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Old 04-03-2006, 04:50 PM   #1
sonvolt
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Default I need help with an American Pale Ale recipe

I want to brew an AG American Pale Ale next . . . a really traditional yet hoppy one.

Here is the recipe I have put together so far, and I am looking for advice regarding hopping it.

Grain:
11 lbs 2-Row
.5 lbs Crystal (40L)

Yeast: Safale US-56 (Chico Strain)

As for hops, I would like to stick with the "C"s - Chinook, Centennial, Cascade. How much of each do you guys think I should do? At what times should I put them in?

Which and how much should I use for dry hopping?

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Old 04-03-2006, 04:56 PM   #2
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What kind of OG are you expecting? If it's ballpark 1050 I would aim for the upper 30's in bittering IBU's, and then use a flavoring addition to hit low 40's. 3/4oz at flameout aroma hops, and 1/2-3/4oz dry hops.

At least that works for my tastebuds. Now which hops to use is quite subjective and an area of experimentation and self-discovery...

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Old 04-03-2006, 05:05 PM   #3
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When I am looking to make a style I usually start at the first link below, then head on to the 2nd link for grain ideas. Your grains look good but ya may want to throw in some carapils just for a bit if head retention. Something else I have looking at doing since I started AG beers is when making a specificly american style beer I have been splitting my base malt between 2 and 6 row so maybe you might want to go with 5.5 of 2 row and 5.5 of 6 row. As for the hops I would go 1 oz of each just for managment of inventory. 30 minutes on the Chinooks, 15 minutes on the Centenials, and dry hop with the Cascades.

http://www.bjcp.org/styles04/Category10.html

http://hbd.org/cgi-bin/recipator/recipes


10A. American Pale Ale

Aroma: Usually moderate to strong hop aroma from dry hopping or late kettle additions of American hop varieties. A citrusy hop character is very common, but not required. Low to moderate maltiness supports the hop presentation, and may optionally show small amounts of specialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuity). Fruity esters vary from moderate to none. No diacetyl. Dry hopping (if used) may add grassy notes, although this character should not be excessive.

Appearance: Pale golden to deep amber. Moderately large white to off-white head with good retention. Generally quite clear, although dry-hopped versions may be slightly hazy.
Flavor: Usually a moderate to high hop flavor, often showing a citrusy American hop character (although other hop varieties may be used). Low to moderately high clean malt character supports the hop presentation, and may optionally show small amounts of specialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuity). The balance is typically towards the late hops and bitterness, but the malt presence can be substantial. Caramel flavors are usually restrained or absent. Fruity esters can be moderate to none. Moderate to high hop bitterness with a medium to dry finish. Hop flavor and bitterness often lingers into the finish. No diacetyl. Dry hopping (if used) may add grassy notes, although this character should not be excessive.
Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body. Carbonation moderate to high. Overall smooth finish without astringency often associated with high hopping rates.

Overall Impression: Refreshing and hoppy, yet with sufficient supporting malt.
History: An American adaptation of English pale ale, reflecting indigenous ingredients (hops, malt, yeast, and water). Often lighter in color, cleaner in fermentation by-products, and having less caramel flavors than English counterparts.

Comments: There is some overlap in color between American pale ale and American amber ale. The American pale ale will generally be cleaner, have a less caramelly malt profile, less body, and often more finishing hops.
Ingredients: Pale ale malt, typically American two-row. American hops, often but not always ones with a citrusy character. American ale yeast. Water can vary in sulfate content, but carbonate content should be relatively low. Specialty grains may add character and complexity, but generally make up a relatively small portion of the grist. Grains that add malt flavor and richness, light sweetness, and toasty or bready notes are often used (along with late hops) to differentiate brands.

Vital Statistics:
OG.....................FG..................IBUs... .......SRM......ABV
1.045 - 1.060 1.010 - 1.015 30 - 45+ 5 - 14 4.5 - 6%


Commercial Examples: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Stone Pale Ale, Great Lakes Burning River Pale Ale, Full Sail Pale Ale, Three Floyds X-Tra Pale Ale, Anderson Valley Poleeko Gold Pale Ale, Left Hand Brewing Jackman's Pale Ale, Pyramid Pale Ale, Deschutes Mirror Pond

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Last edited by Pumbaa; 04-03-2006 at 05:10 PM.
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Old 04-03-2006, 05:07 PM   #4
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I would probably use the Chinook only for bittering, the Cascade only for flavor/aroma, and the Centenial in small amounts for both bittering and flavor/aroma.

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Old 04-03-2006, 05:30 PM   #5
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Default mix up the malt

Why not mix it up with the malt a little bit, and add a few other types to your recipe.

Try 3% Malted Wheat & 10% Munich malt added to your recipe for a little flair. It will definitely add complexity to the final product.

I can recommend this hop profile which worked in several 5 gal AG batches of this style that I have done.

Target IBU's- 40
Perle- kettle addition -25 IBU's
Centennial- middle addition -10 IBU's
Centennial- late addition -5 IBU's
Cascade- end of boil
Northern brewers- Dry hop

OG-1.054

Good Luck

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Old 04-03-2006, 05:38 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glibbidy
Perle- kettle addition -25 IBU's
Centennial- middle addition -10 IBU's
Centennial- late addition -5 IBU's
Cascade- end of boil
Northern brewers- Dry hop
Interesting--I'd don't think I'd have ever thought of dry-hopping with Northern Brewer. Do you get a very piney aroma from that? Could be interesting.
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Old 04-03-2006, 05:39 PM   #7
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Awesome - thanks, guys. Here is what I have so far:

Grain
5.5 lbs. 2-Row
5.5 lbs. 6-Row
0.5 lbs. Crystal
0.5 lbs. Cara-pils
Hops
1.0 oz. Chinook (30 min)
1.0 oz. Centennial (15 min)
1.0 oz. Cascade (dry hop)
Yeast
US-56 Safale

Will this be hoppy enough? A did a pale ale a few months back - it was my first AG brew so I went fairly conservative with it to test everything out. As I drink the brew now, I wish I had added more hops. Otherwise it is good - tastes like a lot of domestic yellow beers, but it lacks that powerful hop flavor and aroma that I like in SNPA and other pale ales.

Also - if I use Cascade Plugs for dry hopping, do I still use 1 oz? Should I adjust amounts when using plugs?

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Old 04-03-2006, 05:42 PM   #8
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Where the heck did the 6-row come from? I get right rid of that. You've got nothing in that grist that requires the diastatic power of 6-row.

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Old 04-03-2006, 05:43 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glibbidy
Target IBU's- 40
Perle- kettle addition -25 IBU's
Centennial- middle addition -10 IBU's
Centennial- late addition -5 IBU's
Cascade- end of boil
Northern brewers- Dry hop

Missed your post before I posted last . . . I will add the Munich malt! As for the hop recommendations, how can I convert IBUs into more practical terms? In other words, if I know the AA% of the hops I am buying . . . how can I calculate how many oz. will get me 25 IBUs?

Maybe I should post this question elsewhere . . .
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Old 04-03-2006, 05:45 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron von BeeGee
Where the heck did the 6-row come from? I get right rid of that. You've got nothing in that grist that requires the diastatic power of 6-row.

Pumbaa's recommendation - I assumed that it was for the unique "Americanness" of 6-Row . . . You suggest sticking with the 2-Row?
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