Home Brew Forums

Home Brew Forums (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Recipes/Ingredients (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/)
-   -   Creating a recipe (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/creating-recipe-401938/)

creekwaterbrew 04-01-2013 04:45 AM

Creating a recipe
 
Howdy!

New to the forum. Just wanting some advice on creating a unique recipe. I've got a few brews under my belt and I am tired of making brews that belong to others. Without asking for specifics, It would be really helpful to have a checklist of the basic ingredients that I can then select based on my preferences.
Ex. 1. Hops 2. Extract 3. Yeast etc... Thanks in advance!

amandabab 04-01-2013 05:09 AM

grains:
http://byo.com/resources/grains

hops:
http://byo.com/resources/hops

yeast:
http://byo.com/resources/yeast

Pastorken 04-01-2013 05:20 AM

1. Pick a style you like.
2. If you're doing extract, figure out what the base malt would be (light, pilsner, dark, wheat, etc.)
3. I like to see what flavor and color grains other recipes use in their recipes for that style. Read as many recipes in the style that you can and take notes.
If you have a LHBS, go through the grain bins and taste the malts that are recommended. You'd be surprised how much flavor and aroma come through in the raw grains.
4. Find the flavors you like and experiment with the amounts in your recipe.
5. Go through the same process with hops and find ones you like that fit the style. Then you can experiment with amounts and addition times.
6. Keep reading and talking to everyone here! There's some great info and brewers on this site.
7. RDWHAHB!

creekwaterbrew 04-01-2013 05:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amandabab

Wow great links. Thanks so much amandabab!

creekwaterbrew 04-01-2013 05:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pastorken
1. Pick a style you like.
2. If you're doing extract, figure out what the base malt would be (light, pilsner, dark, wheat, etc.)
3. I like to see what flavor and color grains other recipes use in their recipes for that style. Read as many recipes in the style that you can and take notes.
If you have a LHBS, go through the grain bins and taste the malts that are recommended. You'd be surprised how much flavor and aroma come through in the raw grains.
4. Find the flavors you like and experiment with the amounts in your recipe.
5. Go through the same process with hops and find ones you like that fit the style. Then you can experiment with amounts and addition times.
6. Keep reading and talking to everyone here! There's some great info and brewers on this site.
7. RDWHAHB!

Good advice. I'll be definitely browsing those grain bins next trip to the LHBS. Thanks!

suddsy83 04-01-2013 05:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amandabab

This is the best link to a guide on what to put with what. As a noob.. I am just getting the hang of placing flavors etc. thanks for the link amandabab.. Awesomeness!!! :mug:

mjohnson 04-01-2013 09:09 PM

My biggest advice is keep it simple. Especially for your first recipes. If you have more than 3 malts, consider if you really know what each is doing. Until you have a good idea of what individual malts do, adding more can you make your beer taste, "brown."

My simple recipes almost always come out better than the complicated ones.

duboman 04-01-2013 10:51 PM

I would add that you get a copy of "designing great beer" by Ray Daniels

The book is a little dated but gives typical percentages of grain used in all the many styles of beer and is a great starting point.

You can also reference the BJCP style guide which will also give you typical grains, hops, etc used in each style as well as good referenced commercial beers that represent that style

creekwaterbrew 04-02-2013 03:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mjohnson
My biggest advice is keep it simple. Especially for your first recipes. If you have more than 3 malts, consider if you really know what each is doing. Until you have a good idea of what individual malts do, adding more can you make your beer taste, "brown."

My simple recipes almost always come out better than the complicated ones.

Hmmmm well said. Makes sense, thanks!

creekwaterbrew 04-02-2013 03:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by duboman
I would add that you get a copy of "designing great beer" by Ray Daniels

The book is a little dated but gives typical percentages of grain used in all the many styles of beer and is a great starting point.

You can also reference the BJCP style guide which will also give you typical grains, hops, etc used in each style as well as good referenced commercial beers that represent that style

Man I need this book haha


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:32 PM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.