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Old 09-21-2007, 03:36 PM   #1
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Default Base malt other than Pale for a Sweet Stout?

I'm going to brew a sweet stout this weekend and am considering switching out half, or maybe all of the Pale malt and using Munich instead. Has anybody tried this and what did you think? I'm thinking the Munich would really up the maltiness in the taste to go with the roasted malts. I will be adding either 1/2 or 1 lb of lactose also.

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Old 09-21-2007, 03:40 PM   #2
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listen to the jamil show on the brewing network about sweet stouts, a lot of good info there.

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Old 09-21-2007, 04:38 PM   #3
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For any beer, I would not recommend Munich at those levels unless you are very experienced at mashing with enzymes at 1/3 their normal levels. Munich malt and I assume you are talking Munich 10, has an alpha amylase level of around 30 (base malt is about 45 -60) and a DP of about 50 (base malt about 130 - 160). The addition of Munich at the 10 - 20% level will enhance the malt flavor sufficiently without the potential of a long and difficult mash. If you do try a 50% addition of Munich with base malt, extend your mash time as needed doing periodic iodine testing for conversion of the starch.

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Old 09-21-2007, 04:40 PM   #4
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When I get around to brewing it, I've got an oatmeal stout on the docket that I'm planning on a Munich addition to. I can't remember how much I have - I think around 2.5#s. Same thought process as you're having; more malt profile to underlie to roastiness.

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Old 09-21-2007, 04:40 PM   #5
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marris otter would add a more "malty" profile which might go well with a sweet stout.

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Old 09-21-2007, 04:41 PM   #6
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if you use an english pale malt (like marris otter) instead of an american 2-row you should get more maltiness too.

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Old 09-21-2007, 06:00 PM   #7
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I really like Munich! I've mashed 50% Munich grain bills before. I'm even contemplating an all Munich lager this winter. I've just never gone this high on an ale and was curious if others had. The Pale I'm using is British (Optic).

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Old 09-21-2007, 06:06 PM   #8
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I'm probably going to do 40% - 50% for the dopplebock I've got planned; I'm pretty sure that's typical for that style. Don't know why it wouldn't work here, too.

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Old 09-21-2007, 06:23 PM   #9
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My rye ale is 60% Munich (60/40 Munich/rye). LOTS of malt character. I tried a bit of Munich (about 10% I think) in an oatmeal stout once and I didn't much care for it. Just personal preference in that case, I wouldn't presume to say it doesn't work. For me I just preferred what crystal gave me.

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Old 09-22-2007, 02:37 AM   #10
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I would second the use of a 3-5 L british pale instead of all munich. I've found out the hard way (first debacle of a AG batch) that too much munich can become extremely cloying if not used properly. Sure, if you have the perfect water, mash temps, additionla base and specialty grains, etc. then it may be OK, but I'd stay away from an all munich-as-base-grain stout unless experimentation is your primary motivating factor - in that case, good luck and post the results!

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