Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > All-Grain - Budget Summer India Pale Ale
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-20-2011, 06:16 AM   #21
dirty_martini
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 319
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mongrel View Post
10 Barrel in Bend, OR is doing a lower ABV IPA, and calling it an ISA (India-Style Session Ale).
Drakes from NorCal made a beer called Alpha Sessions last year. 3.8%abv and 80ish Ibus. It was amazing. I called it a California lite beer.

That said, IPAs can be made for cheap if you use your ingredients wisely.

1.Use mostly base malt. It tends to be cheaper than specialty malts. Use just enough specialty malts to get the job done. No more.

2. Have a good high alpha bittering hop. I like summits for example. At 16-18%AA, you dont have to use much to get you the bitterness you need.

3. Account for 4oz of hops to divide between late boil and dry hop. That should only cost around $8.

4. Use dry yeast. US-05, s-04, or nottingham are all good for IPAs and half the price of liquid yeast. You also dont need any extract to make a starter with. Pitch and go.

5. Go a little lower in ABV and IBU. There are plenty of great IPAs on the lower end around 6% and 60-65IBUs.

Ill use Austin Homebrew as a baseline for pricing a simple recipe.

13lb 2-row @ $1.35/lb = $17.55
1oz Carafa III Debittered (just to give a little color, but not necessary) = $.85

1oz Summit 60min 18%AA = $1.99
2oz if any hops you want @ flameout = $3.98
2oz for dryhopping = $3.98

1pack US-05 = $3.49

OG - 1.064
FG - 1.012
ABV - 6.9%
IBU - 63

total cost - $31.84
$6.37/gal of beer
__________________
dirty_martini is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2011, 07:31 AM   #22
Brew_4iT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Manchester, NH
Posts: 453
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Alright, well went to a different brew shop than I usually go to because I was in the area (luckily will move closer to this area so will be my main place). I picked up all the ingredients... and an extra oz of centennial (for all the haters out there), a muslim bag, extra pound of dextrose for a grand total of... $20

1 oz Magnum 60min
.5 oz centennial 40min
.5 oz centennial 15min
1 oz cascade dryhopped leaf

OG - 1.065
FG - 1.017 (depending on yeast retained)
ABV - 6.5%*
IBU - 60.1

Total cost - $20 (- priming sugar and muslim bag less)

5 gallons of beer


***Just to note, I'm not going to banter about previous dialogue pertaining to what constitutes a "hoppy" beer (seems to me that even late additions of nonetheless "hops" would make a beer thicker and hoppy...) Although remaining within guidelines of referenced brewing material and being told... it is what it is not, no further sourced citations of any credibility besides attacking one area of my recipe while further being told that I'm rude for defending BJCP style guidelines and definitions of the like ... I'll just swallow it

__________________

"Good people drink good beer" -- Hunter S. Thompson

“The original American patriots were those individuals brave enough to resist with force the oppressive power of King George...Patriotism is more closely linked to dissent than it is to conformity and a blind desire for safety and security.”
― Ron Paul

Brew_4iT is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2011, 08:36 AM   #23
Brew_4iT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Manchester, NH
Posts: 453
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

don't really want to cross hairs... but "added late during a boil" wouldn't be qualitative. In statistics qualitative means data that cannot be categorized mathematically only by categories of opinionized value. Because the value of bittering can be mathematically figured by the AA and time... yada yada

I don't know I guess from my perspective without numerical value, a beer would mainly be only biased opinionized banter.

__________________

"Good people drink good beer" -- Hunter S. Thompson

“The original American patriots were those individuals brave enough to resist with force the oppressive power of King George...Patriotism is more closely linked to dissent than it is to conformity and a blind desire for safety and security.”
― Ron Paul

Brew_4iT is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2011, 12:42 PM   #24
slowbie
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 640
Liked 13 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brew_4iT View Post
...Because the value of bittering can be mathematically figured by the AA and time...
Which would be a good point, except I'm not referring to the value of bittering, but rather the flavor and aroma contributions, which cannot be mathematically expressed.
__________________
slowbie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2011, 04:30 PM   #25
Reno_eNVy
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Reno_eNVy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Reno, Nevada
Posts: 6,224
Liked 195 Times on 164 Posts
Likes Given: 66

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brew_4iT View Post
(seems to me that even late additions of nonetheless "hops" would make a beer thicker and hoppy...)
In response to the bolded word: "....um... what?"

Are you under the impression that late-boil and dryhops add body to beer?
__________________
Primary: air and sadness =(

Kegged: Cascadian Dark Ale

Bottled: English Barleywine (brewed 9/26/09 -- bottled 5/5/10)


LET'S GO LA!
LA CAMPEONES!
PLAY FOR GLORY, THE GLORY LA!
Reno_eNVy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2011, 06:25 PM   #26
Doog_Si_Reeb
Beer is Good. And stuff!
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Doog_Si_Reeb's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 870
Liked 23 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

Excellent choice on using 1084! I have brewed several IPAs and a Black IPA (that won a BoS) using the 1084 strain. Fermented in the mid-60s, it works magic with the malt and strong American hop flavors.

