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Old 04-29-2010, 02:02 PM   #1
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Default Centennial Flavor

Hey everybody, I have a question about the flavor of centennial hops. And before you flame me for not searching the forums, I did. I read the post with the vote for personal preference between cascade and centennial and other posts as well. So, here's my question, for those of you who have used centennial as a bittering hop, in your opinion, is the flavor of centennial citrusy at all? The reason that I'm asking is that I was given some centennial hop roots last March (was given some cascade and EKG also) and they all seem extremely happy. The centennial bines are already almost 3 feet tall and I expect to get a pretty good crop this year. I collected about 3 1/2 oz or so last year. The second batch I ever made was an extract kit that came with summit hops and I really didn't like that fruity, (IMO) citrusy flavor at all. So I really want to make something with centennial but not if it tastes citrusy, it just doesn't work for me. Thanks everyone.

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Old 04-29-2010, 02:11 PM   #2
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Centennial IS citrusy, but if you use it for bittering, you won't get too much of that citrusy character at all. It's got a bit of an edge for bittering, which isn't necessarily bad- just plan accordingly.

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Old 04-29-2010, 02:15 PM   #3
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I have only used about 3/4 of a pound (same bag) and I do get some citrus but it has a lot of spice to it and is very floral imo. I stopped using it for bittering but I really like it for very late additions and dry-hopping.

I just tapped a Pale Ale with a 50:50 mix of Simcoe:Centennial and I have now renamed that brew "Indian River Pale Ale". Grapefruit city but I think a lot of that is the Simcoe (which is very piney/citrusy to me).

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Old 04-29-2010, 02:19 PM   #4
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Have you tried Bell's Two Hearted IPA or Founder's Centennial? They are both made entirely with Centennial hops. If you don't like that flavor then you can use them for bittering as suggested above.

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Old 04-29-2010, 02:26 PM   #5
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I just made an IPA with Centennial for bittering, flavor, and dry hop. I agree that it will impart a citrus note, but what's more noticeable (as opposed to say just Cascade) is the spicy floral notes. The first impression I get from the beer is "floral" then "spice", and then some citrus fruit. Then again, the malt substrate is pretty aggressive, so it may subdue the citrus flavors and aromas to a degree.

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Old 04-29-2010, 04:03 PM   #6
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I've read that a good substitute for centennial is half cascade and half columbus. Does this sound right?

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Old 04-29-2010, 04:07 PM   #7
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I agree on the floral notes. To me it is floral first, citrus/spice second. But both are pretty prominent.

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I've read that a good substitute for centennial is half cascade and half columbus. Does this sound right?
Yes I think this would work alright.
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Old 04-29-2010, 04:09 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpsloan View Post
I just made an IPA with Centennial for bittering, flavor, and dry hop. I agree that it will impart a citrus note, but what's more noticeable (as opposed to say just Cascade) is the spicy floral notes. The first impression I get from the beer is "floral" then "spice", and then some citrus fruit. Then again, the malt substrate is pretty aggressive, so it may subdue the citrus flavors and aromas to a degree.
So by 'spicy floral notes' are you referring more to the aroma or to the taste?
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Old 04-29-2010, 06:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpsloan View Post
I just made an IPA with Centennial for bittering, flavor, and dry hop. I agree that it will impart a citrus note, but what's more noticeable (as opposed to say just Cascade) is the spicy floral notes. The first impression I get from the beer is "floral" then "spice", and then some citrus fruit
I agree--everyone I know who tries Bell's Two-Hearted describes it somehow to the effect of "that's really floral!".
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Old 04-29-2010, 06:27 PM   #10
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Floral in the nose, spice and citrus (and bitterness) on the palate. At least, that's my current experience. More citrus comes through something like BM's Centennial Blonde.

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