin' interesting.

srm775 10-31-2007 07:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by killer_mpg
I like fat. It makes anything taste better so why not use powdered milk?

Well, I hope you like rotten fat, because that's what will happen. It will spoil. Ever leave a cup of milk sitting out for a while? That's what will happen to your beer.


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