Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > fermentation time for Kolsch yeast?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-30-2010, 07:28 PM   #1
JLem
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,641
Liked 168 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default fermentation time for Kolsch yeast?

Just curious - generally longer than an American or British ale yeast? Fermenting in low-mid 60s

JLem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-30-2010, 09:29 PM   #2
Brocster
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 284
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JLem View Post
Just curious - generally longer than an American or British ale yeast? Fermenting in low-mid 60s
What type? White Labs, Wyeast or other?

I have had great luck with both, but mainly use the White Labs for my Kolsch.

I would recommend 2 weeks in the primary, then 2 week in the secondary, with a crash cool the last two days to clear up a bit. Fermentation will be done in 7 usually.

One thing...watch our for primary blow offs! That Kolsch yeast can really go crazy. I would HIGHLY recommend you use a blow off tube.

Good luck!
__________________

Bottled: Imperial Hefe, Saison, Apfelwein
Kegged: ESB, Foundation Stout, Brothers English IPA, Kolsch, Bavarian Hefe
Secondary: Abbey Dubbel
Primary: Imperial Cherry Bavarian Hefe, Imperial Cherry Brussel Abbey
On Deck: World Class ESB, BKRye
"People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they just like to pee a lot." -- Capital Brewery, Middleton, WI

Brocster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2010, 12:15 AM   #3
JLem
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,641
Liked 168 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brocster View Post
What type? White Labs, Wyeast or other?

I have had great luck with both, but mainly use the White Labs for my Kolsch.

I would recommend 2 weeks in the primary, then 2 week in the secondary, with a crash cool the last two days to clear up a bit. Fermentation will be done in 7 usually.

One thing...watch our for primary blow offs! That Kolsch yeast can really go crazy. I would HIGHLY recommend you use a blow off tube.

Good luck!
I'm using White Labs. I was planning on leaving it alone for 2-3 weeks, but was curious if it needed closer to the 3 or 2. I had it in my cellar for the first 12 hours or so, but I thought it might be just a bit too cold down there (upper 50s/low 60s) so I moved it somewhere where the temp is a bit higher. I don't see airlock activity yet (~24 hours), but can see a layer of bubbles forming in the carboy (this is my first fermentation in a glass carboy, so I'm pretty excited to see the various stages).

I've only got 3.5 gallons in a 6.5 gallon carboy so I'm going to risk using just the airlock.
JLem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2010, 01:54 PM   #4
Brocster
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 284
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JLem View Post
I'm using White Labs. I was planning on leaving it alone for 2-3 weeks, but was curious if it needed closer to the 3 or 2. I had it in my cellar for the first 12 hours or so, but I thought it might be just a bit too cold down there (upper 50s/low 60s) so I moved it somewhere where the temp is a bit higher. I don't see airlock activity yet (~24 hours), but can see a layer of bubbles forming in the carboy (this is my first fermentation in a glass carboy, so I'm pretty excited to see the various stages).

I've only got 3.5 gallons in a 6.5 gallon carboy so I'm going to risk using just the airlock.
This one really comes down to if you secondary or not. If you just leave in the primary, 3 weeks wont hurt. If you plan on racking to a secondary, I would move after 2 weeks.

Most Kolsch's are pretty simple on both the grain bill and the hops. I jst picked up a Kolsch specific book this week because I want to explore the style. Even in that book there is quite a range of opinions on fermentation times.

Best of luck, I think you will really like the yeast. I am curious on your recipe too. In any regards, the Kolsch beers that I have brewed have been a big hit.

and...it is fun watching! Check out this pick...

__________________

Bottled: Imperial Hefe, Saison, Apfelwein
Kegged: ESB, Foundation Stout, Brothers English IPA, Kolsch, Bavarian Hefe
Secondary: Abbey Dubbel
Primary: Imperial Cherry Bavarian Hefe, Imperial Cherry Brussel Abbey
On Deck: World Class ESB, BKRye
"People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they just like to pee a lot." -- Capital Brewery, Middleton, WI

Brocster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2010, 02:18 PM   #5
JLem
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,641
Liked 168 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brocster View Post
This one really comes down to if you secondary or not. If you just leave in the primary, 3 weeks wont hurt. If you plan on racking to a secondary, I would move after 2 weeks.

Most Kolsch's are pretty simple on both the grain bill and the hops. I jst picked up a Kolsch specific book this week because I want to explore the style. Even in that book there is quite a range of opinions on fermentation times.

Best of luck, I think you will really like the yeast. I am curious on your recipe too. In any regards, the Kolsch beers that I have brewed have been a big hit.
I'm actually brewing an Altbier with the Kolsch yeast - I couldn't wait for the White Labs Alt yeast to be released since I want to lager it for a little while and I need to rely on my naturally cold garage for that (and it's not going to stay that cold for too much longer). This is my first experiment with lagering - I was planning on racking the beer to a secondary once fermentation was done and then cold storing it in my garage for a little while (2-4 weeks?)

