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Old 07-31-2005, 01:43 AM   #1
Cheesefood
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Default Injured Thumb Wheat Ale

JJust cooked this up today. I'll review it in a month.

6 pounds Muntons Wheat DME (9 EBU)
1 pound same DME as above, but minus 1-1/4 cup used to condition m previous batch.
2 pounds honey
.5 oz Mt Hood

Boil for 1:30 hours

.5 oz Saaz
1-3/4 cup orange juice
1 oz coriander
.5 oz Sweet Orange peel
1 cup Pomegranate juice (which I was drinking at the time, and seemed like it would add a little tartness, but I doubt 1 cup in 5 gallons will matter).

15 minute boil.

Threw about 2 gallons of ice in the pot, then dumped it all into my primary. Took an O.G. and it was 1.100. Then I realized I needed another gallon of water. I failed to mix it well and still had an O.G. of 1.045. I'm assuming an O.G. of around 1.080. As soon as the ice finished melting, I'll take a new reading.

I put this on the WYEAST White from my last batch. It tasted really nice, and I really didn't feel like cleaning the carb.

Got it's name because I cut my thumb when I broke the racking cane from the batch that was in the carboy before this one. That one already has a name ("Housewarming White" because I promised to donate it to my friend's move-in party).

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Old 07-31-2005, 08:01 AM   #2
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That looks truly disgusting. I was told on another board not to add honey to the boil since it is alleged to impair the delicate flavor profile. If you want to add honey, do this at the end of the boil.

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Old 07-31-2005, 01:13 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turricaine
That looks truly disgusting. I was told on another board not to add honey to the boil since it is alleged to impair the delicate flavor profile. If you want to add honey, do this at the end of the boil.
Here's what I found from a more reliable source than Some Guy on a Web Site:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Agricultural Information and Issues from IFAS/ University of Florida
HONEY HOTLINE: RESEARCH FROM THE NATIONAL HONEY BOARD
I have had two indications that the Honey Hotline, a service of the National Honey Board Food Technology Program, continues to be a source of information for beekeepers and others. I was able to quickly answer a beekeeper's request concerning honey storage after contacting the hotline. I simply called the 800 number (356-5941) and was sent printed information on the topic.

Dr. Robert Bates, Department of Food Science, University of Florida also received information concerning honey fermentation from Program. It is found in the Honey Hotline, No. 4, 1993.

According to this four-page newsletter, the National Honey Board commissioned a study which recently was completed by Bison Brewing Co. (Berkeley, CA). The company developed five prototype samples of honey ale and stout. The report covered what adjustments are necessary in brewing beer using citrus, sage, clover and buckwheat honeys. In summary, the results include:

1. Honey should be added so that diastic enzymes (alpha and beta amylase) do not degrade the dextrins (non-fermentable carbohydrates) in beer, destroying the texture and body of the end product.

2. Yeast and bacteria in honey are generally not active because of the low water content. However, when honey is diluted for making beer, these microorganisms can grow and adversely affect the end product. Bison Brewing was able to perfect a method to pasteurize honey, preserving its delicate flavor and composition (176 degrees F for 2.5 hours under anaerobic conditions). After pasteurization, the honey is then cooled and added to the beer at high Kraeusen (peak fermentation).

3. Because adding honey will decrease the dextrins in the final product as discussed in number one above, the brewer should use higher saccharification temperatures (154 to 160 degrees F.). A lower original gravity in the wort is also suggested.

4. Honey is generally used in beer brewing because of its distinct aroma and flavor. A subtle flavor is contributed by using 3-10 percent honey per total grain bill and lighter honeys are recommended. At 11-30 percent of total grain bill, distinct flavors develop, and stronger flavored hops, caramelized or roasted malts, spices and other additions should be considered. Over 30 percent of total grain bill, the honey dominates the other flavors in the beer. Stronger flavored honeys in general are recommended because they give distinct flavors, even at low levels.

5. More investigation is needed in heating honey which produces furfurals and derivatives causing off flavors and in ensuring an adequate amount of free amino nitrogen (FAN) necessary to the fermentation process.

In conclusion, according to the newsletter, honey is unsurpassed as an additive in brewing and this activity offers endless possibilities. More information on the research reported above is available from the National Honey Board Food Technology Program, P.O. Box 281525, San Francisco, CA 94128-1525, FAX 415/340-8568.