__________________
Uff Da Picobrewery

Primary: BohPils3
Kegged: Vienna Lager, Mánagarmr Stout, Ratatoskr IIPA, Cider
Bottled: Yule Gruit
Doog_Si_Reeb is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2011, 06:33 PM   #27
Brew_4iT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Manchester, NH
Posts: 453
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbie View Post
Which would be a good point, except I'm not referring to the value of bittering, but rather the flavor and aroma contributions, which cannot be mathematically expressed.
Are you serious dude? Even flavor and aroma can be quantifiable. Think about it... If you can calculate time by the amount of bittering for early additions, and the amount of aroma and flavor loss you have more than enough values for an expression to numerically value aroma/taste this hasn't been done yet???

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reno_eNVy_446 View Post
In response to the bolded word: "....um... what?"

Are you under the impression that late-boil and dryhops add body to beer?
Remove the idea of bittering being the soul definition for "hoppy"

Derivative: hoppy
adj

Smelling or tasting of hops.


Unless late additions contribute no value (which you are all telling me has great value lol) then their has to be something present... right? Think about it. You may not be able to see the thickness, or what have you but, even late additions of hops leaves more elements into the finished beer. Hence... the beer must be thicker with something, or their would be nothing
__________________

"Good people drink good beer" -- Hunter S. Thompson

“The original American patriots were those individuals brave enough to resist with force the oppressive power of King George...Patriotism is more closely linked to dissent than it is to conformity and a blind desire for safety and security.”
― Ron Paul

Brew_4iT is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2011, 06:44 PM   #28
Reno_eNVy
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Reno_eNVy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Reno, Nevada
Posts: 6,224
Liked 195 Times on 164 Posts
Likes Given: 66

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brew_4iT View Post
Remove the idea of bittering being the soul definition for "hoppy"

Derivative: hoppy
adj

Smelling or tasting of hops.


Unless late additions contribute no value (which you are all telling me has great value lol) then their has to be something present... right? Think about it. You may not be able to see the thickness, or what have you but, even late additions of hops leaves more elements into the finished beer.
Late additions contribute flavor and aroma compounds which add to hop flavor and aroma. Body is produced by unfermentables from grain, as well as other unfermentables you may want to add (i.e. lactose.)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brew_4iT View Post
Hence... the beer must be thicker with something, or their would be nothing
So by the same logic, adding spices adds body or thickness because you're putting something in there.

I think you're confusing flavor with body.

99.9999999% of the things we "taste" are actually smells. The only things we actually taste are sweet, sour, bitter, salty, umami and acid. Everything else "tastes" how the smell-compounds are interpreted by our olfactory system. This means these smelly compounds are volatile and must be of negligible mass compared to 5 gallons or even a pint, thus, no body is added. QED
__________________
Primary: air and sadness =(

Kegged: Cascadian Dark Ale

Bottled: English Barleywine (brewed 9/26/09 -- bottled 5/5/10)


LET'S GO LA!
LA CAMPEONES!
PLAY FOR GLORY, THE GLORY LA!
Reno_eNVy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2011, 06:51 PM   #29
dcp27
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Medford, MA
Posts: 4,076
Liked 118 Times on 114 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brew_4iT View Post
Are you serious dude? Even flavor and aroma can be quantifiable. Think about it... If you can calculate time by the amount of bittering for early additions, and the amount of aroma and flavor loss you have more than enough values for an expression to numerically value aroma/taste this hasn't been done yet???
yes, its generally quantified by the amount of late hops, hence why everyone is saying you didnt have enough. I guess you could try to quantify it further by including the %essential oils, but since their make-up hugely varies hop to hop and have different rates of volatility and absorption, the estimate would be even further from the inaccuracy of IBU calculations
__________________
dcp27 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2011, 07:04 PM   #30
Brew_4iT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Manchester, NH
Posts: 453
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

I'm not arguing these points I whole heartedly agree. Nothing is absolute, but numbers helps with precision. I like the fact that in brewing you can never replicate an exact beer twice, especially when aging is involved...

And no I'm not talking about the initial body of a beer, I was loosley expressing earlier in the thread when I first grab a sip of an IPA the first initial response is a thickly hopped beer. whether right or wrong I just do...

I'm not claiming that I know all the answers, I still have a lot to learn I admit that.

__________________

"Good people drink good beer" -- Hunter S. Thompson

“The original American patriots were those individuals brave enough to resist with force the oppressive power of King George...Patriotism is more closely linked to dissent than it is to conformity and a blind desire for safety and security.”
― Ron Paul

Brew_4iT is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
All-Grain - Honey Bee Imperial India Pale Ale permo India Pale Ale 5 12-31-2010 04:29 PM
All-Grain - Double S India Pale Ale Rhoobarb India Pale Ale 2 05-20-2009 07:31 PM
Heathen Imperial India Pale Ale PseudoChef India Pale Ale 1 05-29-2008 03:15 PM
India Rye Pale Ale MikeFlynn74 India Pale Ale 1 04-13-2008 05:12 PM
Invading India Pale Ale Arneba28 India Pale Ale 2 03-06-2008 07:22 AM