Though its not a Kolsch, here's my recipe if you're interested (it's a partial mash, partial boil):

for a 3.5 gallon batch:
OG = 1.052
SRM = 13.3
IBUs = 39.6

2 lbs Pilsner malt
1 lbs Munich II
8 oz German Pale malt
2 oz German Chocolate Wheat malt
2 lbs X-Light DME (add last 15 minutes of boil)
1 oz German Spaltz (5%) - 60 min
0.5 oz German Spaltz (5%) - 30 min
__________________
My Hombrewing Blog

My Beer Cellar
JLem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 12:16 AM   #6
Brocster
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 284
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JLem View Post
Just curious - generally longer than an American or British ale yeast? Fermenting in low-mid 60s

I don't think I answered you well on this one...

From an overall standpoint, it is really about the same as 1056 and a couple of the different British Ale yeasts I have used timewise. I mainly use Wyeast British Ale 1098 for British, and both 1056 and 1098 ferment out about the same time-frame for the same gravity beers, for the most part.

The main thing with the Kolsch is to pseudo lager it towards the end, not to help condition it, but to clarify it. What you will notice is that is takes on almost a wheat like appearance i you don't. You might even consider gelatin, but that is not really needed.

So, treat it like you would any "typical" Ale from a time standpoint, fermenting on the cool side, lower 60's if you can, but cold-crash the beer for a couple of days right before you bottle or keg if possible.

Good luck, and cheers!

__________________

Bottled: Imperial Hefe, Saison, Apfelwein
Kegged: ESB, Foundation Stout, Brothers English IPA, Kolsch, Bavarian Hefe
Secondary: Abbey Dubbel
Primary: Imperial Cherry Bavarian Hefe, Imperial Cherry Brussel Abbey
On Deck: World Class ESB, BKRye
"People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they just like to pee a lot." -- Capital Brewery, Middleton, WI

Brocster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 12:08 PM   #7
JLem
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,641
Liked 168 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brocster View Post
The main thing with the Kolsch is to pseudo lager it towards the end, not to help condition it, but to clarify it. What you will notice is that is takes on almost a wheat like appearance i you don't. You might even consider gelatin, but that is not really needed.

So, treat it like you would any "typical" Ale from a time standpoint, fermenting on the cool side, lower 60's if you can, but cold-crash the beer for a couple of days right before you bottle or keg if possible.

Good luck, and cheers!

It was my understanding that Kolsch and Alts were traditionally lagered like any lager beer. I'm in no rush to bottle this, so any harm in extending the lager period?
__________________
My Hombrewing Blog

My Beer Cellar
JLem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 12:15 PM   #8
DrDirt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 173
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I'm fermenting a Kolsch. I pitched wyeast 10 days ago and it's still at high krausen at 63 degrees, yours could take awhile...

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robsbrew View Post
Awesome man. I think that was the most helpfull post Ive gotten so far. Thank you!
DrDirt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 12:15 PM   #9
Sithdad
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Macungie, PA
Posts: 332
Liked 12 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I made a kolsch a few weeks ago and I fermented for 3 weeks and lagered it for 3 weeks as well. I don't use secondaries, except to lager, and I leave all of my beers in the fermenter for 3 weeks. One of the main points of the style is how clear it's supposed to be. Wyeast Kolsch yeast really dropped out once I lagered it. I can look through the better bottle and see the 12 oz'ers sitting in the back of the fridge.

__________________
Sithdad is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2010, 02:40 PM   #10
kjung
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Chicago Area
Posts: 3,741
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

I use White Labs yeast in my Kolsch, and my Alt as well, and I don't remember the fermentation taking any longer than any other style. I keep it in primary for about a week, rack it to secondary for a couple of weeks, and then lager it for 40 days (Don't ask why. That was just what the original recipe said, and it works well for both styles, so I don't mess with it!)
I've also never had to use a blow-off tube, either.

__________________

Be careful what you wish for, friend, 'cause I've been to Hell, and now I'm back again- Steve Earle

Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.-
Albert Einstein

"Heroism on command, senseless violence, and all the loathsome nonsense that goes by the name of patriotism -- how passionately I hate them!"- Einstein, again

kjung is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fermentation time with lager yeast? Beer is good General Techniques 8 07-26-2013 12:29 AM
Fermentation- 1st time using this yeast- need help!!! kaj030201 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 6 10-20-2008 07:15 PM
avg fermentation time for dry yeast Will95gt Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 11-19-2007 03:14 PM
Time for some Kolsch... HomerT General Chit Chat 2 09-29-2006 08:01 PM
Amount of Yeast vs Fermentation Time Brutus Brewer Extract Brewing 2 08-02-2006 01:29 PM