Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Corn Syrup Vs Rice
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-13-2009, 07:44 PM   #1
Shamrock28
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 147
Default Corn Syrup Vs Rice

Which costs more to by in bulk and what are the pros and cons of using one over the other? Also, what brand of corn syrup would one use? Where do buy?

__________________
Shamrock28 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-14-2009, 05:40 PM   #2
Tech211
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 140
Default

Just so you know, corn syrup is basically just glucose. You won't get any corn flavor.

As for what the pros and cons are, it would depend on what you are trying to achieve. What's your goal?

__________________
Tech211 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2009, 12:41 AM   #3
Shamrock28
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 147
Default

A cost effective adjunct

__________________
Shamrock28 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2009, 03:31 AM   #4
RogerMcAllen
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Decatur, IL
Posts: 619
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Corn syrup is a liquid, so it will be easier to use. It should also be a bit cheaper. Even the big guys don't use straight corn syrup. They use a dextrose/maltose blend.

If you want booze with no flavor just use dextrose (corn sugar).

__________________
RogerMcAllen is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2009, 03:38 AM   #5
BierMuncher
...My Junk is Ugly...
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BierMuncher's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 12,231
Liked 613 Times on 355 Posts
Likes Given: 231

Default

If you want a non-flavoring adjunct to boost the ABV and lighten up the flavor...plain table sugar up to 10% of the grain bill is the most cost effective and consistent.

I use it now in my C of 3 C's recipe and it works very well. Placed third in lite lagers last week at a competition.

BierMuncher is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2009, 02:45 PM   #6
Homercidal
Moderator
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Homercidal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Reed City, MI
Posts: 24,438
Liked 2450 Times on 1726 Posts
Likes Given: 1404

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BierMuncher View Post
If you want a non-flavoring adjunct to boost the ABV and lighten up the flavor...plain table sugar up to 10% of the grain bill is the most cost effective and consistent.

I use it now in my C of 3 C's recipe and it works very well. Placed third in lite lagers last week at a competition.
+1 All of my reading and listening indicates that table sugar, or corn sugar is fine and is often used by the pro homebrewers at up to 15-20%, depending on the beer style.
__________________
I see lonely ships upon the water. Better save the women and children first. Sail away with someone's daughter. Better save the women and children first.

Homer's Brew Log
Homercidal is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2009, 03:47 PM   #7
Cpt_Kirks
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lakeland TN
Posts: 3,740
Liked 45 Times on 39 Posts

Default

Table sugar? Nope, I'm a purist.

I use Corn Sugar.

__________________
Cpt_Kirks is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2009, 03:59 PM   #8
Shamrock28
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 147
Default

I always was under the impression table sugar was a simple sugar and corn syrup was a blend of dextrose/maltose blend. The later part better and to never use table sugar. This is very interesting now people are saying they have used table sugar in their recipes.. Does anyone know a good brand if i wanted to use corn syrup along with two row barely as part of my recipe

__________________
Shamrock28 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2009, 04:01 PM   #9
flyangler18
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Hanover, PA
Posts: 5,679
Liked 30 Times on 29 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Table sugar has its place in many beer recipes, especially Belgians. It lightens the body to make the beer, in the words of the monks, 'more digestible'. There is also a tradition of using simple sugars in English brewing.

__________________
flyangler18 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2009, 07:02 PM   #10
Killer_Robot
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 215
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyangler18 View Post
Table sugar has its place in many beer recipes, especially Belgians. It lightens the body to make the beer, in the words of the monks, 'more digestible'. There is also a tradition of using simple sugars in English brewing.
In strictest terms, simple sugars are monosaccharides, which have one sugar unit, but in terms of the basic sugars used as brewing adjuncts I'll also include disaccharides, which are two simple sugars linked together and often ferment nearly as quickly and cleanly. The common ones are below:

Corn Sugar = Dextrose = Glucose = monosaccharide
Maltose = Glucose+Glucose = linked disaccharide
Table sugar = Sucrose = Glucose+Fructose = linked disaccharide
Lactose = Glucose+Galactose = linked disaccharide, non-fermentable by yeast
Invert sugar = Glucose and Fructose = mixed monosaccharides made by breaking up table sugar with an acid and heat

Some other equivalents:

Brewing grade corn syrup = mostly glucose (kitchen grade might have flavorings and additives you don't want to brew with)
High-fructose corn syrup = invert sugar (corn syrup processed by enzymes to turn half of the glucose into fructose)
Brewing grade rice syrup = mostly glucose and maltose
Candi sugar = invert sugar, partially caramelized for flavor
Honey = invert sugar, though obviously with its own natural flavors
Brown/raw sugar = sucrose, with the natural cane flavoring (brown is white sugar + molasses, raw is cane sugar before the molasses is extracted)
Maple syrup = mostly sucrose

All of these but lactose can be fermented quickly and completely by yeast. Highly purified varieties will lend no real flavor to the end product if used properly, interchangably boosting ABV without affecting body. Less refined sugars will lend their flavors to the end result, so will be more detectable. Corn vs. rice should matter less when you use syrups or sugars than it would if you were mashing the grains with your malt, I would think - you're buying a more refined product and a lot of the unique flavors were removed along the way.
__________________
Killer_Robot is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sorghum Syrup v Brown Rice Syrup Lcasanova Gluten Free Brewing 19 04-29-2014 06:08 PM
Corn Sugar -vs- Rice Syrup Solids Cpt_Kirks Recipes/Ingredients 2 03-13-2009 04:51 PM
Corn Syrup instead of Rice Syrup? Pinck Extract Brewing 4 11-06-2008 01:11 AM
corn sugar vs. corn/rice flakes Cos All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 06-18-2008 04:48 PM
corn sugar or corn syrup? nihiles Extract Brewing 10 03-16-2008 01:32 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS