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Old 12-16-2012, 04:31 PM   #1
jlangfo5
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Default Game of Thrones Inspired Lord of the North Ale

Hey guys! Many months ago I posted a thread on hear about making a medieval style beer that would capture the essences of Winterfell from Game of Thrones.

Sappy Stuff:
When I made that thread I was so green that I pissed grass, with regards to brewing, and couldn't hit a target OG if it smacked me in the ***! Since I have been on here though and have been consulting with you guys my brewing has gotten much more consistent, and I now know at least how much grain to buy!

Beer Stuff (the good part):

From the Original Thread from which this beer was forged.

This is what we tried to captured here:

Quote:
What I am wanting to capture is an Ale that you could imagine being drank in a Norther European Castle at a feast or cold night. I would imagine something that wouldn't be dark like an RIS, but not pale like a whit either. Something that would have a rustic flavor probably a bit cloudy with a big thick head that could be served at cellar temp with oak notes from being stored in a barrel. Imagine a beer that would be made from the fall harvest before a hard winter hit.
This is what we came up with:
Quote:

Ingredient Name------------------Amount
Weyermann Munich Type II-----9 lbs, 0 oz

Weyermann Rye Malt-------------1 lbs, 8 oz

Briess White Wheat---------------1 lbs, 8 oz

Thomas Fawcett Oat Malt--------1 lbs, 0 oz

Simpsons Peated Malt-------------0 lbs, 8 oz

Columbus Pelletts------------------.5 oz @ 60 mins

Nugget Pellets ----------------------.5 oz @ 60 mins

Oak Chips, Toasted-----------------2 oz ~2 weeks

Wyeast Labs Bier de Garde Yeast
The Brew Day (stove fires might or might not have been involved):

I am going to start off by saying that the actual brewing process did not go as well as I would have liked to say the least.

As we were boiling water to mash with, I noticed a more orange than normal glow coming up from under the water pot and noticed that indeed that a grease fire had started inside of the drip pan! Luckily, I was able to put it out with a slurry of flour and water before it got out of hand, but it wasn't a good omen "winter was coming".

When I started my mash (really thick in 5 gallon tun), I had over shot the initial mash temperature, so I added some ice to the tun and tried to stir it all together to reach some sort of average temperature. However, the thickness of the mash made it difficult, and on advice from a sibling, I was told that in the tun, it should reach an average temp soon between the hot and cold spots.

I figured, nuclear engineering major, he has taken two classes of thermo-dynamics right? I figured it should work out all right, well, after 30 minutes we did hit an average temp in the mash, but it was at (135 :0)! Not very conducive to thick heady beer for the Lord of Winterfell to drink!

So, we had a bit of stroke of inspiration from a German Decoation mash. We drained out 2 gallons of the wort and 1/3 of the grain and placed it on the stove (which we had cleaned very well to stop more grease fires!) and brought it to a boil for a few minutes before mixing it back into the mash tun and mixing everything together. After we did this, we hit around 157 on the temp and let it mash for an additional hour.

Everything after that point went pretty much as you would normally expect, we boiled the wort for two hours (one hour to reduce volume to make room for starter, another hour for the hops), we added some whirlock with about 15 minutes left and got the wort nice and chilled before adding our 1/2 gallon starter.

The thing that impressed me the most was that even after all of the hickups we had during this brew we still hit our target gravity at 1.068. We had airlock activity within hours and because of the fermcap we were able to fill the carboy nearly to top and have no blow out or clogged airlock!

I plan on removing the oak chips I added in a hop-sock in about 2 weeks, before racking the beer to secondary so I can wash and keep the yeast for later!

I hope to be able to have this beer ready before season 2 comes out on blue ray for my Game of Thrones Marathon viewing!
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:05 AM   #2
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Default Tasting Time!

So it's now beer tasting and review time! It has been nearly two months now since I brewed this beer! Lets start with a glance at the beer!



