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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > high gravity stout
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Old 02-24-2005, 07:14 AM   #1
boxerdoglover
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Default high gravity stout

OK so I feel foolish posting this, but I am very perplexed, so I thought I would ask for help. I brewed my 5th or 6th stout today, probably my 25th batch all total. Here's the recipe:

5 lbs Dark Malt Extract
1 lb dry light malt extract
1 lb 2 row pale malt
1 lb chocolate malt
0.75 lb crystal malt
0.75 lb roasted malt
4 oz maltodextrin
5/8 oz espresso roast coffe grounds
2 oz Kent Goldings
1 oz Fuggles
1 teaspoon Irish Moss

I steeped the grains in 2 gallons of water for 1 hour at around 155 degrees F, then removed them and turned up the heat and added the rest of the ingredients, some toward the end of 1.5 hrs. I then chilled the wort, transferred to fermenter and added water to make a total of 5 gal. Here's my problem:
The specific gravity I measured (repeated samples) was 1.122! I have never brewed a batch over 1.070, and have used this recipe before with only very slight alterations (no coffee)- OG 1.059. I am wondering- is it possible that there is a concentration gradient and my sample (from bottom of fermenter) is more concentrated than the batch average? Is this an expected OG and I have had incomplete grain utilization in the past? How much of the sugars do y'all expect to be fermentable??
I am wondering if my yeast will even be able to function with this density. If so, I wonder if I'll have a 12-13% alcohol monster. (I really don't prefer strong beers). Maybe a lot of it is nonfermentable?
Has anyone out there had any experience with beers of this gravity? Should I dilute with water after fermentation is complete? Any thoughts or suggestions?

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Old 02-24-2005, 01:46 PM   #2
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[QUOTE=boxerdoglover]
5 lbs Dark Malt Extract
1 lb dry light malt extract
1 lb 2 row pale malt
1 lb chocolate malt
0.75 lb crystal malt
0.75 lb roasted malt
4 oz maltodextrin
5/8 oz espresso roast coffe grounds
2 oz Kent Goldings
1 oz Fuggles
1 teaspoon Irish Moss
QUOTE]

First, I wouldn't feel foolish posting this...it's what we're all here for. Second, I ran these ingredients through the Beer Recipator, and it churned out an OG of 1.055. A little high for a Stout, but not by much. The only thing I didn't throw in was the 4 oz. of maltodextrine, but I doubt that'd boost the gravity that much. I can tell you that I made an Imperial Stout w/ an OG of 1.095 and it erupted like crazy....

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Old 02-24-2005, 02:40 PM   #3
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Default SG of Stout

I believe that you have a stratified fermentor and need to shake the hell out of it (will also help oxygenate the beer for good yeast propagation). This should bring you back into the ballpark for the SG you are looking for. Also remember that an active fermentation will setup convection within the fermentor and ultimately mix the beer up.

A SG of over 1.100 will not stop the yeast. Most beer yeast will ferment wort until the alcohol concentration hits 12% or 13% ABV. At this point the yeast goes dormant and leaves any additional sugars unfermented (a sweet beer).

Bottom line, Relax have a home brew.

Dave


I am wondering if my yeast will even be able to function with this density. If so, I wonder if I'll have a 12-13% alcohol monster. (I really don't prefer strong beers). Maybe a lot of it is nonfermentable?
Has anyone out there had any experience with beers of this gravity? Should I dilute with water after fermentation is complete? Any thoughts or suggestions?
[/QUOTE]

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Old 02-14-2006, 01:36 AM   #4
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I have a stout going with a 1.122 OG. Seven days later at 1.052. Yeast is supposed to be good to 23% Still too sweet. Will put to seconndary tomorrow.

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Old 02-14-2006, 03:07 AM   #5
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yesterday i brewed the coffee-toffe milk stout(liquid panty remover) that has been discussed here before.
my og was 1.063 including 12 oz of lactose.
i pitched 1 litre of nottingham ale yeast(all my local hbs has).
i had fermentation after 3 hrs.
unfortunately i forgot and left my brew belt on when i went to work today and when i got home at 6pm the temp measured on the outside of the fermenter was
79 degrees!!!
i put the fermenter in the basement(at 65 degrees) to cool off.
bubbling at 120-150 bpm
will the high temp screw up the flavour?
thanks for any replies

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Old 02-25-2006, 06:43 AM   #6
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I had a similar occurrence with my oatmeal-imperial just this week. A 1.092 OG (brother wanted it around 10%), the fermentation hit 79 during one of the days.

I got it cooled back down to an acceptable temp, but I have the same questions you do about it. I should be able to get it in the secondary this Tuesday, 8 days in the primary.

I’m hoping there will be enough character to the brew that the high temp won’t be too detrimental.

Recipe:
11 lbs Pale Malt Extract
1/4 lb Chocolate Malt
1/4 lb Black Patent
3/4 lb Roasted Barley
1 lb Brewers Oats
1 lb Belgian Candi Sugar
1 oz Northern Brewer Hops full boil
1 oz Fuggle Hops mid boil
1 oz Fuggle Hops late boil

Wyeast 1028 London Ale for the better attenuation.
Partial boil topped off to 5gal.

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Old 02-25-2006, 03:50 PM   #7
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Sounds like a lack of mixing. Since you've made it before, it should turn out much the same.

I've made barleywines over 1.100. Most ales yeasts fail around 7-8%. Strong ale yeasts can handle 10-11%, wine yeasts 15-18%, distiller's yeast can go to 22-24%, but I don't recommend them for the initial ferment unless you keep the temperature below 65F.

Very high gravity ales take a long time to ferment and age. I age barleywines two or more years.

A day of high temperature fermentation won't destroy your ale.

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Old 02-25-2006, 06:50 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rod
yesterday i brewed the coffee-toffe milk stout(liquid panty remover) that has been discussed here before.
my og was 1.063 including 12 oz of lactose.
i pitched 1 litre of nottingham ale yeast(all my local hbs has).
i had fermentation after 3 hrs.
unfortunately i forgot and left my brew belt on when i went to work today and when i got home at 6pm the temp measured on the outside of the fermenter was
79 degrees!!!
i put the fermenter in the basement(at 65 degrees) to cool off.
bubbling at 120-150 bpm
will the high temp screw up the flavour?
thanks for any replies
Duh, what's a brew belt? I never heard of that before but then I'm from Oklahoma.
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