For those of us that may not be in the micro-brewery scene, honey in beer brewing at first glance appears to be only a minor activity, not responsible for marketing much product. However, there appears to be huge growth potential in this area. According to the above newsletter, in 1992 there were 103 micro-breweries and 191 brew pubs in the U.S. The former are growing at 6 percent annually and the latter increased by a total of 15 between 1991 and 1992. In addition, nearly one million persons make 30-60 gallons of beer at home each year.

Beyond beer, "New Age" beverages and those associated with sports are also good candidates for using honey, according to the newsletter. New Age Beverages are a $195 million market. They are defined as sweetened waters with a "good for you" attitude. Honey holds a "definite" place in a variety of beverage products such as Grizzly Ade, a preservative-free product which is naturally flavored with honey, produced by Pyramid Juice Company (Ashland, OR); Honey 'N Apple Raspberry and Honey N' Cranberry juices from Brookies Food Products (Coral Springs, FL), Barker's Tru-Fruit Juice from Anz-Trade (San Leandro, CA); and Honey Lemonade from Vivaleo (Dallas, TX). (Also see March 1993 and February and March 1995 APIS.
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Old 07-31-2005, 03:59 PM   #4
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Thanks for that info! I'm using honey for the first time in today's brew (1/2 c. during the last 15 minutes of the boil). Although I never thought about how the boil affected it, it's good to have the information behind it.

And calling someone else's brew "disgusting" may just be your opinion, but we're generally a little more supportive around here. If it is disgusting, he'll let us know when he cracks one open a month from now. To me, it sounds interesting and I'd like to hear how it comes out.

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Old 08-03-2005, 03:46 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kephren
Thanks for that info! I'm using honey for the first time in today's brew (1/2 c. during the last 15 minutes of the boil). Although I never thought about how the boil affected it, it's good to have the information behind it.

And calling someone else's brew "disgusting" may just be your opinion, but we're generally a little more supportive around here. If it is disgusting, he'll let us know when he cracks one open a month from now. To me, it sounds interesting and I'd like to hear how it comes out.
Thank you for the support. Yeah, I'm a bit "creative" when it comes to my brewing, but that's just my style. I've never been one to choose an established recipe over my own style. With cooking, I've made some duds, but I've also made some awesome dishes. I make Crab Rangoons that will rival ANYTHING you've ever had at any Chinese restaurant. My home made salsa beats La Preferifda 5 times out of 4. The best stuff is the stuff we make up on our own, right?
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Old 08-03-2005, 05:31 PM   #6
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Looks nice! I've added a pound of honey both at the start of the boil on one batch and during the last 15 minutes of the boil on another. Both turned out fine, but I got more honey flavor with the latter. Turbinado sugar works great in wheat beers, too!

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Old 08-03-2005, 06:15 PM   #7
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Recipe sounds pretty neat. I'm curious to hear if the pomegranate adds any flavor, or if it'll just try to balance out the sweetness. Nice starting gravity and quite a bit of honey...sounds like the yeast are going to love you for it! If it comes out good, don't forget to send some salsa with the brew this way.

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Old 08-03-2005, 11:59 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gaelone
Recipe sounds pretty neat. I'm curious to hear if the pomegranate adds any flavor, or if it'll just try to balance out the sweetness. Nice starting gravity and quite a bit of honey...sounds like the yeast are going to love you for it! If it comes out good, don't forget to send some salsa with the brew this way.
I think I might already be in trouble. I checked it yesterday and it was bubbling nice. But I smelled the banana and bubblegum smell of Wheat beer, and soon realized that the plastic top of my bucket had popped up and wasn't completely sealed. It wasn't off the bucket, just not firmly sealed. I closed it and checked this morning and there was no activity. I'm thinking of getting some champagne yeast to add when I move it to the secondary (which I'm buying this weekend) in case the white die out too soon.
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Old 08-04-2005, 12:41 AM   #9
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How long did it ferment before your discovery? A not-so-tight seal is not the end of the world and should not have negatively affected your beer. Is it possible that the ferment is done? That type of yeast is usually an animal. It's all violent and smelly at first but it usually goes quick.

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Old 08-04-2005, 06:39 AM   #10
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Dont worry, my fermenting bin does not have an air lock, so naturally the lid pops off to release gaseous CO2. Not ideal, but not something to get worried about

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