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permo 03-12-2010 03:43 AM

Heavily Researched Fat Tire Clone Grain Bill/hop Schedule what yeast?
 
I have been researching a fat tire clone for a few months now, I have read many articles and many quotes and interviews from supposed New Belgium brewmasters. They say they use a clean american yeast, but I don't think they do...there is a taste there, an earthiness of some sort that is not malt related, it is yeast or hops...regardless.

I can say that fat tire is a fantastic session beer, not to assertive, but still keeps you coming back for more..bread crust, earthiness, biscuit, light noble hop/citrus aroma....medium carbonation...just a nice all round beer.


Here is what I have came up with for a grain bill and hop schedule for a 6 gallon batch.


10.00 lb Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 80.00 %
0.50 lb Cara-Pils/Dextrine (2.0 SRM) Grain 4.00 %
0.50 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt - 20L (20.0 SRM) Grain 4.00 %
0.50 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt - 40L (40.0 SRM) Grain 4.00 %
0.50 lb Munich Malt (9.0 SRM) Grain 4.00 %
0.25 lb Biscuit Malt (23.0 SRM) Grain 2.00 %
0.25 lb Special B Malt (180.0 SRM) Grain 2.00 %
1.00 oz Williamette [5.50 %] (60 min) Hops 16.0 IBU
0.50 oz Williamette [5.50 %] (1 min) Hops 0.3 IBU
Mash at 154 for 60


Beer Profile

Est Original Gravity: 1.053 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.015 SG
Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 5.42 %
Bitterness: 16.4 IBU Calories: 235 cal/pint




So the question remains....what to use for yeast? A search of clone kits available on the internet shows a fifty/fifty split between neutral yeast strains and belgian strains......food for thought.

The adventerous brewer part of me says use the Chimay strain and ferment cool...........ramping up temps at the end.

Another part of me says use nottingham or US-05 and ferment on the lower end.

thoughts?

philrose 03-12-2010 06:04 AM

Should be a poll...

I vote Neutral. I don't get phenolics or heavy esthers from theat beer.

willtest 03-12-2010 02:10 PM

My Fat Tire kit came with a neutral yeast, Notty.

Oldsock 03-12-2010 02:30 PM

Wyeast released their actual strain a year or two back as a seasonal ( http://www.wyeastlab.com/VSS4q2007.cfm ). Sadly they don't really give the strain much description. IIRC it was originally the Chimay strain years back, but obviously it has become more neutral since then. Maybe a blend of Chimay (500/1214) and a clean American yeast (001/1056)?

beerfold 03-12-2010 02:46 PM

I would highly recommend using the current Wyeast private collection yeast 3655-PC Belgian Schelde Ale. It is cleaner than most belgian yeasts and will work very well in a fat tire clone. I think it is the De Konnink strain, which some claim is the inspiration for fat tire. I have used this strain and the white labs strain wlp-515 with success in amber ales and belgian pale ales.

permo 03-12-2010 02:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oldsock (Post 1939925)
Wyeast released their actual strain a year or two back as a seasonal ( http://www.wyeastlab.com/VSS4q2007.cfm ). Sadly they don't really give the strain much description. IIRC it was originally the Chimay strain years back, but obviously it has become more neutral since then. Maybe a blend of Chimay (500/1214) and a clean American yeast (001/1056)?

Interesting! I wonder if I might try and blend a little US-05 and Chimay. A little of that chimay yeast flavor might be very nice in there.

jrfuda 03-12-2010 02:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by permo (Post 1939413)
The adventerous brewer part of me says use the Chimay strain and ferment cool...........ramping up temps at the end.

Another part of me says use nottingham or US-05 and ferment on the lower end.

thoughts?

That's my thought regarding the Chimay strain too... It's supposed to give earthy characteristics at the lower end of its range. It's also what led me to use T-58 on my 2-below clone that is currently aging. I let it ferment at 61, versus the mid-70s that most folks let it go, hoping for similair earthy charactersistics. I just bottled it last week, so I'll need another 2 weeks before I could let you know how this experiment went.

Also, I tried a Fat Tire Clone kit before (Midwest's, I think) and used US05 (I think it came another yeast, but used US05). It was only my 4th ever brew and I still had some temp control issues. It tasted nothing like fat tire, and my too hgh fermentation resulted in some off flavors.

However, I think if you brew your recipe with US05 at the lowest possible temp (I think 59) you will be able to really tell how much you're missing of that elusive "Fat Tire/New Belgium" flavor, since you'll be getting minimal yeast flavor in the brew. This will allow you to really asses your recipe and decied if you should use another yeast the next time. Then again, if you can wait 2 more weeks, I can report back on my T58 expirment.

Willie3 03-12-2010 02:48 PM

You could split the beer into two batches. Use the Chimay in one and the US05 in the other and see which one you like best. Then you could brew the one you choose and have 6 gallons of it the second time around.

WW

permo 03-12-2010 02:58 PM

This is a crazy thread for sure. Obviously some of the fat tire magic, if not a good portion of it, is from the yeast. It is obviously of belgian heritage, but fermented cooler to subdue the flavors. I also found a webdoc that quoted the brewmaster saying go heavy with light caramel malts, and go for 16 IBU. I really think I might use chimay at 64 degrees and see what happens.

permo 03-15-2010 02:22 PM

OK, this weekend I had a revelation. I tried a six pack of Boulder Brewings Flashback India Brown Ale. Upon the first sip, I knew it was different. It had that biscuit, roasty, earthy taste that fat tire has. Now this makes me think.

1. The specialty malts listed are chocolate and biscuit. I have used both of these extensively and never got a taste like that, I have used them in varying combinations and by themselves..

2. Boulder brewing is from colorado, maybe they borrowed some yeast from new belgium for this one....


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