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-   -   Brewing with sage (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/brewing-sage-362713/)

dregus 10-22-2012 02:39 PM

Brewing with sage
 
Anyone ever brewed with sage? I w thinking of doing a winter ale with it but not sure how much to use and when to add it.

I am probably going to add it to the secondary unless I hear otherwise.

edmanster 10-23-2012 12:08 PM

Im doing one now.. I did the highland heather ale recipe from BYO.
http://www.byo.com/stories/recipeind...nd-heather-ale
Did the original version with the heather tips and a second version with McCormick gourmet series sage leaves/rub.. I did the same time on the additions as the heather but did the .5oz(?) Bottle of sage as the replacement for the 2 additions(one in the boil and one secondary for 5 days).. its in the keg now force carbing but at transfer it was delicious and not overbearing.. fell in love with Epic's Utah Sage Saison..
http://www.epicbrewing.com/component...son-release-#1
Epic's website says thyme, rosemary and sage and I swear I saw on the McCormick bottle that it was actually a blend of thyme, marjoram and sage so honestly can't remember if it was the gourmet series rub or leaves cause I thought it would work perfect.. I'll come back to this thread when I tap and let you know how it tastes cold and carbed up. :mug:

dbals 10-23-2012 05:02 PM

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f66/biso...-clone-264689/

I saw this recipe in BYO and it looks interesting.

Dan B.

bobbrews 10-23-2012 05:17 PM

I haven't brewed with sage, but I've cooked with it a lot being a chef. The hardier herbs like rosemary, thyme, sage are almost never added late or incorporated into cold preparations. These herbs are always usually cooked with the food for a decent amount of time. Thus, I would assume you wouldn't get the best results from "dryherbing" with them. The delicate herbs like parsley, chervil, and cilantro however are best when added during the last 5 minutes or secondary.

edmanster 10-23-2012 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobbrews
I haven't brewed with sage, but I've cooked with it a lot being a chef. The hardier herbs like rosemary, thyme, sage are almost never added late or incorporated into cold preparations. These herbs are always usually cooked with the food for a decent amount of time. Thus, I would assume you wouldn't get the best results from "dryherbing" with them. The delicate herbs like parsley, chervil, and cilantro however are best when added during the last 5 minutes or secondary.

I agree with you on flavor.. I did get allot more aroma from my dryherb though.. do you think the alcohol in there would pull more flavor out if left longer than 5 days?

bobbrews 10-23-2012 05:31 PM

Maybe the better bet is making a tincture with the hardy herbs prior to brewing, and then adding that to flameout AND secondary. Delicate herbs shouldn't require a tincture.

edmanster 10-23-2012 05:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobbrews
Maybe the better bet is making a tincture with the hardy herbs prior to brewing, and then adding that to flameout AND secondary. Delicate herbs shouldn't require a tincture.

Yup, I actually do that allot. This being the first time with sage, I didn't.


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