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Old 09-24-2008, 09:50 PM   #1
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Default Double/Imperial Hefeweizen?

Anyone know of a good double/imperial hefe recipe? One of the guys at work was asking if I could make one for him but I cant really find a recipe anywhere. Normally I'd just come up with something on my own but I dont want to chance a crappy batch of beer with all the extra grain that goes into a double.

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Old 09-24-2008, 09:56 PM   #2
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That's because there's no such style as "imperial hefeweizen". The style you're looking for is "Weizenbock".

Give that a shot in Search; I think you'll be more successful.

Prost!

Bob

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Old 09-24-2008, 09:57 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobNQ3X View Post
That's because there's no such style as "imperial hefeweizen". The style you're looking for is "Weizenbock".

Give that a shot in Search; I think you'll be more successful.

Prost!

Bob
A Weizenbock is not like a Hefe at all.

Imperial Hefeweizen Ale - Pyramid Breweries, Inc. - Beer Advocate
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/3818/32926

And who says you need to brew a style? Be creative...be inventive, you're a homebrewer.

EDIT: Sorry I can't help with the style, Hefe's aren't my thing. But I think it would be pretty easy to just up the grainbill to get in the 1.070-1.080 range with a 60/40 wheat/pils blend. Stick with a Hallertauer or something for bittering keeping the same OG:BU ratio as a normal hefe and ferment with good 'ole WY3068
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Old 09-24-2008, 09:59 PM   #4
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Yeah the weizenbocks are a pretty dark beer not resembling a hefeweizen at all. I've been searching the internet all day and haven't found a thing.

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Old 09-24-2008, 10:08 PM   #5
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They don't need to be dark at all. it's a broad style. I have had a few pale/white ones from Germany.

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Old 09-24-2008, 10:12 PM   #6
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Quote:
A Weizenbock is not like a Hefe at all.

Imperial Hefeweizen Ale - Pyramid Breweries, Inc. - Beer Advocate
Um, what?

There are dozens more BA-listed beers if you search "Weizenbock" which have descriptors in color and flavor that are simply bigger, badder hefeweizen. Conversely, there are two beers listed as "Imperial Hefeweizen" - the one you listed and the one from Big Rock brewpub. Thus we can dismiss that use of the "style" descriptor as marketing a trendy name amongst beer enthusiasts.

Victory's Moonglow, Ramstein's Winter Wheat and Schneider's Aventinus are all pale Weizenbocks.

Seems to me a Weizenbock, according to the commercial benchmarks, is exactly like a Hefeweizen, 'cept bigger.

Of course, I argue from the perspective of being sick unto a shuddering, raspy death of everything that's a "bigger, faster, louder MORE" version of an accepted style being labeled "Imperial". I think calling a stupidly large flavorbomb of a hoppy beer an "Imperial Imperial Pale Ale" as dumb as saying "VIN number". In this case, calling it "Imperial Hefeweizen" is dumb, because you can call it "Weizenbock."

Cheers,

Bob

EDITED TO ADD:
Quote:
I think calling a stupidly large flavorbomb of a hoppy beer an "Imperial Imperial Pale Ale" as dumb as saying "VIN number".
I was taking my evening constitutional with my wife after typing this, and I realized as I told her the story how stupid this statement was. "Imperial India Pale Ale" isn't such a stupid thing to say, and I'll pretend I didn't say the bit vehicle identification number.

"Imperial Stout" makes sense, as that style of strong stout was brewed for the Tsar's Imperial court in the 19th century. In fact, IIRC, the original bottled brand had "Imperial" on the label.

"Imperial India Pale Ale" makes a certain amount of sense, because India was part of the British Empire.

"Imperial Witbier" makes me want to hurl, because Belgium didn't even have an empire, unless you count the three weeks they held the Congo.

