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-   -   Belgian IPA and WLP570 (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/belgian-ipa-wlp570-327349/)

HeavyKettleBrewing 05-09-2012 03:38 AM

Belgian IPA and WLP570
 
I put together a recipe for a homebrew competition and since I was floored by Stone's Cali Belgique, I went with a Belgian IPA. I used mostly Belgian Pale malt, a little Belgian Pils, a little Crystal 20, a very minute amount of honey malt, some carapils and a ****load of Centennial. I pitched one vial of yeast at 68 degrees and slowly increased over the course of a week until I got to 77 degrees. Today I noticed an overwhelming Banana aroma. The scent is so distinct and very in your face.

Question: I have read reviews on WLP570 and cannot find one that likens the aroma to banana. Is anyone at HBT familiar with this strain? What can I expect as far as the flavor it will impart at these higher temps? Will I taste bananas and clove typical of some Hefeweizen I have tried? I was not expecting bananas from this brew.

I have had my head in the ferm chamber way too many times tonight. Maybe I'm just getting high.

rcsoccer 05-09-2012 07:04 AM

Usually the belgian yeast strains produce the banana and clove flavors at higher temps. I've never used this strain, but I used the Abbey Ale Yeast (WLP530) in a Belgian IPA that I made a couple of years ago and it was great. No funky Belgian smell or flavors in that one. So, I think you are getting banana flavors from the high fermentation temp. Maybe try lagering it for a month and see what happens. And dry-hopping always helps. :)

HeavyKettleBrewing 05-09-2012 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcsoccer (Post 4070111)
Usually the belgian yeast strains produce the banana and clove flavors at higher temps. I've never used this strain, but I used the Abbey Ale Yeast (WLP530) in a Belgian IPA that I made a couple of years ago and it was great. No funky Belgian smell or flavors in that one. So, I think you are getting banana flavors from the high fermentation temp. Maybe try lagering it for a month and see what happens. And dry-hopping always helps. :)

Can you recall your ferm temps? I increased the temps on mine until reaching 77deg. I have taken what others on HBT have done and ran with it. I am curious whether the aroma is indicative of what I can expect for flavor??? It will not be a bad thing. Lagering is not an option as the entries must be in by July 1st. Oh yes, I will be loading up on the dry hops! I bittered with Magnum, 20-15-10-5-01 with Centennial and now I may need to look at what will compliment the banana-esque aroma for a dry hop.:ban:

rcsoccer 05-10-2012 01:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maddad (Post 4070700)
Can you recall your ferm temps? I increased the temps on mine until reaching 77deg. I have taken what others on HBT have done and ran with it. I am curious whether the aroma is indicative of what I can expect for flavor??? It will not be a bad thing. Lagering is not an option as the entries must be in by July 1st. Oh yes, I will be loading up on the dry hops! I bittered with Magnum, 20-15-10-5-01 with Centennial and now I may need to look at what will compliment the banana-esque aroma for a dry hop.:ban:

I used to live in Oregon, so I would just ferment in my kitchen with no temp control. I don't think it ever got warmer than 73 F in the kitchen. You will probably get a little bit of banana flavor in the beer, and that could be complimented by using some fruity/floral hops for dry-hopping. I would use some Centennial, Cascade, and maybe some Goldings. Maybe a 1/2 oz. of each would be good. If you have the capacity of lowering the temperature, you could lower it to 68 F, then dry-hop for a week before bottling/kegging. Dry-hopping at that temperature will give you a really good amount of aroma.

Cheers! :mug:


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