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Old 02-03-2013, 09:02 PM   #1
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Default I'd like help with this recipe, please!

Hello HBT community! I drank a pint of Deschutes Brewery's Hop Henge the other day and loved it... it was over 10% ABV and 95 IBU's, and it was a great Imperial IPA. I'd like to brew something similar, although slightly different, and I was looking on their website where they list the malts and hop varieties used (http://www.deschutesbrewery.com/recipe/hop-henge-clone) to help me formulate my recipe. Although I've brewed many different recipes, I am still rather new to formulating my own recipes... I'd really appreciate it if some of you wouldn't mind looking over the recipe that I've come up with and letting me know if you have any suggestions!

Target OG: 1.088
Target FG: 1.015 (9.6% ABV)
IBU's: 96.75
Color: 13.0 SRM
Batch Size: 5.00 Gal
Boil Time: 90 minutes

Primary 14 days @ 68.0°F
Secondary 14 days @ 72.0°F
Keg 14 days @ 40.0°F

Grains & Adjuncts
14.00 lbs (71.79 %) Pale Malt (2 Row) UK
2.50 lbs (12.82 %) Munich Malt - 10L
2.00 lbs (10.26 %) Caramel/Crystal Malt - 10L
0.50 lbs (2.56 %) Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L
0.50 lbs (2.56 %) Cara-Pils/Dextrine

Hops
1.00 ozs Magnum - 60 mins
0.25 ozs Centennial - 60 mins
1.00 ozs Centennial - 30 mins
1.00 ozs Northern Brewer - 30 mins
1.00 ozs Cascade - 10 mins
0.25 ozs Centennial - 10 mins
1.00 ozs Amarillo Gold - 10 mins
1.00 ozs Cascade - Dry hop for 14 days
0.50 ozs Northern Brewer - Dry hop for 14 days
1.00 ozs Amarillo Gold - Dry hop for 14 days

Yeasts
Wyeast Labs 1318 - London Ale III

Additions
1.00 tsp Irish Moss - 15 mins Boil

Mash Profile
Sacch' Rest 60 min @ 152.0°F

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Old 02-04-2013, 03:12 AM   #2
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I would say you might want to scale down your crystal malts. Three pounds of crystal malt in a five gallon batch is quite a bit, especially in a big beer. I would take the C10 down to one pound. You could replace it with either more base malt or some simple sugar even.

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Old 02-04-2013, 04:27 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by MachineShopBrewing View Post
I would say you might want to scale down your crystal malts. Three pounds of crystal malt in a five gallon batch is quite a bit, especially in a big beer. I would take the C10 down to one pound. You could replace it with either more base malt or some simple sugar even.
Thanks! Since I am still learning how to formulate recipes, can you please tell me why it'd be a bad idea to have that much crystal malt in a 5 gallon batch? What would it do to the flavor? Also, what about the Munich malt, is that weight okay?
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Old 02-04-2013, 04:42 PM   #4
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Also, I'm a bit confused... I've read many places that you can easily use up to 20% crystal malts, where as other places say that you shouldn't use more than 5%. I think it may come down to personal preference, but I am having a bit of a difficult time figuring out why the jury is still out on this one.

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Old 02-04-2013, 05:55 PM   #5
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It's not so much the flavor that you need to worry about, it is the fermentability. Although flavor does have a role. A beer with that high of an OG is already going to struggle to ferment out into the teens range. Crystal malts are for the most part unfermentable. You can go higher on crystal malts on lower OG beers to build in some extra body and mouthfeel. Some English bitters and milds may have around 20%, but they are 1.035-045 OG. You will have plenty of body and mouthfeel with a beer that big without loading up on crystal malts.

My go to IPA grain bill is usually something like -
80-85% 2-row
10% Munich
5-10% C-10
Sometimes I will drop the munich malt even and go 95-5 with some C-40

You can switch out some of the C-10 with c-60 if you like some C-60 in there. If you go too heavy on the crystals on an IIPA, you will end up with a crystal malt soup and it will hide the hops too much. Plus, you will probably end up with an FG around 1.030. You don't want too much residual sweetness or the beer will be way too sweet even with the IBU load. It just becomes a flavor mess, with nothing really standing out.

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Old 02-04-2013, 06:08 PM   #6
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8-12% Munich
7-10% Crystal 60
The rest, American 2-row... or some mixture of American and English 2-row

Mash temp of about 154 F to account for no use of carapils and higher FG.

Start boil volume will need to be about 8 gallons. End batch = 5.5 gallons with 0.5 lost when bottling.

