Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Cream Common / Classic American Cream Ale

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-27-2009, 06:27 AM   #1
KYB
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,566
Liked 39 Times on 24 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default Cream Common / Classic American Cream Ale

So lately I've been pretty interested in pre-prohibition beers. The big two around here back then were Dark (Cream) Common Beer and regular Cream Common Beer, the dark being what is now called Kentucky Common. I was wondering if anyone has any info on the CC/CACA. I have been searching for awhile tonight and have found some vague and conflicting data. So far it seems 70-75% 6-row and 25-30% corn. 25-30+ IBUs, fairly hoppy. I don't know what to think about the yeast. Some sites say use Lager yeast fermented at Ale temperatures, 68*F, others say Ale yeasts fermented at lager temperatures, or just Ale at Ale temp. I'm thinking about trying the Lager yeast at 68*F, which is what my cellar currently is. I read that temp control is important so esters aren't overpowering, but a lot of the results of fermenting lager yeast at ale temps is part of the style. I can't find anything as far as the gravity or abv goes. Any info or input would be appreciated. Thanks.

Also, I found this yesterday, thought it was kind of cool. "Cream Common" and "Dark Beer" ads, along with Pabst ad, in a 1906 newspaper "Kentucky Irish American". Cool site to search old newspapers. I just noticed there is an ad for my old high school in there too at the original location, that's pretty cool.

Kentucky Irish American. (Louisville, Ky.) 1898-1968 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress

__________________

Last edited by KYB; 08-27-2009 at 06:52 AM.
KYB is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-27-2009, 03:43 PM   #2
Bsquared
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Bsquared's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1,809
Liked 55 Times on 51 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

I brewed a Cream ale this summer and had about 20 people come buy to have some beer, I had a Belgian wit, and the cream ale on tap, and also fridge full with comerceral examples of each beer.

By far the cream ale was the hit of the night. Here is my recipe, I fermented at 64ºF.

Recipe: Summer Cream Ale
Style: 6A-Light Hybrid Beer-Cream Ale

Recipe Overview

Wort Volume Before Boil: 7.50 US gals
Wort Volume After Boil: 6.50 US gals
Volume Transferred: 6.00 US gals
Water Added: 0.00 US gals
Volume At Pitching: 6.00 US gals
Final Batch Volume: 5.50 US gals
Expected Pre-Boil Gravity: 1.043 SG
Expected OG: 1.050 SG
Expected FG: 1.011 SG
Expected ABV: 5.2 %
Expected ABW: 4.0 %
Expected IBU (using Tinseth): 17.0
Expected Color: 4.3 SRM
Apparent Attenuation: 77.4 %
Mash Efficiency: 75.0 %
Boil Duration: 75.0 mins
Fermentation Temperature: 64 degF

Fermentables
US 2-Row Malt 5lb 0oz (38.5 %) In Mash/Steeped
US 6-Row Malt 4lb 0oz (30.8 %) In Mash/Steeped
US Flaked Corn/Maize 2lb 0oz (15.4 %) In Mash/Steeped
US Rice Hulls 1lb 0oz (7.7 %) In Mash/Steeped
US White Wheat Malt 8.00 oz (3.8 %) In Mash/Steeped
Belgian Biscuit Malt 8.00 oz (3.8 %) In Mash/Steeped

Hops
US Willamette (4.5 % alpha) 0.41 oz Loose Pellet Hops used In Mash
UK Fuggle (4.5 % alpha) 0.50 oz Loose Pellet Hops used 60 Min From End
German Northern Brewer (8.0 % alpha) 0.47 oz Loose Pellet Hops used 15 Min From End

Other Ingredients
Irish Moss 0.50 oz used In Boil

Yeast: White Labs WLP080-Cream Ale Blend

Mash Schedule
Mash Type: Full Mash
Schedule Name:Single Step Infusion (66C/151F) w/Mash Out
Step: Rest at 151 degF for 60 mins
Step: Raise to and Mash out at 171 degF for 10 mins

Recipe Notes

__________________
Bsquared is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-27-2009, 03:57 PM   #3
Hilbert
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 189
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

I just asked a similar questions and Revvy added some good info in my post. Funny I had the exact same question regarding the yeast. No one can seem to agree. From what I have figured out if you use the lager yeast it's more of a Steam (California Common) if you use an ale yeast and ferment it low it's more of a traditional cream ale.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f37/flaked-maize-extract-brewing-cream-ale-133923/

__________________
Tap 1: Belgian Golden
Tap 2: Acid Weizenbock
Tap 3: Summer Ale
Tap 4: Heffe
Hilbert is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-27-2009, 04:01 PM   #4
Hilbert
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 189
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

[QUOTE=Bsquared;1510263]I brewed a Cream ale this summer and had about 20 people come buy to have some beer, I had a Belgian wit, and the cream ale on tap, and also fridge full with comerceral examples of each beer.


Yeast: White Labs WLP080-Cream Ale Blend

Where did you find that yeast? I didn't even know that existed and it doesn't look like you can even order it directly from White Labs.

