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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Kansas City, MO Water Profile help
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Old 06-20-2013, 04:57 PM   #11
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Don't forget that since Ward Labs provides S04 as So4-S that you need to multiply your number by three for the spreadsheets. That's actually moderately high sulfate level, and you may find it a bit too much for light beers like cream ales or light lagers.

Pretty good basic water- I'm jealous!
Thanks, good to know. I love me some hoppy beers.

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Also, that book has not been released. I've talked to Palmer myself about it - seems it just keeps getting pushed back. It was supposed to be this spring, then this September, now I think it's next spring...
Didn't even notice the "preorder" button on Amazon. I had first heard of the book so long ago it didn't occur to me in wasn't out yet. Thanks
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Old 06-20-2013, 06:49 PM   #12
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My water is much harder than yours--and the carbonate is not balanced by the minerals--quite alkaline water here in southern Wisconsin. My water is very suited to dark beers. I contacted Dan Carey brewmaster/owner of New Glarus Brewing a few years back sharing how much I enjoyed their beer--especially a Pils they had recently released and asked how they handle the water around here; I'm about 20 miles from New Glarus. He was great and wrote back a long paragraph--though he said it could have written 20 pages.

They use sour wort from naturally occurring lactic acid from lactobacillus for treating their water in the mash and kettle when they need to have a lower residual alkalinity (e.g.-lighter beers with our water). He mentioned most breweries use some sort of acid when needed, lactic, phosphoric, hydrochloric, sulfuric, etc.. I've been using 88% food grade lactic and Palmer's spreadsheet since then to get a target residual alkalinity for every beer I make--the results have been great! Doesn't really get at your specific water profile, but I thought it was interesting related information.

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Old 06-21-2013, 12:59 AM   #13
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My water report from Ward Labs - fwiw, I live near 435 and Wornall.

pH 9.8
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm 167
Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm 0.28
Cations / Anions, me/L 2.6 / 2.7
Sodium, Na 27
Potassium, K 2
Calcium, Ca 24
Magnesium, Mg 2
Total Hardness, CaCO3 68
Nitrate, NO3-N 0.3 (SAFE)
Sulfate, SO4-S 28
Chloride, Cl 8
Carbonate, CO3 14
Bicarbonate, HCO3 15
Total Alkalinity, CaCO3 36

What I do is use the Bru'n Water spreadsheet (if it's too complicated, post over on the AHA forum - Dr. Martin Brungard will answer any question you have). From that, I've figured out to use lactic acid to lower my ridiculously high pH down to around 6. I also use 0.25 g/gal CaCl2 to get the calcium I need for yeast health and flocculation. I like to keep it simple.
Interesting. Thanks for the info. I'll be purchasing some lactic acid on my next trip to the LBHS . Assuming this is why most of my darker ales turn out great and lighter beers seem to be off or slightly astringent at times. With that in mind, I think a very simple approach is add gypsum for the hoppier styles, lactic acid/CaCl2 for the lighter styles, and keep the water pretty much in line (with an addition of CaCl2) for the darker ales. Sound about right ?
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Old 06-21-2013, 03:57 PM   #14
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Interesting. Thanks for the info. I'll be purchasing some lactic acid on my next trip to the LBHS . Assuming this is why most of my darker ales turn out great and lighter beers seem to be off or slightly astringent at times. With that in mind, I think a very simple approach is add gypsum for the hoppier styles, lactic acid/CaCl2 for the lighter styles, and keep the water pretty much in line (with an addition of CaCl2) for the darker ales. Sound about right ?
That's pretty much what I do minus the gypsum for hoppy styles. I also add Campden tablets for every brew - KCMO likes to put chloromines in the water - makes a nice Band-Aid beer.
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:24 PM   #15
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I was on a Boulevard tour a few weeks back and the brewer mentioned how KCs water was just great for beer. Some folks had questions about water and he said to just use it from the tap and don't worry about it.

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Old 09-07-2013, 03:10 PM   #16
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I was on a Boulevard tour a few weeks back and the brewer mentioned how KCs water was just great for beer. Some folks had questions about water and he said to just use it from the tap and don't worry about it.
That is a gross oversimplification of what they do for water treatment. Also, the brewers don't lead tour groups.
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Old 09-07-2013, 09:15 PM   #17
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I was on a Boulevard tour a few weeks back and the brewer mentioned how KCs water was just great for beer. Some folks had questions about water and he said to just use it from the tap and don't worry about it.
Its good for brewing AFTER a rather involved process, which is simplified in this article: http://inkkc.com/content/water-water...favorite-brew/

As-is, out of the faucet, its not suitable for brewing.
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Old 09-09-2013, 01:18 PM   #18
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As-is, out of the faucet, its not suitable for brewing.
Well if you like plastic phenolics - then yes, this water is great straight out of the faucet.
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