The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > British Mild/Ordinary Bitter w/ Pacific Northwest. (NW) Ingredients

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-13-2009, 07:22 PM   #1
Picobrew
Biscuit Enthusiast
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Picobrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NW Portland, OR
Posts: 1,107
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default British Mild/Ordinary Bitter w/ Pacific Northwest. (NW) Ingredients

I would really like to make a British Mild or Ordinary Bitter that uses NW ingredients. I could use some help, because I am not really as familiar with the ingredients as I would like to be.

I was hoping that I could use NW Pale Malt instead of Marris Otter. Does NW Pale Malt have some of the MO characteristics, or is somewhere more in between regular Pale and MO?

Is there a NW hop like East Kent Goldings that I could use?

I was planning on using British Ale Yeast, but I was hoping that there is a US yeast that will give me similar flavors. I think US-05 and California Ale yeasts finish too dry, is this right?

Thanks!
Pico

__________________
Picobrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-13-2009, 07:26 PM   #2
DeathBrewer
Maniacally Malty
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
DeathBrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 21,825
Liked 201 Times on 112 Posts

Default

What is NW? Northwest? Is that a malting company?

If you are using domestic 2-row, I would mix in a little domestic munich to help with that graininess and maltiness you get from the mariss otter.

Domestic goldings are very good, a little more floral than east kent. Domestic fuggle or willamette would work well, too.

I think the california ale yeast will work just fine.

So, yeah...use a large portion of munich, mash at around 154°F, and be ready for some yumminess.

__________________
Easy Partial Mash Brewing - Stovetop All-Grain Brewing

"Death is always with us." - Brewpastor

Quote:
DIAICYLF
We will remember...
DeathBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-13-2009, 07:30 PM   #3
Picobrew
Biscuit Enthusiast
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Picobrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NW Portland, OR
Posts: 1,107
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathBrewer View Post
What is NW? Northwest? Is that a malting company?

If you are using domestic 2-row, I would mix in a little domestic munich to help with that graininess and maltiness you get from the mariss otter.

Domestic goldings are very good, a little more floral than east kent. Domestic fuggle or willamette would work well, too.

I think the california ale yeast will work just fine.

So, yeah...use a large portion of munich, mash at around 154°F, and be ready for some yumminess.
Sorry, to clarify, when I say I want to use "NW Ingredients", I mean ingredients that are local to the Pacific Northwest. "NW Pale Malt" is a product that Great Western Malting offers. Here is the comparison to 2-row:

Premium Two Row: Our traditional premium quality two-row malt. We utilize several Western varieties to maintain stringent quality standards. Color is 1.8° to 2.2°.

Northwest Pale Ale: Great Western’s higher-color two-row malt. This product is a well-modified Western grown two-row with colors ranging from 2.6° to 3.0° (ASBC).
__________________
Picobrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-13-2009, 08:17 PM   #4
Bob
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Christiansted, St Croix, USVI, US Virgin Islands
Posts: 3,916
Liked 123 Times on 92 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

I think you're on the money with the Pale Malt sub. Maybe toast 8-16 ounces for a bit in your oven to get some of the crackery, bready goodness for which Maris Otter is famous.

+1 on US Goldings or US Fuggles.

If you ferment S-05 or other American Ale yeasts on the warm side of their recommended temperature range, you'll get more of the fruit esters for which English ales are famous. Wyeast 1272, Wyeast 1332, WLP041 and WLP051 also have fruitier ester profiles than the standard "US" strains (S-05, Wyeast 1056, WLP001) or Nottingham. I used to use Cal V (WLP051) for damn near everything and just adjust the temperature to encourage (or discourage) ester production.

Bob

__________________

Brewmaster
Fort Christian Brewpub
St Croix, US Virgin Islands

Bob is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-13-2009, 08:18 PM   #5
Freezeblade
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 1,415
Liked 21 Times on 13 Posts

Default

I think that the one described as 2.6-3.0 would work well, maybe toss in a slight amount (2%?) of biscuit for a bit more breadyness. DB is right (as per usual) about the hops, although I would probably still use an english ale yeast, I just don't think that american ale yeasts are quite estery enough to duplicate that english ale yeast character. if you must use american yeasts though, I'd say go for ones that have just a bit more character than the WLP001, like the WLP008 (East Coast Ale), WY1332 (NorthWest Ale), WY1272 (American Ale II).

__________________
Primary:Russian River Redemption clone, Kelly's Melomel, Graham's English Cider 22-23
Clearing:Apple Wine
Aging:Public House Dry Stout, Procrastination Porter, Mr. Brown Ale, Westvleteren 12 Clone, Mead, Duvel Clone, Graham's English Cider 6-21, Belgian Draak Strong Ale, Fig Melomel, Acerglyn, Restorative Tonic Metheglyn
Freezeblade is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-13-2009, 08:20 PM   #6
Picobrew
Biscuit Enthusiast
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Picobrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NW Portland, OR
Posts: 1,107
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NQ3X View Post
I think you're on the money with the Pale Malt sub. Maybe toast 8-16 ounces for a bit in your oven to get some of the crackery, bready goodness for which Maris Otter is famous.