Bitter well beyond 100 theoretical IBUs.
Big with the Northern Brewer at 90 (2-3 oz.) then again at 45 (1-2 oz)
Add a 1 oz. mid charge of either Milennium or Centennial at 30
2 oz. mix of Millenium and Centennial at 10 min
3 oz. Centennial and Amarillo for a 30 minute flameout/whirlpool
5-6 oz. mixed Amarillo and Cascade for the dryhop

3-4 week primary - 1-2 week secondary

Go with Dry English Ale yeast, WLP007. You'll need a huge, healthy yeast starter. Check out mrmalty or yeastcalc.com

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Old 02-04-2013, 06:11 PM   #7
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Hop Henge definitely had a fair amount of Crystal malt if I remember the bottle I had last year, I'd probably go with 1.5-2 lbs total for that. 2-2.5 lbs of Munich would be a good start as well. As far as the hopping goes, there's going to be a lot of trial and error involved if you really want to replicate Deschutes. I'd say the Magnum and Northern Brewer would be more towards the bittering spectrum of things, and then just load up the back half with the citrusy American hops to your hearts content. Big flameout addition (3 or so oz) and big dry hop (another 3-4 or so oz) is probably where I'd start.

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Old 02-04-2013, 06:40 PM   #8
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Thanks for the suggestions! I've tweaked the recipe a bit based on some more research and your recommendations. I got rid of the NB hops and replaced them with citra hops, as I'd prefer the citrusy notes over the earthy ones that NB gives off. Also, I scaled back the dry hop time from 14 to 7 days, as I am a little worried about getting the grassy flavors. Also, I scaled back the Crystal 10L to one pound and upped the dextrine malt by a quarter pound. The modified grain bill and hop schedule looks like this:

Grains & Adjuncts
15.00 lbs (75.95 %) Pale Malt (2 Row) UK
2.50 lbs (12.66 %) Munich Malt - 10L
1.00 lbs (5.06 %) Caramel/Crystal Malt - 10L
0.50 lbs (2.53 %) Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L
0.75 lbs (3.80 %) Cara-Pils/Dextrine

Hops
1.00 ozs Magnum - 60 mins
0.25 ozs Centennial - 60 mins
1.00 ozs Centennial - 30 mins
1.00 ozs Citra - 30 mins
1.00 ozs Cascade - 10 mins
0.25 ozs Centennial - 10 mins
1.00 ozs Amarillo Gold - 10 mins
1.00 ozs Cascade - Dry hop for 7 days
0.50 ozs Centennial - Dry hop for 7 days
1.00 ozs Amarillo Gold - Dry hop for 7 days
0.50 ozs Citra - Dry hop for 7 days

How's this look? Also, do you think I've got too much of the cara-pils/dextrine malt? I've found that it doesn't contribute much to flavor or sweetness, but really helps the body and the mouth-feel of the beer... Still, I am a novice, so I am looking for feedback.

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Old 02-04-2013, 07:07 PM   #9
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Quote:
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Go with Dry English Ale yeast, WLP007. You'll need a huge, healthy yeast starter. Check out mrmalty or yeastcalc.com
Dig. I love white labs' yeast, but I don't think I've used that particular strain yet. From the website's info, it seems like it'd be a great strain to use, especially with the reported 76-80% attenuation. I will use that yeast instead of the London Ale III by Wyeast.
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Old 02-04-2013, 07:07 PM   #10
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I got rid of the NB hops and replaced them with citra hops, as I'd prefer the citrusy notes over the earthy ones that NB gives off.
Despite their name, "Citra" hops are not really that "Citrusy". They have a very unique tropical focus... with a backend of grapefruit, like most Pacific Northwest hops. There are many other American hops which are better at offering "Citrus" than Citra. If you want pure citrus, you'll get that with Cascade.

Your hops heavily favor middle additions over early additions. For such a big, heavy IIPA, you want more of a focus on early additions. You'll also want a substantial whirlpool/flameout/0 min addition and an even more substantial dryhops.

Quote:
Originally Posted by homebrewbeliever View Post
Also, do you think I've got too much of the cara-pils/dextrine malt? I've found that it doesn't contribute much to flavor or sweetness, but really helps the body and the mouth-feel of the beer... Still, I am a novice, so I am looking for feedback.
For your goals, I would just mash higher. At that moderately high FG, it's not unrealistic that they mashed at 154 F and did not use carapils. The higher mash temp will also allow you to use less crystal yet still maintain the illusion of sweetness given off by the bigger body. But to answer your question... no... 3.80% carapils is not overboard.
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