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Old 02-07-2012, 12:12 PM   #21
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I wonder if with proper temperature control the estery profile could be tamed?

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Old 02-15-2012, 07:46 PM   #22
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anyone ever brew with bread yeast? beer? apfelwein? If so, what were the results. I alway have the fear of brewing and something happens to the yeast, drop it, loose it, the dog eats it. My home brew supply shop is not around the corner so I can't run right out and get some more.
Never tried it with beer, but when I was 18 or 19, I used it for a blackberry wine. Picked a bunch of berries from the backyard, threw em in a large pot with water and a bunch of white sugar and cooked it for about an hour or so. Fermented 10 days in about a gallon or so size glass jug, then put into a few 2 liter bottles and put in the fridge for a couple of days before drinking. Taste wasn't too bad...definitely better than night train or any of that crap, was slightly sweet though, but not overly. Also slightly carbonated, and the alcohol level was pretty high. A good goofy sort of buzz. Definitely a pretty amateur sort of precedure, and I was lucky it didn't turn out a lot worse.
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Old 09-13-2012, 02:48 PM   #23
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I'm trying a gallon batch of orange clove mead right now using Quick rising bakers yeast. It started fermentation almost immediately, and it smells of bread and honey. I like to expirement so I figured why not try a gallon. It all cost about $11.00.

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Old 09-13-2012, 06:29 PM   #24
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last year I got one of them all-in-one canned extract kits for x-mas,,,the thing was on some box store shelf for years and was missing the yeast packet normally taped to the top of the can so I used red star bakers yeast. The final product tasted a lot like a amstell but with a slight bread flavor.

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Old 01-01-2013, 09:43 AM   #25
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Interesting question, and one I have thought about. I expect ester production will be controlled with lower temperatures.

Typically, bread is risen at an elevated temperature (~100 F) and then proofed at an even higher temperature (~150 F). This produces that lovely aroma and flavor that bread yeast adds. I think we can expect bread yeast to behave more like brewer's yeast at lower temperatures, even if it will still likely remain quite esterey. However, there are numerous bread recipes that employ overnight rising in the refrigerator, at temperatures of around 35 F. Especially no-knead breads. Notable traits of such breads are the lower "yeasty" flavors present in them, and greatly reduced 'bready' aroma.

Bread yeast is not selected for its carbonation activity, as a previous poster suggested. That is silly, as a given amount of sugar fermented will produce a given volume of CO2, no matter what. What it is selected for are two traits: Fast action, and storage stability. When a person buys a package of yeast from the store, they want it to work even if it sits in the fridge for 6 months. and when they do use it they want their bread to rise in a couple hours, rather than for an entire morning or even overnight. They are selected for convenience. This is greatly opposed to brewer's yeasts which have been repeatedly used with only short-term slurry turnover for centuries or more.

For the science of it, Bread yeast typically has a higher alcohol tolerance than an ale or lager yeast, from 13-15% alcohol content. It therefore has a quite high attenuation, something around 85%. Its flocculation is very low, and probably will require extra time to settle. I suspect a lagering would give the best results (bread yeast bock, anyone?). It is also an aggressive yeast, and tends to do its work on a wort faster than average. As long as autolysis can be avoided, this yeast will do quite fine.

All in all, it works because genetically it's still essentially the same species as bread yeast; in more or less the same way a both a Golden Retriever and a Poodle are essentially the same species. It's just that one has been bred for a more general purpose, and others have been adapted to a very specific purpose.

Bear in mind that there are still many very fine beers (and wines) made today that still rely on wild fermentation! Yeasts naturally are found on fruits such as grapes, and traditionally this is where yeast was introduced from in wine-making. Lambics (and other beers relying on brettanomyces) have also relied on "wild" yeast to this very day..and they are mighty fine beers.

Don't be afraid of such things; beer and mead were made since time before memory from any yeast that happened to come along; and in spite of this the whole idea managed to catch on and stay popular through the centuries.

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Old 03-29-2013, 03:45 AM   #26
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I visited this thread because the idea occurred to me that it would be fun and interesting to try making a "survivalist beer". e.g. What could you make if you could only get ingredients that are more commonly available such as whole kernel barley, bread yeast and some variety of hops that might be able to be grown locally.

For me, in central California, the hops issue becomes a sticking point because hops generally prefer a cooler and more moist climate. I'm going to have to dig into this issue a little deeper. But in the meantime, I'm thinking of buying some whole barleycorns. Will first need to malt then roast the barley. Then we'll see if we have something to work with to build a batch of beer. At that point we'll drag out the old Mr. Beer ...

to be continued ..... :-)

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Old 03-29-2013, 01:13 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Puddlethumper View Post
I visited this thread because the idea occurred to me that it would be fun and interesting to try making a "survivalist beer". e.g. What could you make if you could only get ingredients that are more commonly available such as whole kernel barley, bread yeast and some variety of hops that might be able to be grown locally.

For me, in central California, the hops issue becomes a sticking point because hops generally prefer a cooler and more moist climate. I'm going to have to dig into this issue a little deeper. But in the meantime, I'm thinking of buying some whole barleycorns. Will first need to malt then roast the barley. Then we'll see if we have something to work with to build a batch of beer. At that point we'll drag out the old Mr. Beer ...

to be continued ..... :-)
You should definitely check out the
You are subscribed to this thread The GaP (Grocery and Produce) Beer Experiment
, which is exactly about that sort of thing.
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Old 03-30-2013, 01:32 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
You should definitely check out the
You are subscribed to this thread The GaP (Grocery and Produce) Beer Experiment
, which is exactly about that sort of thing.
Hey cool! Thanks Revvy. Never saw that thread and it's exactly what I had in mind. Looks like it has been going on for a while so I've got some reading to do!

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Old 04-01-2013, 10:44 AM   #29
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I have used the bread yeast for apple wine and it turned out just fine.It was i think my 1rst home brew.Used the raisins for yeast food and added sugar to a gallon of juice.Not as strong as using a champagne yeast.The flavor wasn't bad at all.I have not however used it for beer.
Hope this helps.

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Old 04-01-2013, 11:07 PM   #30
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I'm thinking the fermentables and yeast won't be as big of a problem as the bittering agent. Barley has been around for centuries. I suspect that specialized brewing barley varieties such as domestic two row and Maris Otter are recent additions to the scene. Old statues from ancient Egypt depict using bread as a starter for their beer. And, like someone else said, the yeast that falls from the sky naturally is the basis for Lambics. So, with good water we have three of the 4 essentials for making beer.

The bittering needs to come from sources other than hops if you are going to try to make a beer that can be made from readily available ingredients. I did a search on the internet for "bitter herbs" and came up with quite a list including goldenseal, endive, chamomile, dandelions, horehound, rue, yarrow, etc. Most of these are used in folk medicines so, in small quantities they should be about harmless. Just need to go through the process of making "tea" out of each for a tasting/smelling evaluation to see if it might work in beer.

I really appreciate the ironlion's post that advised a very cool fermentation. It hadn't occurred to me but, after some reflection, agree that it could have been the undoing of the experiment if I'd fermented too warm.

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