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Old 01-06-2014, 10:09 PM   #11
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There was one other issue that I forgot to mention. There is a huge sediment at the bottom of these bottles which takes away from its otherwise excellent clarity. How can I resolve this issue?

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Old 01-06-2014, 11:25 PM   #12
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There was one other issue that I forgot to mention. There is a huge sediment at the bottom of these bottles which takes away from its otherwise excellent clarity. How can I resolve this issue?
What was your fermentation schedule? How do you handle the dry hop? Did you cold crash? If not I would suggest that.

Also, what size batch is this and is something going on with your efficiency? At 15 lbs of grain for a 5 gal I would expect like a 1.080 beer. I like Jayhem's suggestions with the munich and hops.
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Old 01-08-2014, 12:26 PM   #13
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What was your fermentation schedule? How do you handle the dry hop? Did you cold crash? If not I would suggest that.

Also, what size batch is this and is something going on with your efficiency? At 15 lbs of grain for a 5 gal I would expect like a 1.080 beer. I like Jayhem's suggestions with the munich and hops.
As for fermentation schedule, we fermented in primary for about 6 days, until it dropped to 1.008. We then transferred to secondary for 8 days and dry hopped in secondary for the entire time.

Our efficiency hasn't been great usually around 65-70% so a new recipe, given 11 lbs 2-row, 1lb vienna, 1lb carastan, 1lb Munich, and .5 lbs crystal 60, should give me an og of about 1.052-1.056.

As for the cold crash, you mean after the boil? If so yes we did cold crash with a copper coil (it still took about 45 mins to cool down).
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Old 01-08-2014, 12:42 PM   #14
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No, a "cold crash" is performed after fermentation has completed. It refers to moving the fermenter into a refrigerator to cool it down to 0-4° C (32 - 39° F). This causes any chill haze to form and gradually precipitate out, as well as putting the yeast to sleep and having it also fall to the bottom. For an even clearer beer, dose it with some gelatin after it's reached the cold temperature (usually a day or so) and give the gelatin 2-4 days to work its magic. You'll end up with very clear beer.

For dry-hopped IPAs, I modify my cold-crashing/gelatin protocol a little. I've read that in addition to pulling down particulates and sediments, gelatin can also pull out precious hop oils imparted during dry-hopping. So my IPA schedule is this:

  • Primary ferment in a 6.5 gallon carboy for 2-3 weeks
  • Move fermenter into refrigerator
  • 1 day later, add gelatin
  • 3-4 days later, remove from fridge and rack to a 5 gallon carboy (minimal headspace) leaving sediment behind
  • Allow beer to warm back up to room temperature
  • Add dry hops, wait 7 days
  • Move carboy back into fridge to cold-crash, but NO gelatin this time. Beer should already be very clear, this cold-crash is just to settle out hop flakes and get it cold to prep it for carbonating in a keg
  • Rack beer to a keg and begin carbonating

This gets me VERY clear beer, while preserving all of the aroma from the dry hops.
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Old 01-08-2014, 12:43 PM   #15
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As for the cold crash, you mean after the boil? If so yes we did cold crash with a copper coil (it still took about 45 mins to cool down).

That's not a cold crash, thats called chilling the wort. Cold crashing is after fermentation and and dry hopping is finished, you then proceed to "crash" the temperature down to around 34-35* for 24-48 hours before bottling/racking to keg.




edit: damn, kombat beat me to it lol.


@Kombat
I think I may try your cold crash technique on my next IPA. Quick question, do you only keg? I haven't finished my kegerator yet and am curious if this extended method would have any impact on bottle carbing?
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Old 01-08-2014, 01:25 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kombat View Post
No, a "cold crash" is performed after fermentation has completed. It refers to moving the fermenter into a refrigerator to cool it down to 0-4° C (32 - 39° F). This causes any chill haze to form and gradually precipitate out, as well as putting the yeast to sleep and having it also fall to the bottom. For an even clearer beer, dose it with some gelatin after it's reached the cold temperature (usually a day or so) and give the gelatin 2-4 days to work its magic. You'll end up with very clear beer.