Calling a big beer "Imperial" is trendy. That's what makes me itch. Call it a "Double" or something, like "Doppelbock". "Dobbel Wit" is clever and impressively Fleming; "Imperial Wit" is trendy and buzz-word.
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Old 09-24-2008, 10:13 PM   #7
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Quote:
They don't need to be dark at all.
Yup. Here's a good one:
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Old 09-25-2008, 01:17 AM   #8
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15A. Weizen/Weissbier

Aroma: Moderate to strong phenols (usually clove) and fruity esters (usually banana). The balance and intensity of the phenol and ester components can vary but the best examples are reasonably balanced and fairly prominent. Noble hop character ranges from low to none. A light to moderate wheat aroma (which might be perceived as bready or grainy) may be present but other malt characteristics should not. No diacetyl or DMS. Optional, but acceptable, aromatics can include a light, citrusy tartness, a light to moderate vanilla character, and/or a low bubblegum aroma. None of these optional characteristics should be high or dominant, but often can add to the complexity and balance.

Appearance: Pale straw to very dark gold in color. A very thick, moussy, long-lasting white head is characteristic. The high protein content of wheat impairs clarity in an unfiltered beer, although the level of haze is somewhat variable. A beer “mit hefe” is also cloudy from suspended yeast sediment (which should be roused before drinking). The filtered Krystal version has no yeast and is brilliantly clear.

Flavor: Low to moderately strong banana and clove flavor. The balance and intensity of the phenol and ester components can vary but the best examples are reasonably balanced and fairly prominent. Optionally, a very light to moderate vanilla character and/or low bubblegum notes can accentuate the banana flavor, sweetness and roundness; neither should be dominant if present. The soft, somewhat bready or grainy flavor of wheat is complementary, as is a slightly sweet Pils malt character. Hop flavor is very low to none, and hop bitterness is very low to moderately low. A tart, citrusy character from yeast and high carbonation is often present. Well rounded, flavorful palate with a relatively dry finish. No diacetyl or DMS.

Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body; never heavy. Suspended yeast may increase the perception of body. The texture of wheat imparts the sensation of a fluffy, creamy fullness that may progress to a light, spritzy finish aided by high carbonation. Always effervescent.

Overall Impression: A pale, spicy, fruity, refreshing wheat-based ale.


15C. Weizenbock

Aroma: Rich, bock-like melanoidins and bready malt combined with a powerful aroma of dark fruit (plums, prunes, raisins or grapes). Moderate to strong phenols (most commonly vanilla and/or clove) add complexity, and some banana esters may also be present. A moderate aroma of alcohol is common, although never solventy. No hop aroma, diacetyl or DMS.

Appearance: Dark amber to dark, ruby brown in color. A very thick, moussy, long-lasting light tan head is characteristic. The high protein content of wheat impairs clarity in this traditionally unfiltered style, although the level of haze is somewhat variable. The suspended yeast sediment (which should be roused before drinking) also contributes to the cloudiness.

Flavor: A complex marriage of rich, bock-like melanoidins, dark fruit, spicy clove-like phenols, light banana and/or vanilla, and a moderate wheat flavor. The malty, bready flavor of wheat is further enhanced by the copious use of Munich and/or Vienna malts. May have a slightly sweet palate, and a light chocolate character is sometimes found (although a roasted character is inappropriate). A faintly tart character may optionally be present. Hop flavor is absent, and hop bitterness is low. The wheat, malt, and yeast character dominate the palate, and the alcohol helps balance the finish. Well-aged examples may show some sherry-like oxidation as a point of complexity. No diacetyl or DMS.

Mouthfeel: Medium-full to full body. A creamy sensation is typical, as is the warming sensation of substantial alcohol content. The presence of Munich and/or Vienna malts also provide an additional sense of richness and fullness. Moderate to high carbonation. Never hot or solventy.

Overall Impression: A strong, malty, fruity, wheat-based ale combining the best flavors of a dunkelweizen and the rich strength and body of a bock.

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Old 09-25-2008, 02:53 AM   #9
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Try a Wheatwine. I have one posted around here somewhere. Could use a Hefe yeast for the first week or 2 then switch to WLP007. Problem with an Imperial Hefe would be the yeast can't attenuate enough...

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Old 09-25-2008, 02:54 AM   #10
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Well holy Sh!t they are different styles after all Now if I could just find a recipe that someone has tried with a little success, this thread might just serve its purpose. Thanks all for the insight thus far.

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