Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Green Tea Weizen
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-27-2008, 03:07 AM   #1
305guy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 36
Default Green Tea Weizen

I'm working on an all-grain bavarian Weizen with Green Tea, and have a few questions about how to add the tea. I've read that some micros have done it by using pre-made iced tea instead of water during the boil. I'm not sure how much flavor would make it to the bottle so, by that method, should ALL the water used in the boil be tea, or just a fraction of it, and what about the water used during mashing?

I was also thinking about adding the tea near the end of the boil as a substitute for aroma hops. Again, I don't have a clue what an appropriate amount would be, or the pros and cons of each method.

Finally, would the tea have any effects on fermentation?

__________________
305guy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2008, 03:46 AM   #2
pedalmedic
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 139
Default

WAAAAAAAAYYYYYYY above my head, but cool idea.

__________________
Kegged Fat Tire Clone
BottledJava Stout
Primary 1 Raspberry Wheat
Primay 2 Kolsch
secondary air
On Deck kipping fingers crossed for AG 10 gal batch

"Get real man. Most eunuchs have got more balls than you. "
- Lister
pedalmedic is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2008, 03:49 AM   #3
k1v1116
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 971
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

the only advice I can give is steep the tea the same way you would steep grain (below 170f) tea has tannins too and you probably dont want them in your beer.

__________________
k1v1116 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2008, 03:48 PM   #4
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,664
Liked 139 Times on 132 Posts

Default

I've used chamomile in a ginger beer. I just made a quart of tea and added it to the keg. That let me adjust the flavor slowly. I've had commercial jasmine and lavender beers. In both cases, the tea was added post-ferment. It will be really easy to overwhelm a Weizen, so that might be your best approach.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2008, 04:02 AM   #5
Brewinator
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: West Coast IPA
Posts: 104
Liked 4 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Subscribed. I've been wanting to do a green tea wheat, but I am utterly clueless as to how much tea to use. I will look fwd to your results.

__________________
Brewinator is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2008, 06:29 AM   #6
BrewMunster
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 29
Default

Dry hopping maybe? Then again it might not add enough of the flavor to the beer.

__________________
BrewMunster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2008, 07:48 AM   #7
305guy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 36
Default

After doing a little chemistry research on the internet and some more thinking, I found that Green Tea becomes harsh and bitter if let steep too long (something I actually already knew from personal experience). I also remember that the proper method to make iced tea is to steep the tea with hot water, then chill it. Both those facts would lead me away from "dry-teaing", and reinforce the idea of using them at the end of the boil. If good green tea is made by steeping the leaves in boiling water for 5 minutes, why not add the leaves in a hop bag to the last 5 minutes of the boil? As for amount, typical for a cup of tea is ~1.5tsp for 8oz water. Take that up to 5 gallons (640oz) and you get 80 times the amount for a standard cup, or ~120tsp = 2.5 cups for full-strength green tea flavor, and scale that down to taste (maybe half).

__________________
305guy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-30-2008, 04:42 AM   #8
Brewinator
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: West Coast IPA
Posts: 104
Liked 4 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Yes, you want it subtle, so as not to dominate the wheat.

The question is, how do you handle bitterness? Tea is bitter, so you'd have to figure that into the IBU. Maybe you could just pop open a wheat beer with a known or low IBU (like Blue Moon) and add some already-brewed tea to see how much tastes right, and scale it up.

You'd hate to waste a whole 5 gallons of ingredients just as an experiment.

I'd definitely have some takers for this beer if I could do it right.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 305guy View Post
After doing a little chemistry research on the internet and some more thinking, I found that Green Tea becomes harsh and bitter if let steep too long (something I actually already knew from personal experience). I also remember that the proper method to make iced tea is to steep the tea with hot water, then chill it. Both those facts would lead me away from "dry-teaing", and reinforce the idea of using them at the end of the boil. If good green tea is made by steeping the leaves in boiling water for 5 minutes, why not add the leaves in a hop bag to the last 5 minutes of the boil? As for amount, typical for a cup of tea is ~1.5tsp for 8oz water. Take that up to 5 gallons (640oz) and you get 80 times the amount for a standard cup, or ~120tsp = 2.5 cups for full-strength green tea flavor, and scale that down to taste (maybe half).
__________________
Brewinator is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-30-2008, 05:41 AM   #9
Jack
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 343
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I would try one or more of the following ideas:
1. First worst teaing
2. Dissolving your priming sugar in tea
3. Brewing a beer without tea and blending it with tea until you get the taste you want.
4. Brewing a concentrated beer and "top off" with tea after primary fermentation is complete.

__________________
Jack is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-30-2008, 05:51 AM   #10
TerryWendel
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Kennesaw, GA
Posts: 36
Default

Not sure what was mentioned earlier but from what I know of green tea is that boiling it can lead to bad flavors. In my experiences anyways.

__________________
PipeDreams Brewery
Primary: Bipolar Squirrel Nut Brown, No Oats Oatmeal Stout
Secondary: Nada.
Bottled: Scottish 60/, Aunt Gingers XMas Ale, No Play I.P.A.
Kegged: Still dreaming.

"I have a right to nothing which another has a right to take away." - Thomas Jefferson
TerryWendel is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Green Beer? Well its not green, well mabe it is CobraAgent Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 12 05-12-2009 09:59 PM
My Weizen DonArmando Extract Brewing 2 10-10-2008 12:13 AM
weizen temp question? 57degrees for weizen? nuclearguy General Techniques 32 03-27-2008 02:53 AM
Thoughts on this Weizen: Brakeman_Brewing Recipes/Ingredients 13 11-13-2007 02:59 AM
vanilla weizen kevy_kev Recipes/Ingredients 33 05-24-2006 05:45 AM



Newest Threads

New

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS