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-   -   Daisy Cutter Pale Ale (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/daisy-cutter-pale-ale-134814/)

bjacokes 09-01-2009 06:16 PM

Daisy Cutter Pale Ale
 
Has anyone else in the Midwest tried Half Acre's Daily Cutter PA? Haven't seen any attempts to clone it, but I love this stuff and would be interesting in making something close. Thought maybe someone has attempted this already... I'm assuming it has the usual suspects, Amarillo/Cascade/Simcoe/etc, but to me this tastes pretty distinct from most other brews using those hops. Relevant info below.

"Daisy Cutter Pale Ale is a West Coast Strong Pale Ale, focusing on the aromatic qualities of the hops. A master blend of five different hops creates a powerful nose and a dynamic flavor."

5.20% ABV
I'm guessing around 40-50 IBU (not listed online)

Pappers_ 09-02-2009 12:12 AM

Hi, I've not had a chance to taste any of Half Acre's beers yet. Where is it being served? Thanks!

bjacokes 07-12-2010 11:51 PM

I got more info and gave this a shot a few months ago, although it was a fair bit off from the real thing. As a side note, I had a Daisy Cutter from the can a couple of weeks ago and it seems quite a bit hoppier than it did 12+ months ago when I first had it. In my opinion the less hoppy version was tastier, plus it was more of a hit with my non-hophead friends. Perhaps I'm making that difference up, but regardless I was shooting for what I remembered as the 12-month-ago version. Here are the numbers I was working with.

FG: Around 1.011 - 1.012 (measured)
OG: Around 1.050 - 1.052 (working backward from 5.2% ABV)
IBU: Not provided. If I had to take a wild guess I'd say 30 IBUs when I first had it and 37 IBUs now. I think I overestimated when I made my recipe.
SRM - I originally guesstimated 10 SRM, but I think it's actually closer to 7-8 SRM.
Hops: A guy at the brewery told me they use Ahtanum, Columbus, Simcoe, Amarillo, and Sterling. He hinted that they use tons of hops. Given the aroma I'd say it is mostly late+dry hopping.

Here is my recipe. I forgot to get crystal malt at the store and all I had left was a few ounces of C10L, C20L, C40L, and honey malt, so it was a bit haphazard. I also subbed Centennial for Ahtanum.

malt (1.052 OG)
75% american 2-row malt
12.5% assorted crystal malt
7.5% wheat malt
5% light munich malt

hops (40 IBU)
0.5oz each Amarillo+Simcoe FWH
0.5oz each Amarillo+Simcoe 10min
1oz each Amarillo+Sterling 1min
0.75 each Amarillo+Sterling dry hop
0.5oz Centennial dry hop
0.25oz each Simcoe+Columbus dry hop

Your choice of neutral american ale yeast

Compared to Daisy Cutter, this is a bit hoppier, too dark, too crystal-y, not quite aromatic enough, and not quite the right hop schedule. Nevertheless it's a great pale ale and people have found it plenty tasty.

After looking at the differences between mine and the real thing, I think Daisy Cutter is closer to something like Gumballhead than I had originally thought -- crisp and somewhat malty with a moderate but very aromatic hop presence. Here's some advice if you're looking to make a clone. Stay away from crystal malts; if you want them then stick with 10L and 20L in low amounts. Try some Vienna, possibly Munich, to get the color up to 8 SRM. This isn't a wheat beer but I wouldn't be surprised if there was a bit of wheat in there to make things crisp. Keep IBUs in the low 30s and do some magic with the hops that were listed. And let me know how it goes!

-b

BmillaTheBrewzilla 08-31-2010 02:49 AM

This has my interest... one of my next batches may be an attempt to clone this amazing beer.

m750 02-21-2011 07:56 PM

totally interested in this, and wonder if anyone has refined it.

I found another clone,
http://hopville.com/recipe/398786/american-pale-ale-recipes/daisy-cutter-clone
but don't have enough experience to compare the two. My research so far, has yielded two things. They use chicago public water, and 5 varieties of hops for Daisy cutter.
It's not available around here, but I'd like to make a batch for spring / summer.
Any further progress on this?
AO

amingo 02-21-2011 10:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by m750 (Post 2667446)
totally interested in this, and wonder if anyone has refined it.

I found another clone,
http://hopville.com/recipe/398786/american-pale-ale-recipes/daisy-cutter-clone
but don't have enough experience to compare the two. My research so far, has yielded two things. They use chicago public water, and 5 varieties of hops for Daisy cutter.
It's not available around here, but I'd like to make a batch for spring / summer.
Any further progress on this?
AO

Can't wait to try this. I'm curious about what gives Daisy Cutter its "grassy" aroma. I'm 4 kits into brewing and think it's about time to experiment a little more. I also live about a mile away from Half Acre and have the same access to Chicago water that they do.

I'll report back when I get around to it.

EricT 02-21-2011 10:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amingo (Post 2667851)
Can't wait to try this. I'm curious about what gives Daisy Cutter its "grassy" aroma. I'm 4 kits into brewing and think it's about time to experiment a little more. I also live about a mile away from Half Acre and have the same access to Chicago water that they do.

I'll report back when I get around to it.

The grassy aroma may come from whole hops instead of pellet?

amingo 02-21-2011 10:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EricT

The grassy aroma may come from whole hops instead of pellet?

Thanks EricT. Are you suggesting whole hops in dry-hopping only or throughout the brewing process?

Oldsock 02-22-2011 02:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EricT (Post 2667949)
The grassy aroma may come from whole hops instead of pellet?

If anything I've found that pellets are grassier than whole hops. Since pellets are broken up they have more chlorophyll exposed to the wort (which I suspect is the source of that grassiness). It also may just be a bigger hop bill, and fresh beer than other pale ales.

amingo 02-22-2011 05:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oldsock (Post 2669712)
If anything I've found that pellets are grassier than whole hops. Since pellets are broken up they have more chlorophyll exposed to the wort (which I suspect is the source of that grassiness). It also may just be a bigger hop bill, and fresh beer than other pale ales.

Do you know of any hop varieties that are "grassier" than others?


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