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Old 12-11-2009, 08:18 PM   #11
Aviciouswind
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Update Time:

Apparently against some pretty strong odds, my wort fermented and has become beer! I tested the gravity last night and calculated out an abv of 4.2%, about what I was hoping to get for a Belgian Wit. The coloring isn't as dark as I thought it was going to be (only a little darker than a normal wit) and it has that awesome cloudy/unfiltered look!

Also, I tasted a small sample of the warm, uncarbonated beer. And it didn't taste bad! On the contrary, it was rather flavourful. I could definitely pick out the spice of the cloves, the bitter citrus of the Bergamot, and even thought I could pick up a little of the black tea (possibly only because I knew it was in there).

So, time to rack to the secondary. Thanks to everyone for the encouragement. I'll be sure to give you guys another update when it's time to bottle.

Speaking of...anyone have any suggestions about carbonation? Revvy mentioned earlier that oils can sometimes mess with that process, and I'd rather not make a still beer =(. Any and all help is greatly appreciated. Also, I'll definitely post some pictures online sometime in the near future for those who are interested!

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Old 12-11-2009, 08:21 PM   #12
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@Chard:

Maybe I'll see how much it would be to ship you a bottle

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Old 12-11-2009, 08:49 PM   #13
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isn't bergamot Bee Balm (Monarda) Leaves ??

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Old 12-11-2009, 08:55 PM   #14
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welp - nope - bergamot is an orange. But....

bee balm tastes and smells a lot like it - wonder if that can be used??

Experimentation time - woo hoo!!!

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Old 12-11-2009, 08:57 PM   #15
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Folklore and History of Bee Balm
The red variety is commonly known as Oswego Tea. It was used by colonists in place of English Tea after the Boston Tea Party, when they threw the English tea in the harbor to protest the high taxes imposed on it by the British. Read More about Oswego Tea.

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Old 12-12-2009, 09:58 AM   #16
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good work. warm flat and bergamotty, sounds like a good cup of tea to me no idea about bottling but i guess if you were to keg a mix of CO2 and N2 would be good like you use for a stout. i think you should continue you so far succesful method of "im just gonna do it" and itll probably work out fine

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Old 12-12-2009, 01:00 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
If it's an oil product it is useless to us....

That's why with orange we end up using peels to flavor our beer...

You are better off actually flavoring your beer with actually Earl Grew teabags, then you are trying to use the bergamont OIL.
I want to challenge this.

Bergamont oil and Orange oil are perfectly fine to add to the beer. In the example of the orange, the peel contains the orange oil so adding the peel is the same as adding the orange oil.

Essential oils are only oils in that they are based on a poly-carbonic chain and they do do not behave the same as vegetable oil or motor oil would. most essential oils will dissolve readily into an aqueous solution.

In the case of using Early Grey tea instead of bergamont oil, the tea is flavored with bergamont oil to begin with. So this would not save the beer from the oil in the first place.

Now lets take hops for example. The compounds that we call alpha acids are one in the same with hop essential oil and indeed we would not say that they could be polymerized or isomerized if they were not an oil.

Now lets take barley, as a grain it to contains a percentage of plant based fats, or oils. Granted that much of the fat content is removed with the shoots during the malting process, but the husks and the grain still retain some fats.

Back to the orange oil. If you ever work with orange oil in the kitchen you should know that it will dissolve into liquids rather than float on top like cooking oils will. Most essential oils have very different properties than traditional fats do. If you have a 100% essential oil, as opposed to an essential oil diluted in a carrier oil, try dissolving it in water. You might be surprised at the outcome.
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Old 12-13-2009, 09:17 PM   #18
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+1... I've always been under the assumption that essential oils (especially) citrus are soluable. I've never had a layer of oil floating on top of my beer from adding orange, lemon, or tangerine peel. I can't imagine bergamot being much different.

What i'd be most concerned with for this beer is a possible overpowering astrigency from the black tea itself, but you've tried it and it tastes fine, so cheers.

Lastly, even if the bergamot oils aren't soluable, it won't stop you from carbonating the beer at all, it will just have no head retention.

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Old 12-14-2009, 11:41 AM   #19
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so I searched this further and found this
Bergamot Oil Information

Quote:
Insoluble in water, soluble in alcohol and oils
and thus the prudence of the advice earlier of adding one drop at a time at bottling to taste. That small of an amount of oil should have no problem dissolving in that large a volume of alcohol. revvy's earlier statement about oils and beer is a bit too general.
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Old 12-14-2009, 05:35 PM   #20
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Why not add a few drops of bergamot oil to a beer that you've already brewed and see how it tastes? Is there any reason you need to add it before fermentation?

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