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-   -   AHS Tripel IPA (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/ahs-tripel-ipa-150140/)

freeland 12-04-2009 02:22 AM

AHS Tripel IPA
 
I am really wanting to brew the Tripel IPA from Austin Homebrew and wondering if any one has tried it and had any suggestions. It looks great and so far all they have provided has been amazing, but this is a different brew than I've ever tried before.
Also I was wondering if anyone knew anything about the double pitching option and if there was really much difference b/n the dry yeast and white labs trapist ale yeast for this brew.

Thanks for the advice

Suthrncomfrt1884 12-04-2009 03:55 PM

I've not used this kit, but I've made belgian IPAs and tried commercials, and I love them all.

Huge difference in yeast. Personally, I'd use the Wyeast. I feel like wyeast gives more of the trappist flavors that I look for in belgians. Everyones opinion is difference on this though.

As for double pitching...no. Just make a starter and don't worry about it. If you go with dry yeast, then yes, you'll probably want to double pitch.

freeland 12-04-2009 06:02 PM

Thanks for the suggestions and advice. I will do the Wyeast like you recommended. Any other suggestions for my first time Belgian brew?

EvilGnome6 12-04-2009 06:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by freeland (Post 1718939)
Thanks for the suggestions and advice. I will do the Wyeast like you recommended. Any other suggestions for my first time Belgian brew?

I've brewed nothing but Belgians for the past six months. Here's what I've learned:

1) Mash at low temperatures (149-150)

2) Pitch cool and let it rise (I typically pitch 5 degrees below the stated range for the yeast and let it go to the very top of the range)

3) If the recipe calls for sugar, add it to the after primary 3-7 days, do not add it to the boil

4) If your fermentation is slow or you're brewing a high gravity ale, pitch some fresh yeast at bottling time

Jenks829 12-04-2009 06:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilGnome6 (Post 1718969)
3) If the recipe calls for sugar, add it to the after primary 3-7 days, do not add it to the boil

What is the benefit of this?

Suthrncomfrt1884 12-04-2009 08:00 PM

The benefit is you're slowly feeding your yeast instead of overwhelming them with so much simple sugar. I like the suggestion, but it's not necessary with lower gravity belgians.

Brew-boy 12-04-2009 08:43 PM

If you only adding a pound of sugar there is no need to add it to the fermenter. A healthy yeast pitch will eat it and still be hungry for the malt sugars. When you get to adding 3lb or more I would feed it slowly in doses to the fermenter.

Diablotastic 12-04-2009 11:42 PM

I'm preparing for my 1st IPA tripel also....I've never used a starter and the majority of Ales I've been doing latley have used dry yeast. How important is the use of a starter in a beer with a 1.075OG?

Suthrncomfrt1884 12-05-2009 05:27 AM

If you use dry yeast, you don't need a starter. If you use liquid, then it's very important to use a starter. I do starters for anything above 1.050. Even below 1.050, it's a good habit to get into.

freeland 12-06-2009 12:57 AM

OK. So with me being a newbie and just using dry yeast before, how do you use a starter if you're not doing a DME, and just grain or mini mash? Meaning how do you pitch it if you don't make the wort until the day of with grain. Probably a dumb question but I had to ask. Thanks again


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