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Old 11-30-2010, 05:01 PM   #1
amrmedic
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Default Belgian Strong Blonde Question

Hey

I plan on brewing a Belgian Strong Blonde Ale this week. I went to a new LHBS, so they didnt have everything I wanted so I had to compromise.

Tell me what you think of the recipe and my main question is what is a good temp to target for during a single infusion mash. Also, when is the best time to add the sugar? I have never brewed a Belgian before.

Thanks

11 lb Belgian Pils
1 lb Munich
8 oz Aromatic
2 lb Belgian Candy Sugar

1 oz Hersbrucker at 60
.4 oz Saaz at 30
.4 EKG at 15

I wanted Wyeast Belgian Strong Ale yeast, but they didnt have it. Actually I had to settle for Wyeast Trappist 3787. I also had to settle on those hops.

I spoke to them, and since they are new, they are trying to feel out what their customers want and trying to stock up based on that, so hopefully in the future I wont have to settle.

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Old 11-30-2010, 06:34 PM   #2
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Mash temp depends on how dry you want the final product to be. I'd say 149/150* for a "to style" dryness.

I like to add the sugar after primary fermentation is almost done. Subtract a liter or two from your water amount, enough to dissolve the sugar, and add later. The theoretical solubility of sugar is about 200g/ml, which for the metrically challenged is about 4pounds/quart. This would result in a very thick syrup, so I'd recommend at least double/quadruple the amount of water, or 1 or 2 quarts for your 2 pounds of sugar.

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Old 11-30-2010, 08:39 PM   #3
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I kind of prefer the Jamil philosophy when going for the Belgian Golden Strong. Simple grain bill, fermented bone dry. So... Pils + Sugar + not more than another 6-8 oz total of anything else. Mash low and long.

In my mind, if ya start adding the aromatics and maltier base grains, you're getting into Tripel territory. Unless, of course that's what you want. But that recipe above should make a plenty fine beer. Give me some.

Ditto to adding the sugar at the tail end of fermentation. Definitely the way to go. No reason not to, and probably some very good reasons to do.

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Old 11-30-2010, 08:41 PM   #4
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Can you add the sugar after the boil? Does it affect the beer when the sugar is added. I remember my chemistry and you can use a smaller amount if water and create a super saturated solution by heating the water forcing more moleces of the sugar into solution. Thats why I was thinking of adding it while the wort is hot.

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Old 11-30-2010, 08:50 PM   #5
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Yeast, like every other creature on the planet, are lazy. It'll eat the simplest sugars first.

The risk you run by adding a large amount of simple sugars at the front end is yeast that eats the easy sugars first, and then becomes unable to finish eating the maltose. Yeast fed only simple sugar lose their ability to process maltose within a couple generations.

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Old 11-30-2010, 09:29 PM   #6
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That makes sense. Thanks for the info.

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Old 12-01-2010, 01:12 AM   #7
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My recipe uses a little wheat, munich and aromatic. Just enough to develop a little complexity (and head retention in the case of the wheat).

I added the sugar in the boil 10 min before flameout. I've done this every time I've used straight sugar in beer. I've never had a problem with stuck fermentation. I know many people do go for a secondary fermentation by adding the sugar directly to the fermenter after the initial fermentation ends. My thought would be to add some yeast nutrient to make sure the yeast have enough nutrient to ferment the sugar out.

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Old 12-01-2010, 11:41 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amrmedic View Post
Hey

Belgian Strong Blonde Ale

Tell me what you think of the recipe and my main question is what is a good temp to target for during a single infusion mash. Also, when is the best time to add the sugar? I have never brewed a Belgian before.
Recipe is fine for a Blond- Strong Blond but drop .5 - 1lb of sugar, depending on your efficiency
add sugar during boil

I do alot of Belgian beer and always add sugar in boil and never have problems with fermentation/ attenuation.
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