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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Blonde Coffee/chocolate stout
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Old 11-27-2013, 01:47 AM   #1
Weizer
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Default Blonde Coffee/chocolate stout

So, I'm really trying to wow my boss and convince him to let me brew on his 1 bbl pilot system(I work for a commercial brewery manufacturer). I decided I'm going to do a Blonde Coffee/chocolate stout. Blonde/golden in color, full bodied, pronounced chocolately/coffee flavors, and the silky/creaminess a stout provides. I think it will be enough of a mind **** for him, that he will cave.

I have a full recipe made: 2 row, flaked oats, carapils, and a bit of crystal 20. I'm just stuck on how to get a bold coffee flavor without imparting too much color. I'm going to make white chocolate at home, so that wont be an issue. I was thinking of taking a pound of whole coffee beans and racking on top of them? I fully understand that is the worst way to impart coffee flavoring in a standard stout/porter..but If I rack on grounds or cold pressed, I fear it will affect the color of the beer too much.

I've also done searches for coffee extract, and none of it(that I could find) is colorless..and besides, what would be the fun in using an extract? :P

Thanks in advance

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Old 11-27-2013, 02:17 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weizer View Post
So, I'm really trying to wow my boss and convince him to let me brew on his 1 bbl pilot system(I work for a commercial brewery manufacturer). I decided I'm going to do a Blonde Coffee/chocolate stout. Blonde/golden in color, full bodied, pronounced chocolately/coffee flavors, and the silky/creaminess a stout provides. I think it will be enough of a mind **** for him, that he will cave.

I have a full recipe made: 2 row, flaked oats, carapils, and a bit of crystal 20. I'm just stuck on how to get a bold coffee flavor without imparting too much color. I'm going to make white chocolate at home, so that wont be an issue. I was thinking of taking a pound of whole coffee beans and racking on top of them? I fully understand that is the worst way to impart coffee flavoring in a standard stout/porter..but If I rack on grounds or cold pressed, I fear it will affect the color of the beer too much.

I've also done searches for coffee extract, and none of it(that I could find) is colorless..and besides, what would be the fun in using an extract? :P

Thanks in advance
I would bet that you could use ground coffee to impart more flavor and not get as much color as you would think. I've had several lighter color ales with lots of coffee flavor in them.
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Old 11-27-2013, 02:33 AM   #3
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With a light-colored beer like this you probably don't need much coffee. I've thought about doing something like this and was thinking about adding 4 ounces or so of coarse ground coffee to the mash for a homebrew-sized batch. No idea how much color it would impart...might still be too much, but not sure how else to do it.

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Old 01-14-2014, 12:30 AM   #4
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I'm curious to how this turned out. I looked into making white chocolate and it looks like the majority of it is cocoa butter. Since cocoa butter is made from vegetable fat, did that leave an oily mouthfeel and kill head retention? I also looked into Stone's Coffee IPA, which was light in color, and they just used a very light roast coffee bean not to impose much color.

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Old 01-14-2014, 12:37 AM   #5
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Google "clarified coffee".

http://www.jimseven.com/2007/09/10/clarified-coffee/

http://www.jacobgrier.com/blog/archives/3855.html

Both of those links provide simple recipes that you can do at home fairly easily/quickly. I'm pretty sure this will solve all of your color problems. enjoy!

hopefully I caught you before brew day, as this is almost 2 month old post now....

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Old 01-14-2014, 12:46 AM   #6
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AHS had a limited edition kit not too long ago which was a white (golden) coffee stout

IIRC they used white coffee beans. I am sure they are expensive.

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Old 01-16-2014, 08:54 PM   #7
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Anyone think the gelatin method would work on steeped roasted specialty grains?

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Old 05-19-2014, 02:17 AM   #8
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OddSide Ales makes a beer called Bean Flicker that is a blonde coffee flavored ale like this. It's fantastic. I'm planning to use the gelatin method to get a clear(ish) coffee to add to the boil. I plan to work from this recipe (converting to a 5 gallon extract brew). http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f62/vani...blonde-426044/

Here's my question: does anyone have thoughts on the amount coffee to add and when to add it to the boil? Even generalizations like early or late in the boil would be helpful.

Thanks.

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Old 07-25-2014, 03:35 PM   #9
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I've always been interested in experimenting with a blonde stout, and the gelatin coffee clarification was interesting. In researching that method, I came across another method that uses agar agar instead of gelatin. Benefits are that it doesn't require refrigeration to set or the freezing step. The gelatin method also concentrates in addition to clarifying, while the agar does not. Agar also requires boiling to melt.

So why not just make a regular stout and add the agar during the last 5 minutes or so of the boil. Cooling the wort would let it set up. Then just squeeze and drain through a fine, mesh grain bag (paint strainer) to clarify. Pitch your yeast and ferment as usual.

This might work better in small batches where the wort can easily be chilled in an ice bath, as it might be a mess to clean off an immersion chiller, and would probably clog a plate chiller.

You would also lose some volume to the agar, so you would have to compensate to end up with the desired batch size.

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Old 07-25-2014, 04:21 PM   #10
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It's not good to boil coffee so a mash addition would be bad. Ideal tempterature for hot extraction is 190's up to 205F. For this reason a whirlpool would be best for hot extraction of coffee. Cold extraction is also possible and would probably taste different.

As for flavor profile I think Sumatra would go well with chocolate. Finer grind will make more intense flavor so you could control intensity by adjusting the mill. Using a paint strainer would allow you to go pretty fine in crush without many grinds slipping through. BIAB nylons would be my next choice follow by muslin which is probably a bad idea. Too loose.

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