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Old 12-30-2008, 05:44 AM   #11
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Terry, do you have any details? What caused bad flavors?

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Old 12-30-2008, 05:56 AM   #12
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Same with barley grains, which will release tannins just like tea if you overheat them (about 175F). Which is why you essentially steep grains to make beer (steep, mash, same thing for the purposes of my anaolgy). Then you throw out the grains and boil the liquor.

Tea is the same way. You steep the tea leaves. Once the grain or leaves are out of the pot, you can boil all you want and no tannins.

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Originally Posted by TerryWendel View Post
Not sure what was mentioned earlier but from what I know of green tea is that boiling it can lead to bad flavors. In my experiences anyways.
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Old 12-30-2008, 06:05 AM   #13
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This can be a very in depth subject. First, what flavors are you trying to get from the green tea. Green tea has a very subtle aroma and flavor. Green tea types can give you very different flavors and aromas. The most famous green tea variety, Lung Ching or Drangonwell for example has a distinct chestnut aroma. Other teas display more floral, or vegetal aromas and flavors.

Green tea is very finiky. I usually brew 2-4 cups of loose leaf tea at a time with 180*F water in an open pot for 2 minutes. I adjust the amount and time depending on the tea. Some insist that the best way to brew tea is in a gawain. This is essentially a small tea cup. Most of the gawain is filled with tea. Hot water is poured over the tea and allowed to steep for up to 15 seconds. This tea is poured into a common pot. More water is pored and allowed to steep for slightly longer. This continues up to 8 times depending on the tea type.

To add a strong green tea flavor to beer, I would stay away from putting leaves into the boil or wort. You will not get proper extraction. I would think a great way to get the flavor would be through the Japanese green tea powder. It is slightly more earthy and vegetal, but would be easier to use in the brewing process.

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Old 12-30-2008, 06:08 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 305guy View Post
If good green tea is made by steeping the leaves in boiling water for 5 minutes
It's not. Green tea should be brewed at a lower temperature than black tea, around 160-190°F depending on personal taste and the specific tea.
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Old 12-30-2008, 06:15 AM   #15
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So maybe steep the tea in the wort on the way to (but before) the boil, then remove the leaves, and boil as normal?

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Old 12-30-2008, 06:48 AM   #16
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So maybe steep the tea in the wort on the way to (but before) the boil, then remove the leaves, and boil as normal?
But by boiling the tea (i.e. your wort), you will completely lose any aromatic character present in the tea.

This is why I think addition post-fermentation would be the way to go, via blending. At the very least, you'd want to add the tea post-boil.
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Old 12-30-2008, 10:05 PM   #17
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Absolutely add it post boil. As far as post-fermentation I don't know. Would it really be green tea beer or beer with green tea added?

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Old 12-30-2008, 10:44 PM   #18
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Not sure how it works with tea, but late hopping preserves aroma, the ideal time being 7 minutes, at least according to the chart I go by.

But I agree that it should be added at flame-out or later. I do think the key is to add already-brewed tea, not leaves or powder to the wort. If you think over dry-hopping an ounce or so of hops can lead to grassy flavors, think about all this tea being dry-tea'd.

Also, good info Edcculus. You are now recruited to the project as green tea expert.

I think a wheat is the best way to go for this as it tends to work well with other flavors. Either that or a light blond ale.

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But by boiling the tea (i.e. your wort), you will completely lose any aromatic character present in the tea.

This is why I think addition post-fermentation would be the way to go, via blending. At the very least, you'd want to add the tea post-boil.
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Old 12-31-2008, 08:48 PM   #19
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I have added loose japanese green tea powder while chilling my wort as the temp gets drops below 180. Worked great, with subtle flavors.

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Old 01-04-2009, 03:52 PM   #20
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I've stayed away from brewing tea or using leaves for the reasons mentioned, but have used matcha green tea powder dissolved in boiled water to bottle-condition a winter ale in combination with spices.

You mentioned you're brewing an AG bavarian Weizen (not an American Wheat), so you're using a traditional weizen yeast strain, yes?

I just brewed a 10 gal AG weizen by triple decoction and split the wort to two carboys pitched with two yeasts- a weizen and an Amer Wheat.
The matcha added desirable subtle aroma and flavor, as well as a slight gritty mouthfeel (compared to same beer without additions) to the winter ale. So with this batch, I'm planning to dry-hop some of the wheat beer with matcha powder and spices and am hoping to get the desirables but leave the gritty texture behind in the fermenter.

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