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Old 06-16-2008, 04:31 PM   #1
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Default Irish Red

There seems to be a surprising lack of information on this style around... nothing in Designing Great Beers, and only a few recipes here. I found jezter's BeyerDyke Irish Red, but when I plug the data into BeerAlchemy I get a lot higher OG, FG, etc. Beerrific gave me a good one that I've modified a decent amount to make it simpler.

Since I don't have a mill, even pounds of ingredients make more sense because I won't be wasting anything... I have a few pounds of grain that I let go to waste after my first AG because I didn't brew for a while, sadly. So while I'd really like to have 6 oz of roasted barley, I wound up taking it out because the rest of the pound would probably go to waste.

Here's what I have thus far:

11 lbs Maris Otter
1 lb Caramel 120L

1.25 oz Goldings @60
Wyeast 1084-Irish Ale

Assuming 5.5 gallons at 60% efficiency (it'll be my second AG so I expect to screw things up), that's:

OG: 1.052
FG: 1.014
IBU: 20.5
Color: 16.4 SRM (using Morey; I'm not really sure of the difference, so it's BeerAlchemy's default)

Everything fits within BJCP guidelines. My only worry is that the description says 'generally caramel-like but occasionally toasty or toffee-like in nature,' which would be I assume from the barley. Under ingredients, it says 'Generally has a bit of roasted barley to provide reddish color and dry roasted finish.'

So, while horribly simple, does the recipe look at least sort of ok? And is the barley really necessary, or would it be a lot better with it? I'd like the toastiness, but until I can convince SWMBO to let me get a grain mill I think I may have to be more 'pound of this, pound of that.'

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Old 06-16-2008, 05:31 PM   #2
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why don't you buy a pound of it, uncrushed, and save the remaining 3/4 lb or so? an irish red should definitely have a touch of roasted barley in there and the rest of it will last for months in a sealed container.

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Old 06-16-2008, 05:45 PM   #3
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Well, if I buy it uncrushed, how will I crush it? I've heard you can use a blender or something but that seems... bad. Like I said, I'd like a crusher, and will probably be able to sucker someone into getting it for me for my birthday, but that's two months away and I've got brewing to do afore then

If a red needs the barley then I'll include it... even if I have to waste .75 lbs of it (which I'll do my best to avoid; maybe do a stout to age til Christmastime). The issue I run into then is with color. Even taking out the caramel, 11 lbs of MO and .25 of roasted barley gives me a color of 18.8 which is over style. Is that the sort of thing that's fine? I'm still new to color, so maybe it's nothing to worry about.

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Old 06-16-2008, 05:49 PM   #4
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When you're talking about small amounts like less than a pound, can't you get by with a rolling pin? Not an AG brewer here (yet) but just a thought.

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Old 06-16-2008, 07:34 PM   #5
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woah! i didn't realize how much of the Crystal 120L you have in there. i wouldn't use more than say 1/4 lb of each of that and the roasted barley.

if you buy uncrushed, just use a wine bottle or belgian beer bottle and roll it over the grains inside a ziplock bag. it's very easy to do with small quantities. plus you can have a leftover's batch.

i personally would just save the remaining and make a stout

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Old 06-16-2008, 07:37 PM   #6
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Would that work? It'd certainly be nice for grains under a pound.

I adjusted the recipe to include 1/4 lb of barley. I took the caramel down to a pound of 10L to not affect the color as much but still give the 'generally caramel-like' flavor and aroma. That puts it at 19.4 for the color, which is 1.4 over but I expect not a huge deal.

Another question, while I'm being annoying: the style seems to expect a higher attenuating yeast (my OG is in the middle of the range, but FG is at the very top). Is the Wyeast Irish Ale not appropriate?

Edit: Damn, you got one in before me 1/4 lb of the 120 is darker than 1lb of the 10L, so which would be preferable? And thanks for affirming that I can crush my own <1lb grains... that'll make my life easier

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Old 06-16-2008, 07:51 PM   #7
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120 is also used mostly for color in this recipe, as it will give off a bit of red. you could just knock it down to 2 or 3 ounces. you could still keep a small amount of the 10L as well. play with the quantities and see what you'd like to do. i like to try and keep my stuff to style usually, but as long as it's close you'd probably be ok for competition or whatever. do what works for you.

i like the irish ale yeast for certain beers, such as a few of my stouts, but not for a red. it leaves it a little sweet with a diacetyl flavor. wouldn't be my preference for an irish ale (i've made a few with it and wasn't too into it.) i like my irish red drier...i'd go with nottingham. cheaper, too

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Old 06-16-2008, 08:15 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigafoos View Post
There seems to be a surprising lack of information on this style around... nothing in Designing Great Beers, and only a few recipes here. I found jezter's BeyerDyke Irish Red, but when I plug the data into BeerAlchemy I get a lot higher OG, FG, etc. Beerrific gave me a good one that I've modified a decent amount to make it simpler.

Since I don't have a mill, even pounds of ingredients make more sense because I won't be wasting anything... I have a few pounds of grain that I let go to waste after my first AG because I didn't brew for a while, sadly. So while I'd really like to have 6 oz of roasted barley, I wound up taking it out because the rest of the pound would probably go to waste.

Here's what I have thus far:

11 lbs Maris Otter
1 lb Caramel 120L

1.25 oz Goldings @60
Wyeast 1084-Irish Ale

Assuming 5.5 gallons at 60% efficiency (it'll be my second AG so I expect to screw things up), that's:

OG: 1.052
FG: 1.014
IBU: 20.5
Color: 16.4 SRM (using Morey; I'm not really sure of the difference, so it's BeerAlchemy's default)

Everything fits within BJCP guidelines. My only worry is that the description says 'generally caramel-like but occasionally toasty or toffee-like in nature,' which would be I assume from the barley. Under ingredients, it says 'Generally has a bit of roasted barley to provide reddish color and dry roasted finish.'

So, while horribly simple, does the recipe look at least sort of ok? And is the barley really necessary, or would it be a lot better with it? I'd like the toastiness, but until I can convince SWMBO to let me get a grain mill I think I may have to be more 'pound of this, pound of that.'

From my experience Roasted Barley, while giving you some color will not taste very good. The pound of 120L is perfect for color and a wonderful roasted caramel flavor. Do yourself a favor and add about 6%AA of a citrussy hop as well. I would take the Golding down to an ounce and do the following hop schedule:

Bittering: 1/2 oz Golding / 1/2 oz Cascade (or another Citrussy hop that equals approx. 3%AA)
Last 15 minutes: 1/4 oz Golding / 1/4 oz Cascade (or another Citrussy hop that equals approx. 1.5%AA)
last 5 minutes: 1/4 oz Golding / 1/4 oz Cascade (or another Citrussy hop that equals approx 1.5%AA)

This will make a very yummy red.

Forrest
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Old 06-16-2008, 08:19 PM   #9
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wouldn't the citrusy hops make it more of an american red ale? not that it matters. my last irish red used chocolate malt and 120L (no roasted barley) with fuggle and EKG. it was fantastic.

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Old 06-16-2008, 08:26 PM   #10
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I was really happy with the notty I used in my first Irish Red. Even fermented a bit on the high side at 68 F.

Also, tough to argue with AHB, but I stuck with Williamette. I don't even use citrusy hops in my American amber ale recipe, but that one will be brewed to style by the numbers only. It's meant to still have the flavor profile of an Irish red. I'll save the citrusy hop flavor for APA/IPA.

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