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Old 02-01-2009, 01:15 AM   #1
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Default Belgian Candi Syrup

Who has experience adding Belgian Candi Syrup to the boil? Wondering about the difference in flavor and color relative to when it was added.

To be clear this is the caramelized beet sugar used in traditional Belgian ales.

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Old 02-01-2009, 03:34 AM   #2
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As Belgian styles are my fav to brew lemme give u some sucrose 101: First of all u don't have to waste your money on Belgian candy rock sugars or syrups! All these are is plain old sucrose- table sugar. The Trappist breweries don't use rocks or that syrup because it's a waste of money and it's the same as white table sugar- just reconstituted. I make my own amber and dark candy rocks at home. Here's how(I do it). In a non-sticke sauce pan combine: 1 heaping tsp. yeast nutrient, 1 cp. water (tap), 1 cp. plain white table sugar. Heat over med-high heat until this simmers aggressively. Stir a lot. As the water boils out the sucrose will begin to darken. Now just let go until you get your desired darkness- when this achieved, remove from heat and pour this liquid onto tin foil stretched on a big cookie sheet. Allow to cool- completly! you've just made candy sugar of any shade for less than a buck. DO NOT BE RIPPED OFF BY THESE PEOPLE SELLING THIS FOR MORE THAN WHAT IT IS!!!! In the spirit of true Belgian brewing simplicity and practicality rule. Prost!!

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Old 02-01-2009, 06:57 PM   #3
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Tell you what... I'm going to use the purchased one this time around but since I plan to brew a few successive batches of Belgian ale I'll make my own syrup next time. That way I'll have something to compare to.

My primary question though was "how do I apply it to the wort and when"?

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Old 02-01-2009, 07:16 PM   #4
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Hah I just asked this in a 'oh crap I'm about to brew and don't know what is up with the LME being listed separate with no time'... I just removed pot from heat, added my LME and then rock candy. Grab a beer and keep stirring!

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Old 02-01-2009, 08:40 PM   #5
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Just throw it in at the beginning of the boil. First, I like to dissolve it on the stove top in 2 cps. of water so it does'nt get stuck to the bottom of the kettle.

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Old 02-01-2009, 10:14 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RRBBGG27013 View Post
Just throw it in at the beginning of the boil. First, I like to dissolve it on the stove top in 2 cps. of water so it does'nt get stuck to the bottom of the kettle.
I've heard that some of the flavor dissipates if in the boil longer. Have you noticed that?
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Old 02-02-2009, 02:02 PM   #7
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dark candi, inc. syrup is not just table sugar. You might know that if you have ever used it. And it is the REAL DEAL used in Belgian by monks.

Some of the more famous breweries add it 45 in during a 90 min boil. Your boil will stop for 5 min before ramping back up. Stir the wort really well so nothing burns!

The D2 will color your beer the most. With 1 to 1.5 pounds per 5.5 gallons of wort will give you a deep red in your finished beer.
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Old 02-02-2009, 02:51 PM   #8
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Candy sugar is just regular sugar that has been "inverted" to split the glucose and fructose molecules that make sucrose and heated to produce desired colors and maybe flavor.

You can invert your own with a little citric acid and some heat, but it really isn't necessary because the yeast produce there own invertase to invert the sugar themselves.

So using the light candy sugar for a trippel would be a waste of money. Something that use the dark candy sugar for flavor and color would make me more likely to use the candy sugar over plain sucrose and specialty malts for color.

Or I'd make my own rock candy sugar...

MAKING YOUR OWN BELGIAN CANDY SUGAR

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Old 02-04-2009, 12:28 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B-Dub View Post
dark candi, inc. syrup is not just table sugar. You might know that if you have ever used it. And it is the REAL DEAL used in Belgian by monks.

Some of the more famous breweries add it 45 in during a 90 min boil. Your boil will stop for 5 min before ramping back up. Stir the wort really well so nothing burns!

The D2 will color your beer the most. With 1 to 1.5 pounds per 5.5 gallons of wort will give you a deep red in your finished beer.

You can't believe everything you read........
Oh that's precious, I'll take your advice and not believe a word you wrote. And no I've not had to waste money on those silly syrups! Spending money on useless crap that's overpriced is distinctly un-Belgian style brewing... Especially Trappists. You'd know that if you weren't listening to candy reps so much! An influential American-Belgian brewer started out briefly using "Belgian candy sugar" for sugar additions in his beers until the high cost (4$/pound) drove him to send it to an accredited labrotory for analysis and what were the results? Good ol' sucrose! You know the stuff you load on your corn flakes?! The sucrose was and is just reconstituted into rocks!!!
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Old 02-04-2009, 12:32 AM   #10
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I know brewers that have been to Belgium and brewed with brewers there.

They used candi syrup.

Believe what you want.

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