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Old 09-28-2012, 11:47 PM   #1
HollisBT
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Default Big beer help...

S I just kegged my first attempt at a big beer, OG was 1095, finished at 1022. The FG was a bit higher than I wanted, but I think maybe it was my yeast(s) choices. Bt I was wondering if you guys had some tips and techniques for getting these big high gravity beers to attenuate.

Maybe someone can suggest some reading material for me? I'm always up for more books or a nice online write up! Thanks!

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Old 09-29-2012, 12:15 AM   #2
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big beers need a lot of yeast and a lot of oxygen

limiting specialty grains, low mash temp and using a well attenuating yeast will all help lower the FG

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Old 09-29-2012, 12:37 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terrapinj
big beers need a lot of yeast and a lot of oxygen

limiting specialty grains, low mash temp and using a well attenuating yeast will all help lower the FG
I pitched the wort onto a cake from a previous 5 gallon batch and shook it like crazy... Also used no crystal or roasted malts, all specialty grains were lightly kilned, mashed at 149 for 60 minutes... The recipe also used 2 pounds of honey.

I thought I had given the yeast some pretty good food, and I did get a solid 77% AA, I had just hoped for it to finish lower. I guess the aim of this thread was really looking for tips (or answers) of how to get super high attenuation rates. Is it all mostly determined by the yeast strain?
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Old 09-29-2012, 12:54 AM   #4
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which strain did you use?

the yeast will determine the general range of attenuation, the other factors above will usually effect which end of the range but of course they don't always follow the specs

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Old 09-29-2012, 12:56 AM   #5
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Started with 1272, which did the bulk of the work, then re-pitched with 1056, which only lowered it by 8 points.

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Old 09-29-2012, 01:03 AM   #6
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1056 AA range is 73-77% so you ended up at the higher end of the range

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Old 09-29-2012, 06:02 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terrapinj
1056 AA range is 73-77% so you ended up at the higher end of the range
So in other words, I probably just made poor yeast choices?
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Old 09-29-2012, 06:06 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HollisBT

So in other words, I probably just made poor yeast choices?
Depends on the style of beer. Many Belgian strains attenuate higher, but you might not want that yeast profile. What did you brew?
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Old 09-29-2012, 11:31 AM   #9
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Most higher gravity brews can easily handle 8-15% of the fermentables being table sugar or corn sugar (up to 20% for the adventurous). A great number of world class craft beers are made with that kind of approach so don't be scared or put off by it. As others have said, oxygen+yeast=success.

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Old 09-29-2012, 03:19 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepinjeepin

Depends on the style of beer. Many Belgian strains attenuate higher, but you might not want that yeast profile. What did you brew?
This was a DIPA.
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