For dry-hopped IPAs, I modify my cold-crashing/gelatin protocol a little. I've read that in addition to pulling down particulates and sediments, gelatin can also pull out precious hop oils imparted during dry-hopping. So my IPA schedule is this:
  • Primary ferment in a 6.5 gallon carboy for 2-3 weeks
  • Move fermenter into refrigerator
  • 1 day later, add gelatin
  • 3-4 days later, remove from fridge and rack to a 5 gallon carboy (minimal headspace) leaving sediment behind
  • Allow beer to warm back up to room temperature
  • Add dry hops, wait 7 days
  • Move carboy back into fridge to cold-crash, but NO gelatin this time. Beer should already be very clear, this cold-crash is just to settle out hop flakes and get it cold to prep it for carbonating in a keg
  • Rack beer to a keg and begin carbonating

This gets me VERY clear beer, while preserving all of the aroma from the dry hops.
Man I wish I had the patience for a double cold crash.
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Old 01-08-2014, 02:03 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by kombat View Post
No, a "cold crash" is performed after fermentation has completed. It refers to moving the fermenter into a refrigerator to cool it down to 0-4° C (32 - 39° F). This causes any chill haze to form and gradually precipitate out, as well as putting the yeast to sleep and having it also fall to the bottom. For an even clearer beer, dose it with some gelatin after it's reached the cold temperature (usually a day or so) and give the gelatin 2-4 days to work its magic. You'll end up with very clear beer.

For dry-hopped IPAs, I modify my cold-crashing/gelatin protocol a little. I've read that in addition to pulling down particulates and sediments, gelatin can also pull out precious hop oils imparted during dry-hopping. So my IPA schedule is this:
  • Primary ferment in a 6.5 gallon carboy for 2-3 weeks
  • Move fermenter into refrigerator
  • 1 day later, add gelatin
  • 3-4 days later, remove from fridge and rack to a 5 gallon carboy (minimal headspace) leaving sediment behind
  • Allow beer to warm back up to room temperature
  • Add dry hops, wait 7 days
  • Move carboy back into fridge to cold-crash, but NO gelatin this time. Beer should already be very clear, this cold-crash is just to settle out hop flakes and get it cold to prep it for carbonating in a keg
  • Rack beer to a keg and begin carbonating

This gets me VERY clear beer, while preserving all of the aroma from the dry hops.
Ok I get the concept. I'm not kegging but bottling instead. I don't see this as having an impact on the process but I figured I'd mention it.

The one issue the my brew partner and I have is that I don't think either of us have the fridge space to cold crash as you've described. So I,ll speak to him and see if we can find a solution.
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Old 01-08-2014, 02:17 PM   #18
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Quick question, do you only keg? I haven't finished my kegerator yet and am curious if this extended method would have any impact on bottle carbing?
Yes, I only keg, but everything I've read says that nothing short of filtering your beer will reduce the yeast cell count below what is necessary to bottle carb. That is, I would expect bottle carbing to still be effective even after double-cold-crashing and gelatin. But I don't have any experience with bottle carbing to back that up.
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Old 01-08-2014, 02:30 PM   #19
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I was thinking efficiency in the 40's but I see you must be doing 6 gal batches.

For clear beer and little sediment I have better luck just keeping it in primary a full 2-3 wks, the trub gets more tightly compacted and I also get less beer loss. If dry hopping I'll do that for about 5 days then cold crash if bottling, if kegging I don't bother with an additional cold crash as it clears well in the keg. For dry hopping with pellets I do use a large bag as I have trouble getting those to settle out sometimes. I think gelatin might not be wise for bottle carbing - I'd research that. I don't use it so no direct experience.

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Old 01-08-2014, 04:01 PM   #20
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I was thinking efficiency in the 40's but I see you must be doing 6 gal batches.

For clear beer and little sediment I have better luck just keeping it in primary a full 2-3 wks, the trub gets more tightly compacted and I also get less beer loss. If dry hopping I'll do that for about 5 days then cold crash if bottling, if kegging I don't bother with an additional cold crash as it clears well in the keg. For dry hopping with pellets I do use a large bag as I have trouble getting those to settle out sometimes. I think gelatin might not be wise for bottle carbing - I'd research that. I don't use it so no direct experience.
Now that I'm reviewing our notes that batch actually had a little problem during the boil. We actually sparged too much and boiled very close to 8 gallons (so much so that some over boiled over the side). I<m readjusting with my calculator now and this is what I'm thinking:

9lbs 2 row
2 lbs of dark munich (20L)
1 lb light Carastan (15L)
1 lb American White Wheat (3L)
.5 Crystal (60L)

That should get me to an OG of 1.055-1.060
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