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Old 12-07-2013, 05:58 PM   #1
slaw
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Default Feedback needed on a wheatwine riff

Brewing this for a local competition specifically for wheatwine with some leeway on the style (not that there really is a formal style) Looking for any feedback, but mainly concerned about mashing for a nice viscous body and yeast selection. There will be plenty of rice hulls, just didn't bother adding it to the recipe.

BeerSmith 2 Recipe Printout - http://www.beersmith.com
Recipe: Misspelt
Brewer:
Asst Brewer:
Style: English Barleywine
TYPE: All Grain
Taste: (30.0)

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Boil Size: 3.70 gal
Post Boil Volume: 3.12 gal
Batch Size (fermenter): 2.50 gal
Bottling Volume: 2.10 gal
Estimated OG: 1.100 SG
Estimated Color: 6.4 SRM
Estimated IBU: 47.3 IBUs
Brewhouse Efficiency: 72.00 %
Est Mash Efficiency: 86.4 %
Boil Time: 120 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amt Name Type # %/IBU
3 lbs Malted Spelt (3.0 SRM) Grain 1 33.3 %
3 lbs Pale Malt, Maris Otter (3.0 SRM) Grain 2 33.3 %
3 lbs White Wheat Malt (2.4 SRM) Grain 3 33.3 %
1.50 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %] - Boil 90.0 Hop 4 38.2 IBUs
0.50 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %] - Boil 30.0 Hop 5 9.1 IBUs
1.0 pkg British Ale Yeast (Wyeast Labs #1098) [1 Yeast 6 -


Mash Schedule: Double Infusion, Full Body
Total Grain Weight: 9 lbs
----------------------------
Name Description Step Temperat Step Time
Protein Rest Add 2.02 gal of water at 132.1 F 122.0 F 20 min
Saccharification Add 1.80 gal of water at 192.6 F 152.0 F 60 min
Mash Out Decoct 1.21 gal of mash and boil it 168.0 F 10 min

Sparge: Batch sparge with 2 steps (Drain mash tun , 0.96gal) of 168.0 F water
Notes:
------


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Old 12-08-2013, 12:39 AM   #2
motorneuron
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Unfortunately I can't give you too much help here, since I have never made a wheat wine. I have made barleywine, though. I wonder if 1.100, 152F mash, no sucrose, and English yeast might run the risk of giving you something too sweet. I know that this sort of beer probably should be sweet. But I'd be concerned that you'll end up with something approaching undrinkable. Bear in mind that with the wheat, you're probably going to have a nice, thick-bodied beer no matter what you do for dextrins. Might be worthwhile to use some sugar in the grist, drop the OG a little, or consider using two yeasts (pitch English on day 1, then pitch a neutral American yeast on day 3 or so). You could also consider upping your IBUs. (Incidentally, the EKG are a great idea, but I don't know if bittering with them makes sense. You could just use something neutral, e.g. Magnum, or at least Northern Brewer, to be a little more effective with your AA%.)

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Old 12-08-2013, 12:47 AM   #3
slaw
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This is great feedback, thank you. Do you think it would be better to do a neutral american yeast instead? Possibly reduce mashing temp? I want to have that nice english barleywine mouthfeel, but I am not tied to the ester production. I really want a malt forward beer. The only reason I used EKG for bittering, was that I made an english barleywine a year ago that was based off JW Lee. I will likely take your suggestions though.

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Old 12-08-2013, 01:13 AM   #4
motorneuron
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Using two yeasts is a somewhat "advanced" technique, but that's just because most people don't do it, not because it's difficult. You just pitch yeast 1--your flavor yeast--as normal. And then pitch yeast 2--your attenuation yeast--after a few days. Yeast 1 will have already attenuated your wort by like 50%, which means it will have made a big flavor impact. And then yeast 2 can take over and attenuate down. If it works, it gives you the best of both worlds. Just make sure to get a good starter for both yeasts.

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