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Old 02-22-2013, 01:58 AM   #11
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I agree that might be a lot of crystal but I think it would work fine as long as you like a sweet, malty ipa. I would cut the honey malt in half though. The the other specialty grains are going to give you lots of sweetness and body. Honey malt is great by should be used in moderation.

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Old 02-23-2013, 02:08 PM   #12
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I've decided to reduce the crystal. I don't want a hoppy amber ale, that wouldn't be crisp enough.

I have to admit that I bought the honey malt by mistake. Does it really taste like honey? I've seen descriptions online of a raisin-y taste which is not appealing to me.

Jwood, does the steeping time include chilling time? Also, does this method still maintain the aroma of later additions, or do you get more flavour instead?

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Old 02-23-2013, 10:33 PM   #13
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Honey malt can give a very good actual honey flavor if used in the right proportions in the right recipe but too much can give you a raisin like flavor. I would describe it as more of a sharp sweetness that can overpower much of the other ingredients. I do a honey ipa and never go over around 5% of the grain bill and it comes out awesome. Since you already have a good deal of crystal you won't need a lot for some honey sweetness. I'd cut it in half or leave it out.

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Old 02-24-2013, 06:35 PM   #14
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The steeping time does not include chilling time for the flame-out hops. You end up chilling down below the AA isomerization temperature so fast that the extra time won't make a difference. If I remember correctly, the temperature where AA isomerization stops is about 170-175 degrees F. You'll notice after 40 minutes that you are already closer to that temperature anyways (depending on where you are in the world and what the ambient temperature is like).

These additions add more flavor than anything (I do notice a little more aroma after primaries as well though). However, I've never noticed huge aroma from any beer after primary fermentation. Dry-hopping is a necessity for aroma in pale ales and IPA's and will get you what you are looking for. No late addition (or at least no reasonable amount) can compare to a dry hop aroma wise.

Have a recipe revision to post? I'm curious to see where you are at!

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Old 02-25-2013, 05:08 AM   #15
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Thanks everyone for all the great info. I brewed today. Here's what I did.

I brought the water to
57ppm calcium
6.2 magnesium
118.2 sulfate
22.7 chloride
23 bicarbonate

then...
20 lbs Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 5 79.2 %
1 lbs 8.0 oz Cara-Pils/Dextrine (2.0 SRM) Grain 6 5.9 %
1 lbs 8.0 oz Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L (60.0 SRM) Grain 7 5.9 %
8.0 oz Munich Malt - 10L (10.0 SRM) Grain 8 2.0 %
4.0 oz Honey Malt (25.0 SRM) Grain 9 1.0 %
1 lbs 8.0 oz Corn Sugar (Dextrose) (0.0 SRM) Sugar 10 5.9 %
1.75 oz Magnum [16.50 %] - Boil 60.0 min Hop 11 40.6 IBUs
1.75 oz Centennial [10.00 %] - Boil 15.0 min Hop 12 12.2 IBUs
2.00 tsp Irish Moss (Boil 10.0 mins) Fining 13 -
1.00 oz Cascade [8.30 %] - Boil 10.0 min Hop 14 4.7 IBUs
1.00 oz Chinook [12.10 %] - Boil 5.0 min Hop 15 3.7 IBUs
1.00 oz Cascade [5.50 %] - Boil 0.0 min Hop 16 0.0 IBUs
0.35 oz Amarillo Gold [8.50 %] - Boil 0.0 min Hop 17 0.0 IBUs
1.5 pkg Nottingham Yeast (Lallemand #-) [23.66 ml] Yeast 18 -
1.0 pkg American Ale (Wyeast Labs #1056) [124.21 ml] Yeast 19 -
2.00 oz Cascade [5.50 %] - Dry Hop 14.0 Days Hop 20 0.0 IBUs
2.00 oz Zeus [14.00 %] - Dry Hop 14.0 Days Hop 21 0.0 IBUs

Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 6.9 % Actual Alcohol by Vol: 6.8 %
Bitterness: 61.2 IBUs Calories: 582.4 kcal/l
Est Color: 8.6 SRM

I mashed for a little over an hour at 150 and hit my OG right on at 1.062 (76.3% efficiency which is high for me)
It tasted great so far.

I know that 14 days of dry hopping is long, but I've never been able to taste this "grassy" flavour everyone talks about.

I think I'll carbonate at 2.4 volumes.

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Old 10-19-2013, 05:48 PM   #16
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That beer turned out great! It was a teeny bit too malty, and not quite as bitter as I would have liked but delicious nonetheless. Oh, and as the dry hopping wore off there was a slight alcohol note to the aroma.

After reading all the comments, I was curious about how much more hop flavour and bitterness I would get in a paler beer and I decided to try a very pale american pale ale with lots of late hop additions - like this:

40L Batch

1.97 g Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 2 -
1.49 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 3 -
0.59 g Epsom Salt (MgSO4) (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 4 -
0.10 g Chalk (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 5 -

17 lbs Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 6 94.4 %
8.0 oz Cara-Pils/Dextrine (2.0 SRM) Grain 7 2.8 %
8.0 oz Caramel/Crystal Malt - 80L (80.0 SRM) Grain 8 2.8 %

0.69 oz Galena [12.50 %] - Boil 60.0 min Hop 9 19.9 IBUs
2.00 oz Cascade [5.60 %] - Boil 15.0 min Hop 10 6.9 IBUs
2.00 oz Cascade [5.60 %] - Boil 5.0 min Hop 11 4.3 IBUs
2.00 oz Cascade [5.60 %] - Aroma Steep 0.0 min Hop 12 0.0 IBUs
1.0 pkg American Ale (Wyeast Labs #1056) [124.21 ml] Yeast 13 -
2.00 oz Cascade [5.60 %] - Dry Hop 10.0 Days Hop 14 0.0 IBUs
2.00 oz Zythos [10.00 %] - Dry Hop 10.0 Days Hop 15 0.0 IBUs

This "pale ale" turned out just as hoppy as the IPA. Huge hop flavour and aroma. I found that the lack of residual sweetness made the bitterness just a little harsh. It made me realize I need to pay a lot more attention to the bitterness ratio of my beers.

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Old 10-20-2013, 10:34 PM   #17
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Last beer I made in late spring was a kitchen sink brew,where I literally used up all my ingredients. Turned out to be something between a black IPA and a Foreign stout. Turned out pretty good.

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