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Old 11-22-2009, 02:35 AM   #1
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Default Konig Pilsner?

Hi, I'm new to brewing lagers and would like to try a beer that is similar in style to a Konig Pils - beautiful malt flavor, really outstanding. I took a stroll through the recipe database but thought I would also ask for some help in pointing me to a recipe that would be in the Konig Pils style of pilsner. For example, would a 50/50 mix of Munich and Pilsner malts be appropriate for this?

FYI, went to the Konig site and it was of no help. Told me that they use malt, yeast and hops.

Thanks for any advice, links and thoughts.

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Old 11-22-2009, 02:47 AM   #2
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http://www.beertools.com/html/recipe.php?view=3787
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Old 11-22-2009, 03:01 AM   #3
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Pilsner is just that. Leave out the Munich malt. I remember having Konig Pils on tap and it struck me how thick the head was. I might sneak in some flaked barley, maybe 5%. While not Reinheitsgebot flaked barley is a good sub for chit malt and it does a nice job making a thick, creamy head. Without specific info on the hops you could go with a blend of German noble varieties or pick your favorite.

9.5 lbs German Pils malt
.5 lb flaked barley

1 oz Hallertau Hersbrucker @ 60 min
1.5 oz Spalt @ 20 min
.5 oz Spalt @ 5 min

WLP830 German Lager yeast or your favorite

Est OG 1.050, IBU 36

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Old 11-22-2009, 03:03 AM   #4
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Thanks for the link. It shows the grain bill to be 100% pilsner - I suspect that malt-heavy pilsners like Konig use Munich or Vienna, but don't know (hence this thread). Have you tried this recipe? Again, thanks for the link?

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Old 11-22-2009, 03:21 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pappers View Post
I suspect that malt-heavy pilsners like Konig use Munich or Vienna,
They don't. Stick with the pilsner malt and you won't be disappointed.
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Old 11-22-2009, 03:42 AM   #6
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Thanks Ed. So, if the grain bill is only Pils, do the brewers of malty versions of Pilsners rely on higher mash temps to accentuate the malt flavors? Or?

Also, I would not have thought Konig had 34 IBU. Does that seem right?

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Old 11-22-2009, 11:45 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pappers View Post
Thanks Ed. So, if the grain bill is only Pils, do the brewers of malty versions of Pilsners rely on higher mash temps to accentuate the malt flavors? Or?

Also, I would not have thought Konig had 34 IBU. Does that seem right?
The malty flavor comes mainly from the malt, good quality German pilsner malt. High mash temperatures make higher percentages of longer chain sugars, they don't increase malt flavor. I would keep the main rest temp for this beer at 151/152F. While their use has been curtailed to cut costs and time some breweries still employ decoction mashes which would be my preference for this beer style. Mid to high 30s IBU does seem about right. It's been a while since I've tasted a Konig but I remember it having a fairly good bitterness although a little below a Czech pils like Pilsner Urquell.
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Old 11-22-2009, 01:18 PM   #8
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What about a decoction? Is that typical for pilsners to get the big malty flavor?

(I think a pilsner sounds great- I might have to make one so sorry to thread jump, Pappers)

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Old 11-22-2009, 01:38 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew View Post
What about a decoction? Is that typical for pilsners to get the big malty flavor?

(I think a pilsner sounds great- I might have to make one so sorry to thread jump, Pappers)
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While their use has been curtailed to cut costs and time some breweries still employ decoction mashes which would be my preference for this beer style.
As I said earlier I think a decoction mash is the way to go on this style of beer. However, you still need first quality raw material. Decoction mashing IMO will get the most out of the malt and provide the nuances of flavors that you can't otherwise replicate. While there is a large cadre of homebrewers who consider decoctions a waste of time the family at HBT is open minded on the subject.
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Old 11-22-2009, 08:42 PM   #10
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You're not hijacking the thread at all. So, if all pilsners have the same grain bill (100% pilsner) how are some made malt heavy like Konig and others less so, like Trumer Pils? Some combination of mash technique and yeast strain?

Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew View Post
What about a decoction? Is that typical for pilsners to get the big malty flavor?

(I think a pilsner sounds great- I might have to make one so sorry to thread jump, Pappers)
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