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Old 09-19-2011, 06:30 PM   #1
HeavyHandedBrewing
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Default honey wheat with sorachi ace hops

I would like some feed back on a reciepe idea. Last year I made a honey wheat with dry wheat yeast. This year I was thinking about using sorachi ace hops in stead of the fuggle and saaz from last year. The recipe was as follows :
5 gallon batch
8 pounds dry wheat extract
5 pounds honey. 2 pounds at 60 min. 3 Pounds at 5 min.
1/2 oz each fuggle and saaz at 60 min and 10 min.
Safbrew s-33 dry yeast

The brew was a little hot, but I also pitched the yeast warm at 80F and a heat wave hit right after cause the brew to ferment at about 80F. I am thinking of dialing back the honey to 3 or 4 pounds for the five gallon batch and using the sorachi ace hops both as bittering and aroma along with making it a bit hoppier than last time. Any coments/suggestions would be appreciated.



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Drinking - red ale, Honey Wheat, Chamomile Ale, Coriander Mead., Chocolate Porter & aging 6-pack of Smoked Porter
Kegged - Hefeweizen & 80 minute IPA

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Old 09-20-2011, 07:05 AM   #2
LexusChris
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Default Sorachi wheat

I was thinking about a Sorachi Wheat beer this summer, and spent some time digging around the boards. A few folks have tried to capture the lemon-y character of Sorachi Ace hops, but it sounds like it could be a bit tricky.

I was kind of left with the impression that using them as a bittering addition would be better than as a late-boil addition.

Hopefully one of them will chime in with some first-hand thoughts. I've yet to brew mine...

My other suggestion is for the honey, which I have used in a couple of wheat beer recipes, and in my meads. Don't boil the honey, just add it after the boil, once it has cooled down below 125-F. (You don't want those delicate aromatics to boil off, otherwise you'll be left with a not so pleasent honey character.)

I would agree with you on reducing the total honey in the recipe. I find that 1# added post boil, gives a nice subtle character. If you like more honey flavor, of course add more!

If at all possible, try to keep your fermentation temp below 70-F... 65-68 would be even better! If you don't have a fridge with temp controller, at least place the fermenter in a tub with cool water and wrap a wet towel/shirt around it. Then place a frozen bottle of water in there each AM & PM until bubbling stops. Controlling internal fermentation temp will greatly improve the beer...

Good luck and let us know what you end up trying!
--LexusChris

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Old 09-20-2011, 12:26 PM   #3
HeavyHandedBrewing
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Default

Thanks for the replay. I usually try to ferment at 65F, or at least keep it under 70F. I made that recipe at the end of last summer and a heat wave hit. My apt. only has one shower and SWMBO, who is tolerant with leaving the fermentors in the kitchen, would not like to have to move 10 gallons of fermenting beer (10 gallon batches now!) which she will not even drink. I now only brew in the fall/winter/spring, which where I live gives me 8-9 good months of brewing a year.
In regards to adding the honey at 125F, don't you worry about contamination? I buy my honey from Cosco ($10 for 5#), and I don't know how will it is pasteurized. Have you ever had an infection due to adding the honey while cooling down the wort?
I do love honey. I have made 4 meads over the years, 3 of which turned out great (the one I have had in my closet for 3 years now, hoping one day it will be better. It is a ginger mead, made with 1# of fresh ground ginger.) I have also used honey in several of my beers, usually adding it with a few minutes left in the boil. I think I will take your suggestion of dialing back the honey, maybe to 1.5 or 2#.

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Rob
Drinking - red ale, Honey Wheat, Chamomile Ale, Coriander Mead., Chocolate Porter & aging 6-pack of Smoked Porter
Kegged - Hefeweizen & 80 minute IPA

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