Appearance:
Looking at it right here I would call it an opaque copper color with plenty of signs of bubbles coming it, this one is carbed kinda heavily actually. If you shine the light through it, it appears different shades of orange, with it looking brown with no light on it.

Nose:
It's really hard for me to describe even with a flavor wheel, I would call it a slightly tart smell with a slight malty sweet note. One again, hard for me to really call it. Perhaps very subtle vanilla?

MouthFeel:
Co2 bite from the amount of carbonation with a bubbly sensation as you work it around. It also has a pretty full feel to it as well, not bubbly and light, but bubbly with body.

Taste:
It taste like nothing I have ever had before, I get some tartness from the yeast, I think oak from the cubes that I used, the tartness and oak I feel really kinda turned into something unique in it's own respect. At the end you get a malty caramel taste from the Munich malt. What is interesting is that tartness is kinda similar to that of green apple but without all the bite, kinda that thing going on.

Overall:
It taste like nothing I have ever had before, it's good, especailly as the maltyness comes through in the end, but I have no clue really how to describe it beyond what I have tried. Perhaps someone will be able to help in a trade

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Old 01-29-2013, 12:31 PM   #3
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cool, i like unique recipe approaches a lot (what im scouring HBT for right now). all munich with some non barley grains. i bet the peated malt will take time to mellow out. how do you think the biere de garde yeast tastes?

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Old 01-30-2013, 12:11 AM   #4
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Well, as far as the yeast selection goes, It's kinda hard for me to pick out what it contributes exactly in this case, I am pretty sure that the "green apple tartness" comes from the bier de garde I used. I kinda do want to find someone to taste this beer who has some level of experience.

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Old 01-30-2013, 12:24 PM   #5
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oh right should have mentioned, a green apple taste can be due to lack of bottle time. i find i need at least 3 weeks after bottling for a totally good flavour to come out. however "tart"? i dont know

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Old 01-30-2013, 02:03 PM   #6
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Green apple is typically Diacetyl. It may fade, but your first line of defense is a D-rest. That is after primary fermentation slows/finishes bring the beer up to ~70 and let is sit for a few days.

Interesting recipe, I may give it a whirl. Although a lower level of carbonation may be appropriate to emulate a cask conditioned beer.

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Old 01-30-2013, 04:40 PM   #7
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Well, the green apple is kinda subtle actually, and It might be one of the characterestics from the yeast that I used, it is described as follows:

Quote:
Wyeast 3725-PC Bier de Garde Yeast
Beer Styles: Saison, Biere de Garde, Belgian Blonde Ale, Belgian Pale Ale, Belgian Golden Strong Ale
Profile: Low to moderate ester production with subtle spiciness. Malty and full on the palate with initial sweetness. Finishes dry and slightly tart. Ferments well with no sluggishness.

Alc. Tolerance 12% ABV
Flocculation low
Attenuation 74-79%
Temp. Range 70-84°F (21-29°C)
If I was to do it again, I would probally try some other yeast (and/or) mash at a higher temperture to get a sweeter beer. I have found that allowing the beer to set for 30 minutes or so to let the co2 disapate really does help the other flavors come out. I will post new tasting notes soon.
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Old 11-01-2013, 02:10 AM   #8
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allowing the beer to set for 30 minutes or so to let the co2 disapate really does help the other flavors come out. I will post new tasting notes soon.

sounds like a cask ale or nitro push

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Old 11-02-2013, 06:03 PM   #9
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Ccbrewer, you made this beer? Tell me what you think, tell me everything you can. I might try and rebrew it

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Old 11-03-2013, 01:13 AM   #10
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not sure where the "I will post new tasting notes soon." came from, I think I was posting a pm at the same time and got it crossed, I drink.... therefore I get mixed up LOL

I have not brewed this, however was wanting to, or a clone of ommegang and this for a bit of a twist. Let me toss this in beersmith and see what I come up with.

I was thinking cherry and not oak cubes...

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