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Old 08-11-2011, 11:56 PM   #1
smithjw24
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Default Corn ale anyone?

Has anyone made a all grain corn ALE beer? I have a feeling if I brew a pale ale style and add corn into the mix it may taste alright but wont really have the effects Im looking for. I guess my question is what is the proper way to use corn in an all grain brew that isn't a coors water flavor beer? my gut instinct wants to formulate a recipe using corn as the base malt with some caramel malt I.D.K. crystal 40 to 60 with maybe carapils and or victory malt and oats but keep the O.S. gravity low like 1035-40 and hopp the s#*T out of it. Any thoughts????

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Old 08-12-2011, 12:02 AM   #2
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better get sum diastic powder, amylas or sumtin to convert the starches.. no base grain = no conversion!!

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Old 08-12-2011, 12:50 AM   #3
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Are you talking about a cream ale? It's pretty common. There's a ton of recipes on here. It's nothing special, just a really refreshing beer.

Here's some info on the style of beer.

The easiest way is to use flaked maize. The corn goes through a process where it is pregelatinized, and you just add it to the mash tun along with your grain.

The other way is to do what's called a cereal mash. You boil the corn with some diastic grain like 2 row until it becomes like porrige and the starch has converted, then you add it to the mash tun with your grain. If you're doing a cereal mash you can use almost any form of corn, folks use grits, masa, cornmeal, canned cream corn, corn on the cob, hominy, and even popped popcorn.

Here's a cream ale recipe made with popcorn

Popcorn Cream ALe

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Old 08-12-2011, 03:06 AM   #4
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Around here the mountain folk malt their own corn so that they can mash it with 100% corn. They're not making beer though...

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Old 08-12-2011, 01:30 PM   #5
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OK, I read that as corn HOLE beer. Eeeeewwww.

Need coffee now.

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Old 08-12-2011, 07:11 PM   #6
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Wow lots of good ideas, thanks for the replies. A friend of mine brought back a growlier from a brewery in Russian River area that was a corn based ale that was really hoppy and refreshing. We can't remember the name of the brewery, but would very much like to mimic that beer. Thanks for the help, I'll keep researching.

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Old 08-12-2011, 07:32 PM   #7
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Another thought is i just looked into a miller light lager clone type and this guy is saying that with this amalayse enzym you gett a really low gravity and less of a corn taste because the enzyme eats at other sugars that the yeast dont finish with.check out the search under the recipes discussion forum.
I recently bought some and have way more than enough of flaked corn, so recently im trying to get ideas as ive used all my lager yeast also. thinking about trying it with some 6 row and nottingham.
Protein rest???

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Old 08-12-2011, 07:45 PM   #8
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Funny you ask, a small brewery I frequent came out with "Thomas Jefferson Ale" which featured corn as much of the fermentables.

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Old 08-12-2011, 07:45 PM   #9
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Ah, found it! It was called Monticello Reserve Ale (TJ home). Here is some info from the brewery:

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Monticello Reserve Ale
February 01, 2011

Introducing Monticello’s new microbrew, just in time for Presidents’ Day!

Monticello Reserve Ale will be sold in 750ml bottles at Monticello and Starr Hill’s Tasting Room ONLY. It will be brewed and bottled locally by Starr Hill Brewery, in Crozet, Virginia, by Master Brewer Mark Thompson.

A revolution is brewing in the artisanal beer world, inspired by the taste of Thomas Jefferson and what was brewed historically at Monticello. The Thomas Jefferson Foundation, in collaboration with Starr Hill Brewery, announces the launch of Monticello Reserve Ale, the official beer of Monticello.
The public is invited to a free tasting to celebrate the launch of Monticello Reserve Ale, Presidents’ Day, Monday, February 21, 12 p.m.- 3 p.m.– in the Thomas Jefferson Visitor Center Museum Shop at Monticello. The launch will include the tapping of the first keg. Free tastings will be provided.

Monticello Reserve Ale is inspired by what was produced and consumed regularly at Monticello. It is made from a combination of wheat and corn, lightly hopped.
Brewing beer was an important plantation activity at Monticello. Beer, one of the “table liquors” served with meals, was a staple of the Jefferson household. Records go back to 1772, when Jefferson’s wife Martha oversaw the periodic brewing operations, producing 15 gallon casks of small beer – beer with low alcohol content – about every two weeks.

In 1815, Jefferson writes in a letter to Joseph Coppinger (himself a brewer):
“I am lately become a brewer for family use, having had the benefit of instruction to one of my people by an English brewer of the first order.”

Large-scale brewing began with the appearance of a British brewer detained in Albemarle County during the War of 1812. Captain Joseph Miller improved upon the quality and quantity of Monticello beer, introducing ale, stronger beer suited to storage. While at Monticello, Joseph Miller trained the enslaved Peter Hemings in the arts of malting and brewing. Hemings – a brother of Sally – carried on the brewing operations, making 100 gallons of ale every spring and fall.

Jefferson wrote in 1821 that he had “no receipt for brewing,” doubting “if the operations of malting and brewing could be successfully performed from a receipt.” Using ingredients grown on the Monticello plantation, Jefferson’s brews varied based on the grains that were available at any given time, including barley, and larger quantities of corn and wheat. At Monticello, about three-quarters of a pound of hops were used for every bushel of malt.
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Old 08-12-2011, 08:36 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Germelli1 View Post
Ah, found it! It was called Monticello Reserve Ale (TJ home). Here is some info from the brewery:
I was at Starr Hill last week and sampled that one(my brother was visiting and we went brewery hopping). I love a lot of their brews, but I have to say that one in particular was pretty bad. I don't mind a little corn sweetness in a beer, but the flavor is somewhat overbearing in that one.
Incidentally, I have been planning on brewing an american farmhouse ale for some time with corn grits as about 15% of the fermentables. I started having second thoughts after trying the monticello reserve, but I already have the ingredients and figured what the hell. I'll at least experiment. I figure the grits may not impart such a flavor. Other ingredients are 6 row, toasted wheat berries, and toasted oats. I posted on it in this forum earlier. Brew day for it is tomorrow.

Germelli, are you from the area?
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