+1 on US Goldings or US Fuggles.

If you ferment S-05 or other American Ale yeasts on the warm side of their recommended temperature range, you'll get more of the fruit esters for which English ales are famous. Wyeast 1272, Wyeast 1332, WLP041 and WLP051 also have fruitier ester profiles than the standard "US" strains (S-05, Wyeast 1056, WLP001) or Nottingham. I used to use Cal V (WLP051) for damn near everything and just adjust the temperature to encourage (or discourage) ester production.

Bob
Thanks for the tips! I can't control my temps yet, and tend to ferment at 76, so I guess I will get some of those fruity qualities.

Has anyone used NW Pale Ale Malt on here? I did some googling/searching and couldn't find any reference. It is only $33 for a 50lb bag from brewbrothers.biz
__________________
Picobrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-13-2009, 08:34 PM   #7
Laughing_Gnome_Invisible
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Laughing_Gnome_Invisible's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Norwalk, Ohio
Posts: 12,059
Liked 508 Times on 391 Posts
Likes Given: 75

Default

Kudos to you for trying to achieve this with local products. It's certainly not the easy way to do it, but I appreciate that effort when somebody stretches themselves with a goal in mind other than just making great beer. Good luck with it!!

__________________

Steven Hawking ~ As we say in science, the England football team couldn’t hit a cow’s arse with a banjo

Laughing_Gnome_Invisible is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-13-2009, 10:12 PM   #8
DeathBrewer
Maniacally Malty
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
DeathBrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 21,825
Liked 201 Times on 112 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Picobrew View Post
Thanks for the tips! I can't control my temps yet, and tend to ferment at 76, so I guess I will get some of those fruity qualities.

Has anyone used NW Pale Ale Malt on here? I did some googling/searching and couldn't find any reference. It is only $33 for a 50lb bag from brewbrothers.biz
I've used the Pale Ale malt. It's a tad more malty than regular 2-row...works good for light SMaSH ales.

I would HIGHLY suggest finding a way to control your fermentation temperatures. There are only a few types of beer that should ever ferment about 70°F. It's so easy, too, whether it's a son-of-fermentation chiller, a used fridge or simply an ice bath, there's really no reason you can't get something to make your beer HUNDREDS of times better.
__________________
Easy Partial Mash Brewing - Stovetop All-Grain Brewing

"Death is always with us." - Brewpastor

Quote:
DIAICYLF
We will remember...
DeathBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-13-2009, 10:24 PM   #9
Picobrew
Biscuit Enthusiast
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Picobrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NW Portland, OR
Posts: 1,107
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathBrewer View Post
I've used the Pale Ale malt. It's a tad more malty than regular 2-row...works good for light SMaSH ales.

I would HIGHLY suggest finding a way to control your fermentation temperatures. There are only a few types of beer that should ever ferment about 70°F. It's so easy, too, whether it's a son-of-fermentation chiller, a used fridge or simply an ice bath, there's really no reason you can't get something to make your beer HUNDREDS of times better.
Hmm you make it sound easier than I imagined. My temps hover above 70 all the time, but don't make it to 80. I have a tiny condo, and I put all my brews in my coat closet. Its a sloped under-stair closet, and I can fit about 6 brews in there. Unfortunately, I can't really think of anything I can do in this small space to control things.
__________________
Picobrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-13-2009, 10:29 PM   #10
Chad
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Chad's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Apex, NC
Posts: 1,036
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts

Default

Willamette hops are a Fuggles cultivar and are a PNW product. Wyeast 1332 (Northwest Ale) is reportedly the Gales (British) strain via Hales brewery in Seattle, so that definitely fits. It will give you that moderate attenuation and British character that you're looking for. I've used in in my Apex Amber, Carolina Gales ESB, and Kitchen Staff Mild, and it's a great yeast for that English Bitter/Mild flavor profile.

It does sound like the NW malt would be a great sub for Marris Otter, though I'd probably throw in 6-8oz of biscuit malt to really nail it.

Definitely find a way to control your fermentation temperatures, even if it is simply a bus tub that you put your fermenter in and partially fill with water. You can find them at any restaurant supply for about $5. I use one, and a couple of frozen water bottles, replaced every couple of hours, keeps me dead on 63°-64° with no effort whatsoever. It will make a world of difference in your brewing.

Chad

__________________
Chad Ward
An Edge in the Kitchen
William Morrow Cookbooks
www.chadwrites.com
Chad is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hello from Pacific Northwest Can-CZ-Brewer Introductions 6 12-04-2008 09:06 PM
Greetings from the Pacific Northwest Lazybrew Introductions 3 11-09-2008 10:36 AM
Hello From the Pacific Northwest! Flipper Introductions 1 10-11-2007 05:45 AM
Greetings from the Pacific Northwest Dadn8tor Introductions 6 10-01-2007 12:52 AM
British Ordinary Bitter jpsloan Extract Brewing 17 05-21-2007 11:04 PM