__________________
Tap 1: Belgian Golden
Tap 2: Acid Weizenbock
Tap 3: Summer Ale
Tap 4: Heffe
Hilbert is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-27-2009, 05:08 PM   #5
Bsquared
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Bsquared's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1,809
Liked 55 Times on 51 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hilbert View Post
Where did you find that yeast? I didn't even know that existed and it doesn't look like you can even order it directly from White Labs.
They have it at Home brew mart here in San Diego, I looked on their web site but did not see it there. But I know they have it, I was just there an saw it there last Thursday. They have quite a few yeasts from WL that are not on their web site, but I'm not sure why. Give them a call, they might be able to ship you a vial.

I really liked it, I got good attenuation, and even with the wheat addition, it cleared up nicely. I could have cold conditioned it for a month longer, but I thirsty people to attend to.

The San Francisco lager yeast is also one of my favorites, I found that the Temperature really effects the flavor profile, Below 66 and you get more lager characteristics, above 66 it behaves much more like an ale yeast.
Good stuff if you want a lager-ish beer and don't want to be a 50ºF for a month.
__________________
Bsquared is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-27-2009, 05:24 PM   #6
KYB
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,566
Liked 39 Times on 24 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I still don't know. Still Googling. I've also found some places say the Cream Common has few hops, and others that say it's fairly hoppy. I'll keep looking. Gotta love the lack of info on these beers. Prohibition killed everything.

__________________
KYB is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-27-2009, 05:27 PM   #7
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2729 Times on 1637 Posts
Likes Given: 3485

Default

Some of my research, which I had posted in the thread that was previously mentioned.

Quote:
Kentucky Common Beer is a once-popular style of ale from the area in and around Louisville, Kentucky, that is rarely brewed commercially today. Cheaper than imported beers, it was popular among the working class

It was usually made with barley and approximately 25 to 30 percent maize, with some artificial coloring, caramel, or roasted malt to give it a dark color. It had an original gravity of 1.040-1.050, an average bitterness of 27 IBUs, and was brewed with 2 percent lactobacillum in the yeast.
__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-27-2009, 05:31 PM   #8
KYB
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,566
Liked 39 Times on 24 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

That is for Kentucky Common / Dark (Cream) Common Beer. Similar but completely different. I have all the info I could find for that in the link in my signature. My first recipe turned out fantastic, but I want to brew the regular pale Cream Common Beer.

Edit: I did just find that it had 1-1.5lbs of hops per barrel. So it was fairly hoppy.

Quote:
CREAM OR PRESENT USE ALE.

Material.—Seventy per cent of malt, 30 per cent of unmalted cereals; or 75 per cent of malt, and 25 per cent of sugar added in the kettle.

Alas/ting Method.—'iJcial temperature 122° F., hold 30 minutes, run in corn mash, 'hold at 154° F. for 30 minutes, run up to 162° F., mash until conversion is complete, rest one hour, tap, boil like lag(.r beer, adding from one to one and one-half pounds of hops per barrel. Add sugar (if used) 30 minutes before run- ing out. Balling of wort, 14 per cent. Cool, give from one-half to one pound of yeast per barrel. Use skimming system. After yeast-making is over, let settle for two days, fill into trade barrels, and add 10 per cent Krausen taken 36 hours after pitching.

For treatment of grits, flakes, etc., see "Mashing Operations" for Lager Beer.
http://books.google.com/books?ei=ks5SStSTE4PSMrOGxegI&ct=result&output=tex t&id=ppYKAAAAMAAJ&dq=kentucky+common+beer&q=cream# v=snippet&q=cream&f=false
__________________

Last edited by KYB; 08-27-2009 at 05:40 PM.
KYB is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-27-2009, 08:34 PM   #9
Hilbert
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 189
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bsquared View Post
The San Francisco lager yeast is also one of my favorites, I found that the Temperature really effects the flavor profile, Below 66 and you get more lager characteristics, above 66 it behaves much more like an ale yeast.
Good stuff if you want a lager-ish beer and don't want to be a 50ºF for a month.
That's funny because I was thinking about using san fran lager for my cream ale if I went the lager yeast direction
__________________
Tap 1: Belgian Golden
Tap 2: Acid Weizenbock
Tap 3: Summer Ale
Tap 4: Heffe
Hilbert is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-27-2009, 09:04 PM   #10
KYB
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,566
Liked 39 Times on 24 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I think I am going to try Wyeast California Lager. It says it's temperature range goes up to 68, although the lager characteristics goes up to 65. Hopefully my LHBS has it. They only carry Wyeast and Dry Yeast.

Wyeast Laboratories. California Lagerâ„¢ 2112

__________________

Last edited by KYB; 08-27-2009 at 09:27 PM.
KYB is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
All-Grain - Cream of Three Crops (Cream Ale) BierMuncher Light Hybrid Beer 2501 08-30-2014 12:34 AM
What makes a Cream Ale a Cream Ale? Kevin K General Beer Discussion 13 12-09-2010 04:24 AM
AHS Cream Ale or MW Liberty Cream Ale ssabin Extract Brewing 0 04-01-2009 02:34 AM
American Cream Ale addis29 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 07-09-2008 05:34 PM
Suggestions for American Cream/Blonde Ale Recipes? Stevorino Recipes/Ingredients 7 03-29-2008 04:51 PM