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Old 12-21-2010, 02:57 PM   #1
clawton
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Default Cause for unbalanced porter

I brewed a porter a few months ago and it has what I call a strong roasty flavor. I think it is somewhat too strong of one flavor although I have given it to many friends who like it. I assume it is the Roasted barley in the recipe below causing the strong flavor. Any comments on what i should tune back on my next batch? Would the Choc or Black Patent grains contribute to the strong roasted flavor I taste?

3.3 lbs dark lme
4.5 lbs light dme
0.5 lb Black Patent
0.25 lb Chocolate
0.25 lb Roasted
1.5 oz Norther Brewer (9.4%), boiling
1 oz Tettnanger, dry hop

Thanks.

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Old 12-21-2010, 03:02 PM   #2
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1/2 pound black patent probably put it over the top, especially with 3.3 pounds dark lme, which is made with c60 and....black patent.

1/4lb roasted barley will also definitely add a lot of roast - in a porter, probably 2oz is max.

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Old 12-21-2010, 03:04 PM   #3
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Yep. Black patent is like the espresso of the roast malt world. I use a 1/4 pound in a ten gallon batch.

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Old 12-21-2010, 03:48 PM   #4
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Yep. Black patent is like the espresso of the roast malt world. I use a 1/4 pound in a ten gallon batch.
Except that it isn't a crystal malt... (never mind, my brain isn't firing on all cylinders...)

I've found that adjusting my water to have enough carbonate (by adding baking soda or chalk) really helps to reduce the harsh/acrid notes that black patent can give. I've gone as high as 1 lb in 5 gallons without issue with the right water.
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Old 12-21-2010, 04:39 PM   #5
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Yep. Black patent is like the espresso of the roast malt world.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock View Post
Except that it isn't a crystal malt...
uh, what??
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Old 12-21-2010, 05:34 PM   #6
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uh, what??
Clearly I'm crazy... no idea what I was reading.
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Old 12-21-2010, 05:50 PM   #7
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lol. but, that aside, aren't roasted malts made the same way as crystal, just...roasted longer?

also, I brew with pretty mineral-void water, and my dark beers always had a harsh taste. this last porter i made i spiked with a heavy dose of calcium, and it's been much better.

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Old 12-21-2010, 05:50 PM   #8
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1.5 oz Norther Brewer (9.4%), boiling

If this was added for a 60 min boil, it might be adding more bitterness than a usual porter. This could be combining with the roast malt to make it seem unbalanced.

The porter I just brewed (1.053 OG) has only 1 oz of 6.8% Saaz for bittering.

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Old 12-21-2010, 05:54 PM   #9
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lol. but, that aside, aren't roasted malts made the same way as crystal, just...roasted longer?
Crystal malts are soaked and “stewed” in a moist environment so that their starches convert to sugars (which can then caramelize), roasted malts are just roasted dry/hot (as far as I'm aware). Roasting a crystal malt longer would give you a dark crystal malt (Special B, Extra Dark, CaraAroma etc...). Roasted malts are the dark end of the biscuit, amber, brown , pale chocolate continuum.
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Old 12-21-2010, 07:19 PM   #10
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To make a generalization, most people stop using anything but light DME/LME once they start crafting their own recipes. By itself, your grains would not produce a beer that's too roasty, but as mentioned above, the fact that you combined it with dark LME means you added a huge amount of roasted grains.

Get more control over your recipes by switching to light extract and then devising your specialty grains.

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